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Newbie: Please Hack My Blood Results

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 12, 2013 at 3:25 AM

Hello everyone, I just had my blood taken today 01/11/2013, for a follow-up appointment with my General Practitioner on 01/14/2013. I was hoping you could hack my blood results. This is the first time I've posted any blood results on here before. I am a 25 year old female, and have been Paleo since November 2012.

Is anything too low? Is anything too high?

If anything falls under the aforementioned two questions, what can I do to improve my results and fix any problems?

This is all new to me. I am very interested in becoming more educated and improving my health. All advice and information is welcome. Thank you for your time.

BASIC METABOLIC PANEL

Glucose- 74 mg/dl (74-106)

BUN- 15 mg/dl (7.0-25)

Creatinine- 0.9 mg/dl (0.76-1.46)

GFR Female >60 -
GFR AA Female >60 -
GFR Normal Range - >60 ml/min/1.73m2

Bun/Crea Ratio- 16.7 (12.0-20.0)

Sodium- 140 mEq/l (135-146)

Potassium- 4.3 mEq/l (3.5-5.1)

Chloride- 106 mEq/l (98-110)

Total CO2- 26 mmol/L (21-33)

Calcium- 8.8 mg/dl (8.6-10.5)

LIPID PANEL

Cholesterol- 195 mg/dl (0-200)

Triglycerides- 58 mg/dl (0-150)

HDL- 46 mg/dl (40-70)

LDL- 137 mg/dl H (0-100)

CHOL/HDL Ratio- 4.2 H (0-3.1)

NOTE: I've been Paleo since November 2012. I started Crossfit in November as well, and beginning this month I started Crossfitting 4-5 times a week.

From what I can see, my LDL count is very high, my Cholesterol is high, and my CHOL/HDL ratio is very high. What do you think? What can I do to fix this?

ADDED: Is there any dietary changes I can make? For instance, eliminating or adding a certain food to help my HDL and LDL?

UPDATE: I had my doctor's apointment yesterday, she said my LDL and HDL should actually be measured off of these numbers:

LDL <160

HDL >39

Apparently, the ranges provided on the form are wrong.

Additionally, when she took my blood pressure, it was 104/74.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 15, 2013
at 06:47 PM

...And plenty of people with very high cholesterol (even LDL) never suffer any cardiovascular events.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 15, 2013
at 06:47 PM

I think you're on the right track, although I wouldn't be afraid to increase saturated fat consumption. It should help raise your HDL. It might also raise LDL, but a lot of what I've been reading lately points to it raising the "large fluffy" LDL (the type that is not atherogenic), rather than the dense, small particles. With your great glucose & trigs, I honestly wouldn't worry too much about cholesterol. So much of what we think we know about it is being revisited and revised all the time. As any good cardiologist will tell you, plenty of people with heart disease have perfect cholesterol...

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:43 PM

Here's the link if you want to check it out: http://paleohacks.com/questions/173348/just-went-to-the-doc-who-said-i-need-to-eat-more-dairy-for-calcium-vit-d#axzz2I49nKpK6

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:43 PM

Del The Caveman - Just had my doctor appointment yesterday, she is having me do a follow-up in 6 months with bloodwork to check on my HDL/LDL/Ratio/Cholesterol levels. At least then we will have something to compare to. She was concerned about my aforementioned levels, but I asserted my HDL should go up as I continue to exercise. We ended up talking a great deal about my diet and health. She wants to track my weight loss; however, I did just post another question on Hacks about her concern over the lack of dairy in my diet.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:38 PM

Amy B - Just had my doctor appointment yesterday, she is having me do a follow-up in 6 months with bloodwork to check on my HDL/LDL/Ratio/Cholesterol levels. At least then will we have something to compare to. She was a bit concerned; however, I asserted that my HDL should go up as I continue to exercise.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:37 PM

MarkES - Just had my doctor appointment yesterday, she is having me do a follow-up in 6 months with bloodwork to check on my HDL/LDL/Ratio/Cholesterol levels. At least then will we have something to compare to.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 14, 2013
at 03:01 PM

Unfortunately, I do not have any pre-paleo numbers. This is the first test I have had in over a year. However, next time I get a blood test I will be sure to post my new results, with the results I just posted.

Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on January 13, 2013
at 02:07 PM

Would be interesting to compare to pre-paleo numbers to better understand the affect of your diet/exercise changes.

Bd024f658e77b2244fe16d53cd413753

on January 13, 2013
at 08:45 AM

Its your health that your taking into your own hands so that in itself is a good enough argument to request CRP levels. But to play nice just let them know that you have history of heart disease in the family and you want to take preventative measures. Just my 2cents! Please keep us posted on any follow up blood work.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:49 PM

Thanks Sataran! As I told Amy B, the past few months I been exercising more and more. This past month I've started Crossfitting 4-5 times a week. So hopefully that will help my HDL level rise, and therefore, bring down my LDL level.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:42 PM

Thank you kenckar, I will check it out!

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:42 PM

This blood test was done on Friday for my general practitioner to have on Monday for my actual doctor appointment. I will make a note to her to request this for my next test. Any chance you have a good argument I can make to have my CRP levels checked?

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:57 AM

It's not clear her thyroid is involved in increasing her LDL: you need before and after numbers to judge. Also, Omega 3's have a bigger impact in lowering trigs, not increasing HDL. The biggest bang for the buck for HDL is doing 30 minutes of HIIT 50% and 30 minutes of cardio 50%.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:16 AM

You will learn a TON from this: http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/cholesterol-friend-or-foe? (I'll try to write back tomorrow, but now I gotta hit the sack! And I'm sure plenty of people will chime in to answer your questions by the time I check back. Lots of people with solid knowledge on cholesterol here.)

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:49 AM

Amy B - Also, I do not have any other blood results to compare this too. This is the first time I have had my blood taken in over a year. However, I will keep these results around so I can have something to compare against future results.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:37 AM

Amy B - Thank you for your response! My Cholesterol really isn't that high? With regards to increasing my HDL, I have gradually been Crossfitting more and more since November when I started their beginners class. Since the beginning of this month I have been Crossfitting 4-5 times a week. Will that exercise routine help increase my HDL? Is there anything I can do about my LDL? Or should I just work on increasing my HDL? And based on what your said, it sounds like saturated fat can both be beneficial to HDL and detrimental to LDL. Thank you for your input!

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5 Answers

3
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:23 AM

I don't know too much about some of what you listed, so I'll just comment on the things I feel like I know something about.

According to your profile, you've been gradually making changes since August but a little more strict since November. I don't know what your numbers were pre-Paleo, but if you had something to compare these to, just for your own knowledge, that would be good. If not, no big deal. Looks like you're doing really well right now!

  1. Your triglycerides are great. Good work!
  2. Fasting glucose is spot-on. (The thing to remember is, how your body reacts to actual meals might be more important than your fasting level. Meaning, how quickly does your blood glucose go back to baseline/fasting level after a meal -- specifically, a meal that contains some carbohydrate. Theoretically, a meal that's mostly meat, fat, & very low carb vegetables would raise your glucose only a little.) I am definitely not encouraging you to get anal about numbers here, but if you really want to learn how your body's working, it wouldn't hurt to buy a cheap glucometer and test an hour and then two hours after meals now and then. (Not necessary to do every day unless you're diabetic...it's just a useful tool that will show you how your body reacts to different foods. You can get meters at any ol' drugstore these days...CVS, Walgreens, etc.)
  3. Your cholesterol is NOT high. 195 is fine.
  4. Your total/HDL ratio is high, yes, but that's more a result of your HDL being low than your total being high. Exercise and saturated fat are good ways to raise HDL. Saturated fat can also raise LDL, but that's not a big deal, since the rise in HDL keeps that in check.

There's so much more to the cholesterol & LDL story than we can cover easily here. Bottom line: LDL tells you almost nothing unless you go for one of the more advanced tests that breaks down particle count and size. The measurement you gave here is the amount of cholesterol inside your LDL particles. Research these days seems to indicate that that is basically a nearly useless number. What's more important is the size of the particles and the total # of particles. (Think of a traffic jam: what's important is the # of cars on the road, not the # of passengers in each car, know what I mean?)

