12

votes

I Think We Need to Develop "Paleosporin"

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 17, 2011 at 7:20 PM

After cutting myself on a piece of dried sweet potato last week and having a juvenile ground squirrel latch on to my leg yesterday, I'm finally willing to accept that I am extremely injury-prone. The time has come for we as a community to develop a non-toxic but highly effective antibiotic ointment.

So far, the only idea I have is some combination of honey and coconut oil, both of which are supposedly antimicrobial in nature.

Anyone have any other ideas for what ingredients would be effective? I can try the various iterations on the numerous cuts I will undoubtedly get from sharpened food and confused woodland creatures.

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 30, 2012
at 01:03 PM

Great, now if only we all had access to willing breasts full of milk.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Like if you were trying to make it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Like if you were trying to get it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Lie if you were trying to get it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3

(837)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:22 AM

CVS carries it, so probably just about any drug store would have it.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I'm pretty sure you can purchase it at any larger pharmacy...

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 18, 2011
at 06:58 PM

Breastmilk has antibacterial properties, but I don't know if these are retained after refrigeration or freezing. Sorry to quote wiki, but it does support the anecdotal stories I have heard from nursing moms. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breast_milk Breast milk has been used as a home remedy for minor ailments, such as conjunctivitis, insect bites and stings, contact dermatitis, and infected wounds, burns, and abrasions.

F1b82cc7e6d90384ad30007dd6c1b9e3

(1187)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:37 PM

tea tree oil is good

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 18, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I haven't tried it topically, I just chew the fresh leaves. I'll try it next time I cut myself and let you know.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on September 18, 2011
at 02:37 PM

Breast milk is a common home remedy for conjunctivitis-- http://archive.blisstree.com/live/breast-milk-cures-pink-eye-conjunctivitis/

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on September 18, 2011
at 01:15 PM

"The more paleo you eat the more antibacterial, anti fungal and antiviral your saliva becomes." - That's interesting, could you go into more detail? What causes this?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 06:12 AM

As I recall the garlic was peeled and coarsely chopped and wrapped in (foot sized) cloth with vaseline to keep it in place. Then, in order to prevent burning from the garlic, vaseline was spread on the soles of the feet before placing the poultice and putting on the socks. Weird but wonderful.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:48 AM

Anything in it besides garlic?

91fe5b7e10068df9f147ee84320e38f7

(614)

on September 18, 2011
at 03:20 AM

I have taken it internally w/ great success for treating bursitis. Do you know if it is as equally effective used topically?

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on September 18, 2011
at 12:52 AM

I think any mucilaginous plant/herb would be good for cuts.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 18, 2011
at 12:25 AM

I love it. Spit FTW!

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:36 PM

Be sure to use your own saliva. Other people's saliva is highly infectious, because their mouth flora is different from yours. For example, if someone gets in a fistfight and cuts their hand on someone else's teeth, they are likely to get a severe hand infection.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:17 PM

You know, I bet the best thing is not to kill all the bacteria, but to make sure that the ones like MRSA can't *outcompete* the rest of them.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:06 PM

This is National Lampoonish. I have no input on the topical cream question. I use copius amounts of Neosporin, and it works better than using nothing. I'm interested in the answers.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:06 PM

I use it.....Dogs and most animal do too. The more paleo you eat the more antibacterial, anti fungal and antiviral your saliva becomes.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:58 PM

@Dragonfly -- well aware of abuse of anti-biotics - thanks!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Aloe vera is the best for burns from a stove or campfire. Interesting about the plantains-had never heard that before...now I have to go find one and try it out!

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Here's a good reason for you, Patrik: http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/44520056/ns/health-infectious_diseases/?ocid=ansmsnbc11

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:48 PM

You should have seen me trying to keep the dog away from the squirrel and the squirrel away from my, uh, bits and pieces.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:43 PM

The squirrel's got good taste!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:38 PM

I suspect that there we can create something that is more effective than the copious amounts of Neosporin I am using. This isn't reenactment, this is progress.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:37 PM

I suspect that there we can create something is more effective than the copious amounts of Neosporin I am using. This isn't reenactment, this is progress.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:35 PM

Please don't let this thread turn into mumbo-jumbo-hand-waving-total-BS....

4b61b13ed39e5c5d01fe234900cadcf8

(1138)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:34 PM

+1 for the poor confused squirrel.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:26 PM

If anyone else but you had asked this question, I would have deleted immediately....

