4

votes

Paleo disaster prepping

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 28, 2012 at 5:59 PM

So, I live in Vermont and am currently trying to prepare for Hurricane Sandy and potential long term power outtage. How do other cave peeps prep for disasters? Any tips?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on October 29, 2012
at 12:35 AM

I have plenty of booze. Vodka, beer, hard ciders. Hopefully temps will remain about 50 *f outside so I can use that for extra refrigeration space after we lose power.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on October 28, 2012
at 11:07 PM

That's surviving in comfort and style? Where's the Cristal?

C695a40e9b013af8728314e7d11ab43a

(100)

on October 28, 2012
at 10:59 PM

I wouldn't use it unless in long term disaster. Zombie apocalypse, for instance. I would include it though because it's a cheap and long lasting source of calories and I'm sure in an emergency, I'd be glad there's food period.

4f1b5248fa85c735438f8a3bca274971

(97)

on October 28, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Hi. I am in Australia and I, and many other Australians, will be thinking of you all in the US and praying that everyone over there stays safe and well.

8f87879387f2a357db7c33008ff9a04a

(887)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:30 PM

+1 for the butter!

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:16 PM

right, funny, lol

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:15 PM

All that makes sense to me except for the powdered whole milk part.

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 28, 2012
at 06:17 PM

Pemmican pemmican

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7 Answers

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on June 06, 2013
at 02:19 PM

The biggest issue we had wasn't with consuming durable stores of food, rather, it was quickly eating and preventing spoilage of things already in the fridge and freezer. We had to throw out quite a lot.

Says to me that stockpiling tons of dried and canned food isn't necessarily the right way to prepare for short term. Long term zombie apocalypse, maybe. But not for under a month. Not saying that it's a bad idea to have a store of emergency food supplies, but stuff like large bags of whey powder, canned fish, 25lbs bags of white rice, and big jars of coconut oil as well as vitamins are more than enough for just survival. Maybe add in some athletic greens or dessicated liver pills or whatever.

If you have pets, make sure you have food for them. After about a week or so, either people had abandoned their houses and pets, or they got loose. We saw tons of roaming, friendly dogs, with tags, and cats as well. We even rescued a cat that was begging for food (she had a collar, but no tags.)

Luckily we have a gas stove, which continued to work just fine, and luckily the local supermarket had bags of ice available, so kept throwing more ice in the fridge and freezer every day or so. It's hard to cook without light available, but batteries in lanterns worked just fine. The supermarket had plenty of perishable foods available as well. Water, hot water, stove, all worked.

We filled out freezers with as many double ziplock bags of water as possible, they froze well before the storm came and helped preserve our food. We moved as much food to the freezer as possible and cooked some meals ahead of time.

Heat, internet, phone (FiOS), cell phones, power were all out.

Gas stoves and gas grills are wonderful, but be sure you have several of those butane lighters and good old matches around, you'll need them.

We had to resort to sleeping bags as there was a snow storm a few days to a week after Sandy, adding more pain to an already bad situation.

Making this worse, tons of people had small portable, fucking noisy generators running all night long preventing sleep, and using up what little gasoline there was available for cars.

Kindles are useless in the dark, Android tablets and phones can't be charged, except in the car, we had gasoline rationing, so had to limit driving to the bare essentials. If I had a to do it again, I'd get an e-paper backlight kindle or Nook as they'd last longer, and load it up with survival manuals/howto's as well as enjoyment fiction. Boredom is a huge problem. Yes, you can sleep when it gets dark, but the window of time when it's bright for you to prepare food, clean, etc. is very short, and if you're used to high brain stimulation like I am, it's a big problem.

Make sure you have enough large lanterns for every member of your family and then some. Rechargeable batteries, except for the rechargeable alkalines (Enelope and the like), are useless after a few hours. Make sure you have plenty in all the sizes you need all the time.

I have a couple of large 15kW UPSs (Uninterruptible Power Supplies) - sadly these contain a fan that runs when on battery power to cool their inverters, so the one attached to the TV/DVR/router was drained in about 6 hours after we lost power. The other, I powered off and used to charge our cell phones, and kindles by turning them on only for a couple hours every once in a while. Having large capacity UPSs available is a good idea.

Forget calling 911, they won't come. A house a few blocks away from us burned to the ground. Not sure if the fire department wasn't reachable, or if anyone even was able to call them, but, you're pretty much on your own, except for the neighbors. Keep plenty of fire extinguishers on hand, you never know when you'll need them. Battery operated/backed up fire alarms will save your ass. Keep a stock pile of batteries on hand too.