If you really want to learn the nitty gritty about cholesterol, Peter Attia has a fantasic series. It gets a little deep into the biochemistry. That's a jackpot for me, but I'm not sure how interested you are in that. It might make you run screaming in the other direction. If you can power through it though, he does a very good job of explaining which numbers might be important and why, and why just knowing very basic info about your total cholesterol and LDL are practically meaningless.

The Straight Dope on Cholesterol - Part 1

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:49 AM

Amy B - Also, I do not have any other blood results to compare this too. This is the first time I have had my blood taken in over a year. However, I will keep these results around so I can have something to compare against future results.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:16 AM

You will learn a TON from this: http://www.westonaprice.org/know-your-fats/cholesterol-friend-or-foe? (I'll try to write back tomorrow, but now I gotta hit the sack! And I'm sure plenty of people will chime in to answer your questions by the time I check back. Lots of people with solid knowledge on cholesterol here.)

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:37 AM

Amy B - Thank you for your response! My Cholesterol really isn't that high? With regards to increasing my HDL, I have gradually been Crossfitting more and more since November when I started their beginners class. Since the beginning of this month I have been Crossfitting 4-5 times a week. Will that exercise routine help increase my HDL? Is there anything I can do about my LDL? Or should I just work on increasing my HDL? And based on what your said, it sounds like saturated fat can both be beneficial to HDL and detrimental to LDL. Thank you for your input!

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 15, 2013
at 06:47 PM

...And plenty of people with very high cholesterol (even LDL) never suffer any cardiovascular events.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on January 15, 2013
at 06:47 PM

I think you're on the right track, although I wouldn't be afraid to increase saturated fat consumption. It should help raise your HDL. It might also raise LDL, but a lot of what I've been reading lately points to it raising the "large fluffy" LDL (the type that is not atherogenic), rather than the dense, small particles. With your great glucose & trigs, I honestly wouldn't worry too much about cholesterol. So much of what we think we know about it is being revisited and revised all the time. As any good cardiologist will tell you, plenty of people with heart disease have perfect cholesterol...

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:38 PM

Amy B - Just had my doctor appointment yesterday, she is having me do a follow-up in 6 months with bloodwork to check on my HDL/LDL/Ratio/Cholesterol levels. At least then will we have something to compare to. She was a bit concerned; however, I asserted that my HDL should go up as I continue to exercise.

2
Bd024f658e77b2244fe16d53cd413753

on January 12, 2013
at 06:11 AM

I'm disapointed that these blood tests do not include CRP or hs-CRP levels. To me this is probably the most important reading in a blood test as it shows the amount of inflammation is going on inside our bodies. And inflammation is main cause to most diseases including heart attacks & cancer. I highly suggest requesting this test next time anyone goes in for a blood test.>>>> Here is what CRP tests show;

"A C-reactive protein (CRP) test is a blood test that measures the amount of a protein called C-reactive protein in your blood. C-reactive protein measures general levels of inflammation in your body.

High levels of CRP are caused by infections and many long-term diseases. But a CRP test cannot show where the inflammation is located or what is causing it. Other tests are needed to find the cause and location of the inflammation.

Why It Is Done

A C-reactive protein (CRP) test is done to:

Check for infection after surgery. CRP levels normally rise within 2 to 6 hours of surgery and then go down by the third day after surgery. If CRP levels stay elevated 3 days after surgery, an infection may be present. Identify and keep track of infections and diseases that cause inflammation, such as: Cancer of the lymph nodes (lymphoma). Diseases of the immune system, such as lupus. Painful swelling of the blood vessels in the head and neck (giant cell arteritis). Painful swelling of the tissues that line the joints (rheumatoid arthritis). Swelling and bleeding of the intestines (inflammatory bowel disease). Infection of a bone (osteomyelitis). Check to see how well treatment is working, such as treatment for cancer or for an infection. CRP levels go up quickly and then become normal quickly if you are responding to treatment measures. A special type of CRP test, the high-sensitivity CRP test (hs-CRP), may be done to find out if you have an increased chance of having a sudden heart problem, such as a heart attack. Inflammation can damage the inner lining of the arteries and make having a heart attack more likely. But the connection between high CRP levels and heart attack risk is not very well-understood."--courtesy of WebMD.

