0

votes

Top three tips for newbie?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 24, 2012 at 5:45 AM

I am a mom and wife whose family will resist this idea. Son is six and is already fairly picky. Actually, he likes many kinds of vegetables but very fussy when it comes to meat. What are your top three tips either for 1) Getting started easily 2) Getting child to adopt the lifestyle (at least partially to begin) 3) Most important/life changing?

Any combination of the above will work also ie: top three for getting child to adopt lifestyle OR one tip for each of the above. Very much appreciated : )

My biggest challenge will be avoiding "junk/snack" foods since I am a grazer with regards to my eating habits.

Thanks - Heather

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Heather, if you have any way to grind chicken (or have access to ground pastured chicken), you can form little "nuggets" and roll them in almond/coconut flour, give them a quick fry, and then finish them in an oven. These make great little nuggets and the texture is pretty much the same.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 25, 2012
at 12:24 PM

This is what I used: http://girlgoneprimal.blogspot.com/2010/02/recipe-grain-free-granola-nola-final.html I added a tablespoon of vanilla to the egg whites and used 2T of raw honey as a sweetener. If possible soak the nuts before you use them to "wake them up." I made it with almonds and walnuts, but any nut or combo would work.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:26 AM

I think you are totally on track with the texture thing. My son is 6 years old (barely) but still seems to have trouble with it. I guess as long as the hamburger and chicken nuggets and other meats he will eat are the organic/free range type, that is all that matters. Plus there are other protein sources. I had never heard about the texture thing with kids before, but when I researched it on some parenting boards it seemed fairly common.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:22 AM

I will check out those resources. He actually loves most veggies, as long as they don't have sauces. Some things are a total no go like lettuce (which doesn't have much value anyway) and kind of peppers, but overall I am lucky that way. He doesn't like chicken at all though except for nuggets, and even the store bought kind are not terribly healthy. He has recently said he likes steak, this is *news* to us, but no go on the roast beef. I think he has trouble with the texture of most meats, more so than the taste. Seems too chewy to him.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Good point. I must look into non-grain fed animals. This is basically the same as "free-range," right?

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Great ideas for snack foods. I will research the grain-free granola more. I have a recipe somewhere from a Clean Eating cookbook for power protein bars, may I can modify that to be grain free.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Much thanks I think I will try this.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Appreciate the suggestion anyway - thanks.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:09 AM

I wish : ) I don't know whether to be impressed that he has such an independent spirit, but we have tried "positive peer pressure/reverse psychology" both with food choices as well as other things and it has minimal to no effect. Every once in a while we can get him to try something like going on a waterslide or theme park ride by saying he went on one just like it last year and liked it. But mostly, he knows his mind and will not change it. Both a blessing and a curse! I'm sure it will be good for him as he becomes an adult, but right now can be a pain for us...

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Great ideas - thanks a bunch!

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on July 24, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Bacon and Ham (from grain fed animals of course) are similar to fruit rollups and doritos. Just sayin

Fcf39d668ea77dea39efbe15f8ad74aa

(35)

on July 24, 2012
at 06:19 PM

Totally agree on eliminating wheat as an easy starter. Seems to be the most easily maintained step to take while adjusting the rest of your diet in the meantime!

  • E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

    asked by

    (0)
  • Views
    1.1K
  • Last Activity
    1285D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

6
7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on July 24, 2012
at 06:51 AM

Tell your kids, "This is grown-up's food." They'll want it to show they are grown up!

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Appreciate the suggestion anyway - thanks.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:09 AM

I wish : ) I don't know whether to be impressed that he has such an independent spirit, but we have tried "positive peer pressure/reverse psychology" both with food choices as well as other things and it has minimal to no effect. Every once in a while we can get him to try something like going on a waterslide or theme park ride by saying he went on one just like it last year and liked it. But mostly, he knows his mind and will not change it. Both a blessing and a curse! I'm sure it will be good for him as he becomes an adult, but right now can be a pain for us...

3
41dfb1a4fecb38d24075ff52f13ccb28

on July 24, 2012
at 06:20 AM

You can graze... just don't graze on junk. Graze on slices of leftover meat, veggies, eggs, some fruit. I used to keep hardboiled eggs in the fridge for just such an emergency.

Getting started easily? I'd eliminate wheat. Usually that alone has such a dramatic effect that it makes people hang in when they see the beneficial changes.