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17 Answers

7
1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:33 PM

Aloe vera: Aloe reduces inflammation and feels soothing, plus it???s antibacterial. It contains allantoin, a substance that stimulates cellular proliferation; studies have shown it to hasten wound healing.

Plantains: This weed contains antimicrobial and anti-inflammatory substances and the tissue-knitting substance allantoin. Tear a leaf and you???ll see it???s also mucilaginous, or gooey. You can mash a few leaves into a poultice and apply to a wound.

On how to make homemade herbal ointments (I'd think you could sub out paraffin wax with coconut oil): http://www.savvyhomemade.com/homemade-ointments.html

And another site for ointments: http://www.suite101.com/content/making-herbal-ointments-at-home-a165676

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:42 PM

Aloe vera is the best for burns from a stove or campfire. Interesting about the plantains-had never heard that before...now I have to go find one and try it out!

1d0497f8781845ab371b479455bfee8e

(11157)

on September 18, 2011
at 12:52 AM

I think any mucilaginous plant/herb would be good for cuts.

6
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:57 PM

Saliva is a great paleosporin.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 18, 2011
at 12:25 AM

I love it. Spit FTW!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:17 PM

You know, I bet the best thing is not to kill all the bacteria, but to make sure that the ones like MRSA can't *outcompete* the rest of them.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:06 PM

I use it.....Dogs and most animal do too. The more paleo you eat the more antibacterial, anti fungal and antiviral your saliva becomes.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on September 17, 2011
at 09:36 PM

Be sure to use your own saliva. Other people's saliva is highly infectious, because their mouth flora is different from yours. For example, if someone gets in a fistfight and cuts their hand on someone else's teeth, they are likely to get a severe hand infection.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on September 18, 2011
at 01:15 PM

"The more paleo you eat the more antibacterial, anti fungal and antiviral your saliva becomes." - That's interesting, could you go into more detail? What causes this?

5
1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:50 AM

I was told once that breast milk has antibiotic properties.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 18, 2011
at 06:58 PM

Breastmilk has antibacterial properties, but I don't know if these are retained after refrigeration or freezing. Sorry to quote wiki, but it does support the anecdotal stories I have heard from nursing moms. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breast_milk Breast milk has been used as a home remedy for minor ailments, such as conjunctivitis, insect bites and stings, contact dermatitis, and infected wounds, burns, and abrasions.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on September 18, 2011
at 02:37 PM

Breast milk is a common home remedy for conjunctivitis-- http://archive.blisstree.com/live/breast-milk-cures-pink-eye-conjunctivitis/

Ebcbbdcb8b727e69e06eaa102d49a84c

(1804)

on April 30, 2012
at 01:03 PM

Great, now if only we all had access to willing breasts full of milk.

5
0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on September 17, 2011
at 07:49 PM

I know you already said honey - but that can get spendy if you are accident prone. I have read all sorts of good things about using good ol' fashioned sucrose to pack wounds for scarless healing. Yup, white table sugar. Maybe this is another reason it keeps popping up as an ingredient in homemade facials too.

We heard from other nurses and even a vet who have not forgotten this old-fashioned treatment. One wrote: ???As a nursing student in 1961, I worked at a small hospital that routinely used a mixture of milk of magnesia and sugar to cure bedsores. It seemed to be successful in many cases.??? Another objected to our terminology: ???Using sugar for bedsores is not a wives??? tale. I have been a registered nurse for 45 years. When I was a student, it was very common practice to use sugar packs.??? The veterinarian said: ???Many wounds have been shown to heal 3 times faster with the use of sugar granules on a saline wet-to-dry bandage. The sugar helps to pull the bacteria from the wound and the saline feeds the tissue to promote rapid healing of therapid healing of the skin beneath

3
Fe535c4994ac6176f76e1ff6d29eb08a

on September 19, 2011
at 05:59 PM

just rub some dirt on it and walk it off, you'll be fine, it builds character

3
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 17, 2011
at 10:39 PM

What about topical iodine? Unlike antibiotics, it doesn't promote resistance. I don't know anything about sourcing it, though.

B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3

(837)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:22 AM

CVS carries it, so probably just about any drug store would have it.

F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

(2036)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:16 AM

I'm pretty sure you can purchase it at any larger pharmacy...

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Like if you were trying to make it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Like if you were trying to get it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on September 20, 2011
at 05:47 PM

Oh, of course, I meant Paleo-sourcing it. Lie if you were trying to get it on your own, I don't know where it comes from, or how difficult it is to refine.

