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Paleo and naturopathy

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 27, 2010 at 8:21 PM

Having lost 120 lbs on paleo in the last year, I get a lot of questions about what I'm doing. And I find that the people who understand what I'm talking about are often doing something similar - under the direction of their Naturopath. I've never been to a Naturopath, so I don't know if this is typical or not. Does anybody have any experience with paleo-friendly Naturopaths? Is this a compatible combination?

461312f31b933638202e0308ab4011b4

(258)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:27 PM

My husbadn and I have both had similar experiences with naturopaths given certain health ailments. Many NDs today are also MDs so they have an amazing wealth of knowledge. While they don't call it 'Paleo' cutting out grains is one of the first steps NDs implement (in my experience over the years).

2b4f887f5fd32a37c6038eb0aaaf3bf5

(1648)

on December 08, 2010
at 07:18 PM

That actually was not my experience. I went to a naturopath years ago when I was suffering from depression (I was only eating chicken and fish at the time, and that only rarely, I called myself a "semi-vegetarian"). My naturopath was the one who first introduced me to the connection between protein and mood health, and encouraged me to eat more protein, and watch foods that raised my blood sugar. It was the first stone laid in the path that led me to Paleo.

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on May 30, 2010
at 10:26 PM

That's interesting, Kat. Like most others, I had assumed that naturopaths were more likely to be vegetarian or vegan, but paleo-ish ideas must be getting around in those circles.

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 28, 2010
at 01:46 AM

Well I don't eat soy ever but if I have some scrambled eggs (no cheese) I'll get a headache and feel "out of it" and tired

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on May 27, 2010
at 09:39 PM

Are you sure the egg allergy isn't actually a soy allergy?

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on May 27, 2010
at 09:29 PM

As a side note, I checked Jimmy Moore's list of low-carb friendly physicians (usual caveats about low-carb not being the same as paleo) and noticed that 2 of the 4 Oregon docs listed are ND's. (I live in Portland).

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 27, 2010
at 09:12 PM

Naturopaths do know their supplements but it seems to me that someone like Robb Wolf would be even better and a book on amino acids and vitamins from the alternative medicine section from Borders would be just as good. Maybe not though. Im not anti-naturopath, they just didnt tell me anything that I couldnt already find through Google searches or the book store. But then again I love my Google :-)

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on May 27, 2010
at 08:38 PM

Love this question! I've used naturopathic practices to confirm and supplement my paleo practices - although I've not yet heard of a paleo-friendly naturopath.

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4 Answers

1
8564091e3cf82ea53843c0dbcf57857a

(990)

on May 29, 2010
at 04:00 PM

My first naturopath guided me towards this diet although she never used the terminology. She started by getting me off wheat but then convinced me to give up grains and dairy except for homemade organic yogurt. She taught me about different meats and that grass-fed beef, elk, bison etc (all easily available in my town) were all healthy. She actually wasn't one to push too many supplements, only putting me on a multi-mineral and fish oil.

You might think this is a rare type of naturopath based on others answers, but I now have a new naturopath (old one moved away) who believes in similar dietary principles. I recently tried eating rice to see if my digestion could handle it in preparation for a trip to China, and I noticed some joint paint. She immediately questioned the rice even though I had been going through a stressful time.

I have yet to meet a naturopath that actually promotes a vegetarian or vegan diet. Most will ask you to cut dairy and wheat before anything else.

A80c7d214526e4c4a3a3fe36a7f8b38e

(328)

on May 30, 2010
at 10:26 PM

That's interesting, Kat. Like most others, I had assumed that naturopaths were more likely to be vegetarian or vegan, but paleo-ish ideas must be getting around in those circles.

461312f31b933638202e0308ab4011b4

(258)

on January 25, 2011
at 12:27 PM

My husbadn and I have both had similar experiences with naturopaths given certain health ailments. Many NDs today are also MDs so they have an amazing wealth of knowledge. While they don't call it 'Paleo' cutting out grains is one of the first steps NDs implement (in my experience over the years).

1
Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 27, 2010
at 09:07 PM

Ive been to two naturopaths and neither of them knew anything like the Paleo diet. They may prescribe a diet of vegitables, fruit and limited meat....no processed food and no artificial food. I can see how this might seem similar but they will probably also tell you to eat whole grains or give you green supplements that contain grains (and probably eat low fat).

The one thing that I did get out of a naturopath was an allergy test that discovered my food allergies. This is a moot point for a Paleo person though as all the allergies are neolithic food. The one exception to this that I can think of is eggs (common allergy to eggs).

I really like the philosophy of a naturopath, curing through natural means. I so liked the premise when I discovered the field that I thought about going back to school to become one. But after disappointing visits to two docs that the schools themselves highly recommended and then seeing how expensive the degree was I recanted.

It's a good premise but they also seem to fall into nutritionism and conventional wisdom.

Ive also been to one of the top Chinese Medicine schools in the US (or so I was told) and didnt get much from that either. I think that there is some validity to Chinese Medicine but the Paleo paradigm seems to be more accurate.

Ae011d9f1c8654ea66854ca2a977c397

(1165)

on May 28, 2010
at 01:46 AM

Well I don't eat soy ever but if I have some scrambled eggs (no cheese) I'll get a headache and feel "out of it" and tired

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on May 27, 2010
at 09:39 PM

Are you sure the egg allergy isn't actually a soy allergy?

0
B3c0950cd33bf7689ca0b98e5f2b6cdc

(588)

on May 29, 2010
at 03:14 PM

I had a decade long bout of chronic bronchitis healed by Classical Homeopathy. My Classical Homeopath knows nothing about Paleo, herself being a plump vegetarian. But her own eating habits didn't affect my healing at all. Why should they? All the Allopaths told me my condition would only worsen with age and I was already sick with it all the time it seemed. I was in despair. Now it is if I never had it.

0
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on May 29, 2010
at 01:06 AM

I tend to think that most naturpaths are more in the whole veggie vegan side of things. Yes, they nay advocate for more fresh food over processed etc but I think on the whole it's a pretty anti-meat kinda vibe. I defthink most of them would be big time pro-grain, too.

2b4f887f5fd32a37c6038eb0aaaf3bf5

(1648)

on December 08, 2010
at 07:18 PM

That actually was not my experience. I went to a naturopath years ago when I was suffering from depression (I was only eating chicken and fish at the time, and that only rarely, I called myself a "semi-vegetarian"). My naturopath was the one who first introduced me to the connection between protein and mood health, and encouraged me to eat more protein, and watch foods that raised my blood sugar. It was the first stone laid in the path that led me to Paleo.

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