Not so sure I can help you on the kid front, but I'm sure someone else will be along to help you on that.

Fcf39d668ea77dea39efbe15f8ad74aa

(35)

on July 24, 2012
at 06:19 PM

Totally agree on eliminating wheat as an easy starter. Seems to be the most easily maintained step to take while adjusting the rest of your diet in the meantime!

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:10 AM

Much thanks I think I will try this.

2
F9013a3c7944d40c983e955f3cc83627

on July 24, 2012
at 04:28 PM

My best advice: don't over think it. Take all the stuff in your pantry that you don't want anymore to a food bank and/or throw it away. Put a protein and two different veg on the table every night. Apples and nut butters, smoothies are great options for snacks and breakfasts for the kiddos besides eggs and veggie scrambles... Lunches can be leftovers and add in maybe a homemade raw dessert item (a bite or two)so its still keeps things fun. But for the majority of it, just stick to protein and veg cooked in healthy oils...

Don't have to label it paleo. Just frame it as not eating things made in a factory or food that comes in a box: just REAL food! :))

2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on July 24, 2012
at 12:32 PM

1) Getting started

    a) Detox -- Spend 2-3 weeks 100% committed and detox from SAD.
    b) Focus on eating for health
    c) Keep foods you will eat raw in the house for grazing (i.e. Celery, Carrots, Apples, Bananas, etc.

2) Getting the kid to adopt the lifestyle

    a) You are the boss, you decide what he will eat. When he's hungry he will eat
    b) Don't make eating this way a punishment (I know it sounds contradictory to point a... But something along the lines of, "This is what I prepared, and if you eat your fill we can have berries with whipped cream)
    c) Get him involved! My kids go shopping with me and help pick the food, they help with the garden, they help dump the food into the skillet/dutch oven, they help season... They are involved with every part of food preparation from gathering the food to plating the food. The only thing they don't do is chop with knives. This is very important. When they are helping cook, they are tasting and seasoning to their liking. And then when Mommy makes a big deal about how great the dinner is they are very proud. We don't have issues with them not eating anymore.
    d) (bonus) Give kids cheats. We will occasionally go out for frozen yogurt or pizza. I don't partake, but it's a real treat for them.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:05 AM

Great ideas - thanks a bunch!

1
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 24, 2012
at 03:56 PM

I also have a very picky eater. I engage him in the meal planning, purchasing, and cooking process often. There are veggies he can't stand and he'll negotiate with me for something else, e.g. he'll eat a giant pile of red leaf or romaine lettuce instead of broccoli, eat raw cabbage instead of cooked, etc.

I stand firm and often use the "This is dinner - eat it or nothing; the choice is yours" line. Sometimes he eats, sometimes he doesn't. He isn't at risk of starving and is far healthier than when we were all eating SAD. If he misses a meal, or most of a meal, so be it. I don't make a big deal out of it and it makes him feel like he has some control over his diet.

My hubby and kids are also grazers (snackers), so I keep lots of Paleo/Primal friendly foods on hand: almonds, pistachios, sunflower seeds (in the shell because they eat less), kale chips, fruit, cut-up veggies, raw cheeses (no one here has issues with dairy), homemade grain-free granola, Greek yogurt, kefir, seaweed sheets, etc. It keeps them satisfied and they don't feel like they are missing out. Every few weeks I will buy sprouted corn tortillas and make them tortilla chips; not necessarily Paleo, but not going to harm them in small amounts.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Great ideas for snack foods. I will research the grain-free granola more. I have a recipe somewhere from a Clean Eating cookbook for power protein bars, may I can modify that to be grain free.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on July 25, 2012
at 12:24 PM

This is what I used: http://girlgoneprimal.blogspot.com/2010/02/recipe-grain-free-granola-nola-final.html I added a tablespoon of vanilla to the egg whites and used 2T of raw honey as a sweetener. If possible soak the nuts before you use them to "wake them up." I made it with almonds and walnuts, but any nut or combo would work.

0
1bd5cfd8c137c93dfdbd159319e5ead5

on July 24, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I have a toddler (age 2) and the way I can get him to eat anything (with the exception of meat...he just doesn't like it and I don't know why) is to either have him help me make it, or have his Daddy eat it. Anything off Daddy's plate seems to taste better to him.