3
0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:12 PM

Tea tree oil may be of some benefit in certain cases.

Sorry to laugh, but that story was hilarious!

Be careful!

F1b82cc7e6d90384ad30007dd6c1b9e3

(1187)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:37 PM

tea tree oil is good

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 17, 2011
at 08:55 PM

My mother was famous for her poultices made of flax seed and god-knows-what. Once when I stepped on a nail she slapped one on my foot to draw the germy rust out of the puncture.

Whenever we got a chest cold she would mix dry mustard with flour and water and apply it to a piece of flannel cloth, which she folded up and strapped onto our chest. This concoction created heat alright, and likely loosened up the phlegm, but I am pretty sure we just got well again in self defense!

When my younger son got a case of whooping cough despite having had a shot, I made a garlic poultice for his feet (held on with a pair of wool socks). In the morning he had bad breath and no cough.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 18, 2011
at 06:12 AM

As I recall the garlic was peeled and coarsely chopped and wrapped in (foot sized) cloth with vaseline to keep it in place. Then, in order to prevent burning from the garlic, vaseline was spread on the soles of the feet before placing the poultice and putting on the socks. Weird but wonderful.

1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:48 AM

Anything in it besides garlic?

1
27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on September 19, 2011
at 12:01 PM

I've seen urine recommended as a remedy. I read an article about life on an Alaskan fishing boat that described fishermen peeing on their scrapes and cuts to hasten healing. Google doesn't turn up anything definitive and wisegeek.com has a summary of the various views - http://www.wisegeek.com/why-do-they-say-that-you-should-pee-on-wounds.htm . A survival guide somewhere on the Web also says to urinate on a wound if water is not available to clean it - http://www.aircav.com/survival/asch04/asch04p05.html

I hope a paleohacker out there is brave enough to try it and report back.

1
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:45 PM

grapefruit seed extract will do the trick.

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 18, 2011
at 03:15 AM

Holy basil. It works for so many things, so is nice to have around.

91fe5b7e10068df9f147ee84320e38f7

(614)

on September 18, 2011
at 03:20 AM

I have taken it internally w/ great success for treating bursitis. Do you know if it is as equally effective used topically?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 18, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I haven't tried it topically, I just chew the fresh leaves. I'll try it next time I cut myself and let you know.

1
A26b9b992084a55b5cd0d1e4a4204e85

on September 17, 2011
at 09:06 PM

What is missing a bacteriostat. Natural options are silver or alum(the deodorant rock). With silver at $40 I would pick the alum. Note that it is an astringent. Too much would be a problem in an open wound. At first guess I would go with 95% coconut oil and 5%finely ground alum.

0
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on April 30, 2012
at 05:09 AM

Hydrogen peroxide for minor injuries w slight infection.

Two produces I love instead or neosporin for minor wounds: Ed's herbal salve from Herb Pharm in Williams, OR. Baby Balm from Mountain Rose Herb in Eugene, OR.

Recently my mom was advised by her MD to NOT use neosporin on wounds, but an ointment like Aquarphor to keep it moist and speed healing. I believe either ointment above is better than petroleum based products, and the botanical agents prevent infection and promote healing.

0
B1859f696e88d25460a6b8a333412ea3

on September 20, 2011
at 05:26 AM

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 18, 2011
at 05:03 PM

Breastmilk has antibacterial properties, but I don't know if these are retained after refrigeration or freezing.
Sorry to quote wiki, but it does support the anecdotal stories I have heard from nursing moms.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breast_milk

Breast milk has been used as a home remedy for minor ailments, such as conjunctivitis, insect bites and stings, contact dermatitis, and infected wounds, burns, and abrasions. Breast milk has also been used alternatively to boost the immune system of ill persons having viral gastroenteritis, influenza, the common cold, pneumonia, etc., because of its immunologic properties. However, breast milk should never be seen or construed as a "cure-all". Some medical experts are convinced that breast milk can induce apoptosis in some types of cancer cells. However, more research and evidence are needed in this area of cancer treatment.[34]

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on September 18, 2011
at 03:17 AM

Holy basil. It works for so many things, so is nice to have around.

-1
F1b82cc7e6d90384ad30007dd6c1b9e3

(1187)

on September 18, 2011
at 04:38 PM

silver solution and silver gel, basics for first aid and illness. buy them at Nature Sunshine products. this is the type that can be used daily but great to have on hand for sudden issues.

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