Bd024f658e77b2244fe16d53cd413753

on January 13, 2013
at 08:45 AM

Its your health that your taking into your own hands so that in itself is a good enough argument to request CRP levels. But to play nice just let them know that you have history of heart disease in the family and you want to take preventative measures. Just my 2cents! Please keep us posted on any follow up blood work.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:42 PM

This blood test was done on Friday for my general practitioner to have on Monday for my actual doctor appointment. I will make a note to her to request this for my next test. Any chance you have a good argument I can make to have my CRP levels checked?

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:43 PM

Del The Caveman - Just had my doctor appointment yesterday, she is having me do a follow-up in 6 months with bloodwork to check on my HDL/LDL/Ratio/Cholesterol levels. At least then we will have something to compare to. She was concerned about my aforementioned levels, but I asserted my HDL should go up as I continue to exercise. We ended up talking a great deal about my diet and health. She wants to track my weight loss; however, I did just post another question on Hacks about her concern over the lack of dairy in my diet.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 15, 2013
at 05:43 PM

Here's the link if you want to check it out: http://paleohacks.com/questions/173348/just-went-to-the-doc-who-said-i-need-to-eat-more-dairy-for-calcium-vit-d#axzz2I49nKpK6

1
Fdf101349c397fbe1ecb98b310fb3737

(358)

on January 12, 2013
at 06:07 AM

One additional consideration.

LDL is not measured. For people with TG > 100 the equation is not bad. Below 100 it is inaccurate. If you google LDL equation low triglycerides, you an find your real LDL.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:42 PM

Thank you kenckar, I will check it out!

1
D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:51 AM

  • Excellent FBG. Good BUN and no protein overload issue seen in many low-carbers. Creatinine is a bit high for age but serum cr isn't really that accurate anyway; you need 24H urine test for accuracy. Most doc's don't bother if your GFR is above >60. That doesn't mean your GFR is normal at 60, just that that's the minimum hurdle to clear. You're around 80 based on your 0.9.

  • Unremarkable serum minerals.

  • Your HDL accounts for 24% of TC. That translates to a TC / HDL ratio of 4.2x. Higher than the 3.5x upper limit but isn't too bad. You can get there by increasing your HDL through exercise.

  • Your trigs are low enough. Plus they don't lower your TC incrementally. The Trigs / HDL ratio of 1.3x is great. Tells you no sign of insulin resistance and not too much much inflammation. Notice, if you bring HDL up, that ratio would go down even further.

  • Your LDL of 136 is directional based on your HDL and trigs. Again you can improve by bringing your HDL above 60 and accounting for 30% of TC. That's the only thing to "fix" in your lipid profile. And if you do bring HDL above 60, you will be above 200 TC. You should explain to whoever says your TC needs lowering saying HDL moved your TC above 200.

97d98cdf2f18fa2c0bd8567ea1159609

(1047)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:49 PM

Thanks Sataran! As I told Amy B, the past few months I been exercising more and more. This past month I've started Crossfitting 4-5 times a week. So hopefully that will help my HDL level rise, and therefore, bring down my LDL level.

0
5acf24b21cde32755cace1dc73290af5

on January 12, 2013
at 05:44 AM

If you want to know more about your cholesterol there is a VAP test at www.lef.org that you can order (I did). In general, when you improve your thyroid you improve your cholesterol. So look into what improves your thyroid. Your TSH should be 2.0 or less (if TSH >=2.0, then your cholesterol can be lowered by improving your thyroid, for instance by making sure you get enough zinc, iodine, selenium, tyrosine, methylB12, etc that it requires to make thyroxin). But for HDL why not just take Omega-3 fish oil pills? I do not know if this is paleo. I do not follow paleo. But I know omega-3 will immediately and benefically raise your HDL. I take it for my allergies. www.lef.org has many articles on fixing your cholesterol.

D33a8d5f095a8532ddf7a0d6c27bfe63

(578)

on January 12, 2013
at 05:57 AM

It's not clear her thyroid is involved in increasing her LDL: you need before and after numbers to judge. Also, Omega 3's have a bigger impact in lowering trigs, not increasing HDL. The biggest bang for the buck for HDL is doing 30 minutes of HIIT 50% and 30 minutes of cardio 50%.

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