1

votes

Can someone explain the ancestry references?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 05, 2013 at 7:58 PM

Hi everyone, I'm in my first week of Paleo and loving it so far. I have seen references on this site to people doing some sort of research into their ancestry to determine additonal things about what they may need nutritionally. Can someone give me more details on this? How does it work if you are more than one ethnicity? I am a 25 year old female, half Italian, and half Lebanese, any advice based on that? Thanks!

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:49 PM

Oh ok, yeah I was wondering about the research involved because I have never heard about this. It sort of reminds me of the whole blood type diet idea, which also never made too much sense to me.

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:47 PM

LOL, that's hilarious, I did sort of hit the food jackpot growing up. I will miss hummus though :( but I guess it is worth it if I feel better and lose weight.

  • 217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

    asked by

    (178)
  • Views
    890
  • Last Activity
    1430D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

1
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on February 05, 2013
at 08:32 PM

Don't know the answer and frankly don't think ethnicity matters when it comes to eating wholesome foods.

But can I make a joke? For lunch you can have half of Paleo pizza and half of bulgur-free tabouleh!

If I were you, I would stick with Lebanese food (minus bread) - SO DELICIOUS AND GOOD. I would only borrow meatballs and some greens from Italian cooking.

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:47 PM

LOL, that's hilarious, I did sort of hit the food jackpot growing up. I will miss hummus though :( but I guess it is worth it if I feel better and lose weight.

0
32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on February 19, 2013
at 10:14 PM

It's just kind of a starting point. There are a few books in the paleosphere (Deep Nutrition, Good Calories, Bad Calories, etc) that point out the adaptations our genes can make in only a few generations. People groups who are one generation removed from a hunger-gatherer diet suffer the most when they move to a western diet (think Native Americans on reservations, or newly westernized aboriginal tribes. Some African groups as well).

People who have been eating a certain food for many generations seem to have a better tolerance for it. It still might not be good for them, but it doesn't cause the extreme health problems.

You may find you have a preference for, or just feel better, eating foods that have been passed down through your genetic tradition. Or maybe not. It might just be a fun diversion, or coincidence.

0
B72e976b2df9e7f01315830062a5209c

(1365)

on February 05, 2013
at 08:49 PM

The general idea is that if you can trace your genetics back a few thousand years you can get a good idea of what your direct ancestors were eating on a day-to-day basis and use that as a broad outline of what may be good for you to eat.

For example, if you ancestors came from a temperate climate and raised cows and goats you're much more likely to be able to tolerate dairy than if your ancestors lived on a tropical island and ate mostly fruit and seafood. Although I don't have direct evidence to support it, I also believe this may be why people of Asian decent have less problems with rice and soy, as it's been in their ancestral diet a lot longer than those of us of European or African descent.

217fc6ef1b76bf244bcb22b3e5c5841c

(178)

on February 06, 2013
at 01:49 PM

Oh ok, yeah I was wondering about the research involved because I have never heard about this. It sort of reminds me of the whole blood type diet idea, which also never made too much sense to me.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!