I bet a six year old would LOVE to help in the kitchen! I have to keep my patience with my little guy since he's a shorty and can't reach the counters even with his stool so we have frequent spills and stuff, so his "help" isn't really "help" sometimes, but a six year old I bet would have a great time!

I agree that the most important thing/life changing thing would be eliminating wheat. I know how hard that is...try not buying goldfish crackers for a 2 year old any more. ;) Talk to him about "big and strong" or whatever words work for him (those work for us)...I don't tell my son that anything is "bad" or "yucky" (his favorite word of late); I work on things that will make him grow "big and strong". He has taken to showing off how tall he's gotten, so I think that's working.

And maybe meat just isn't going to be his thing for now. Maybe it's a texture thing. (I think it is with my son.) I'm not much of a cook I'm afraid, but if you are, experiment with seasoning or different ways of cooking. My son likes spices, which I find odd but I go with it. I still can't get him to eat meat but I keep trying.

Go mama!

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:26 AM

I think you are totally on track with the texture thing. My son is 6 years old (barely) but still seems to have trouble with it. I guess as long as the hamburger and chicken nuggets and other meats he will eat are the organic/free range type, that is all that matters. Plus there are other protein sources. I had never heard about the texture thing with kids before, but when I researched it on some parenting boards it seemed fairly common.

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 24, 2012
at 06:07 PM

Get children involved in more than one way. This includes getting them in the kitchen, but also taking them to farmer's markets and grocery stores and letting them pick out whole foods they would like to try. The reverse psychology thing only goes so far, if it's a flavor they aren't used to - it may get rejected regardless. But - by letting them choose the food, you are giving them control and encouraging them to experiment. I spend a lot of time with my son teaching him about primal cuts of meat and where they come from as well, so he is comfortable with meat cuts and the fact that he is eating animals when he eats. We were at a grocery butcher the other day and he was very proud of telling another shopper exactly what part of the cow that a round roast came from (he is 7) "IT'S THE BUTT MUSCLE!".

Another big help for us was the book "Eat Like a Dinosaur", a cookbook that's geared towards families with small children (and even has a chapter for small kids to read). Also, Practical Paleo has a handful of recipes that are kid friendly, although as with most kids, yours will be different.

My son's favorite meal is roast beef (my own recipe, but he wanted to try it after reading Eat Like a Dinosaur) and Roasted, Curry Cauliflower (Practical Paleo). He also loves his own share of whole foods, specifically Broccoli, as long as it has "LOTS OF BUTTER" on it.

I wouldn't say my kid is Paleo, but he does eat a lot better than he did before, we focus considerably more on whole foods. He still likes his french fries, his chicken nuggets (we make homemade GF nuggets for him), and desserts - but he also loves fruit, whole veggies, and unprocessed meats such as steak, chops, and fish fried in butter with dill and lemon... stuff I wouldn't touch when I was a kid.

246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on July 25, 2012
at 02:56 PM

Heather, if you have any way to grind chicken (or have access to ground pastured chicken), you can form little "nuggets" and roll them in almond/coconut flour, give them a quick fry, and then finish them in an oven. These make great little nuggets and the texture is pretty much the same.

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:22 AM

I will check out those resources. He actually loves most veggies, as long as they don't have sauces. Some things are a total no go like lettuce (which doesn't have much value anyway) and kind of peppers, but overall I am lucky that way. He doesn't like chicken at all though except for nuggets, and even the store bought kind are not terribly healthy. He has recently said he likes steak, this is *news* to us, but no go on the roast beef. I think he has trouble with the texture of most meats, more so than the taste. Seems too chewy to him.

0
A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

on July 24, 2012
at 07:24 AM

Ditto on the "grown ups food". Bacon, ham slices, avocados; anything high-fat, really, since fat is awesome for a growing child.

I envision something like this:

((noshing on an avocado with lime and sea salt))

"What's thwt, mommy?"

"Oh, it's grown-up food... You probably wouldn't like it..." ((walks away leaving the avocado within reach))

"I WANT MORE GROWNUP FOOD!"

E9e05b92c245c09f81ab8b6c610a04f8

on July 25, 2012
at 12:15 AM

Good point. I must look into non-grain fed animals. This is basically the same as "free-range," right?

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on July 24, 2012
at 07:01 PM

Bacon and Ham (from grain fed animals of course) are similar to fruit rollups and doritos. Just sayin

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!