I suspect getting rid of analog land lines wasn't that big of an issue as after a while the cell towers also lost power, so the central office probably lost power too, so no phone service of any kind after a while.

Learn basic medical stuff like CPR, how to apply bandages, etc. Keep a bunch of first aid kit/supplies around and refresh them. Alcohol, iodine, Lugol's solution, Elderberry/Sambucus, Oregano/Olive leaf oils, activated charcoal, anti-allergen stuff like Benadryl and the like, etc. Get some fish antibiotics and animal Silver Sulfa cream for burns/cuts. Make sure you have lots of good water stored before a storm just incase. We filled every bottle and every large pot with water the day before, as well as a bathtub. You can always use it to water the trees if you must after the emergency is over, so it won't go to waste.

If you own your own house, and have natural gas, the biggest bit of advice I can give you is to get a natural gas generator installed with an auto-switch circuit to run the essentials. They're non-portable, so no worries about the neighbors getting desperate and walking off with them, and they're very quiet. I haven't bought one myself because we plan to move in the next year or two, but soon as we're in the new house that's what I'll be after.

You might want to store some gasoline - say 20G in small 5G containers, and get some Stabil or other gasoline stabilizer, and store it safely somewhere in a secured, locked shed, away from the house. If you don't use it for a few months, fill your car with it, then refill the containers for the next 6 months, etc. Rotate your stock, just like you would for canned foods. Gasoline can't be stored normally for a long time, but stabilizers help you do that. There are some intended for boats that will help it keep much longer.

If you have large trees around your house, trim them regularly and if they get too big that they might fall over your house, have them removed. Our house was built on top of sand, there's a layer of soil above it, but a few feet down, it's sand. Bad situation for large trees which can be ripped out easily by storms and fall on you, your car, or your house. We moved our cars as close to the house and as far away from trees as possible before the storm. If you have a car cover, use it.

I'd also add, beware of looters, get some guns and learn how to use them, if you can, there were lots of home intrusions that we've heard of after the storm. At minimum take a self defense course. Having a generator helps here as you can always set off an alarm and possibly scare them off, or maybe attract the neighbors if you have a good relationship with them. Won't help much but better than nothing.

1
2e1591c76896828077b930de5107f1af

on October 28, 2012
at 09:03 PM

fasting would be what are real caveman would do

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:16 PM

right, funny, lol

1
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on October 28, 2012
at 09:02 PM

Peanut butter, corn bread gluten-free with tons of butter, kahlua brownies gluten free, protein whey bars, oranges, grapefruits, bananas and lots of water. Is it all paleo, no, but I will survive in comfort and style. Don't have much sardines though.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on October 28, 2012
at 11:07 PM

That's surviving in comfort and style? Where's the Cristal?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on October 29, 2012
at 12:35 AM

I have plenty of booze. Vodka, beer, hard ciders. Hopefully temps will remain about 50 *f outside so I can use that for extra refrigeration space after we lose power.

1
C695a40e9b013af8728314e7d11ab43a

(100)

on October 28, 2012
at 06:10 PM

Besides the usual nonfood emergency items and water, here's what we're working on storing: homemade pemmican, dried fruit, canned fish in BPA free cans, honey, freeze dried veggies, dried seaweed and powdered whole milk.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:15 PM

All that makes sense to me except for the powdered whole milk part.

C695a40e9b013af8728314e7d11ab43a

(100)

on October 28, 2012
at 10:59 PM

I wouldn't use it unless in long term disaster. Zombie apocalypse, for instance. I would include it though because it's a cheap and long lasting source of calories and I'm sure in an emergency, I'd be glad there's food period.

0
89a9b9e63451ba4855f271089d35fe2e

(0)

on June 06, 2013
at 07:07 AM

How well does pemmican store? I don't have a climate controlled environment for storage and temps can get around 110...

0
A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on October 28, 2012
at 10:15 PM

Ah a fellow Vermonter! Sardines, jerky, canned tuna and salmon. Bananas and apples. Sweet potatoes... If you have a grill you can grill them even with no power. Water, water, water. Ground coffee and a French press, boil water on a propane stove and off you go. Here is to hoping we don't need any of it!

0
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on October 28, 2012
at 08:20 PM

I did the same, I live in PA and I'm also going with pemmican, tuna and sardines in BPA free cans. I'm also adding some nuts and nut butters as well as a few sticks of grass fed butter. I had some jerky on hand but pemmican is much more energy for the size and cost. I just caught some water up in the spare bathtub and the washer.

On the other hand, candles, weather radio, batteries, books and board games!

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

8f87879387f2a357db7c33008ff9a04a

(887)

on October 28, 2012
at 09:30 PM

+1 for the butter!

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