4

votes

Which kind of music is paleo?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 18, 2012 at 1:54 PM

Hi hackers,

I hope this is not closed as OT, after all music has accompanied us humans for quite a long time. And it's value as "social glue" cannot be overestimated.

And I guess everyone of you has already experienced the tremendous impact it has on mood etc. Long story made short: This page lists some intriguing facts about what music can do to our brain. http://www.cerebromente.org.br/n15/mente/musica.html

Some quotes:

One simple way students can improve test scores is by listening to certain types of music such as Mozart's Sonata for Two Piano's in D Major before taking a test. This type of music releases neurons in the brain which help the body to relax. The effectiveness of Mozart's sonatas can be seen by the results from an IQ test performed on three groups of college students. The first group listened to a Mozart sonata before taking the test. The second group listened to a relaxation tape before their test. The third group did not listen to anything before the test. The first group had the highest score with an average of 119. The second group ended up with an average of 111, and the third group had the lowest score with an average of 110.

...

An Australian physician and psychiatrist, Dr. John Diamond, found a direct link between muscle strength/weakness and music. He discovered that all of the muscles in the entire body go weak when subjected to the "stopped anapestic beat" of music from hard rock musicians, including Led Zeppelin, Alice Cooper, Queen, The Doors, Janis Joplin, Bachman - Turner Overdrive, and The Band. Dr. Diamond found another effect of the anapestic beat. He called it a "switching" of the brain. Dr. Diamond said this switching occurs when the actual symmetry between both of the cerebral hemispheres is destroyed causing alarm in the body along with lessened work performance, learning and behavior problems in children, and a "general malaise in adults."

Now my question is, which sort of music do you think is most paleo? Indigenous drum rhythms? Anything with a BMP of 60 (as stated in the article) b/c it's close to the heartbeat? What are your experiences, or maybe studies you've read about this topic?

cheers

PS: rock music does make me nervous somehow, while techno (120 BMP) feels relaxing (2x60BMP=heartbeat?)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 21, 2012
at 07:22 AM

Wish I didn't have neighbors so I could drum me some drums! Letsa Dance,

03a4ec34751186201a56da298ac843ce

(4100)

on June 18, 2012
at 09:30 PM

Drums! Drums!!!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:58 PM

How about some grass-fed cowbell?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:56 PM

You're right, it's not one of the most scientific articles around :) Anyway, I would go for the 'release of neurotransmitters'

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Great pieces, thanks!

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:58 PM

Thanks! I hope you listened to the links I provided - they really worth it!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:43 PM

+1 for cows and strauss. I can just see them up on the alp, waltzing away.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:41 PM

probably releases neurotransmitters? LIke serotonin or something like that?

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I think there is something in the human brain that resonates with certain intervals and harmonies - Mozart hits the good ones which is why he's still hot after all these years and why most contemporary classical makes me feel itchy and anxious and angry.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:01 PM

Needs more didgeridoo!

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:14 PM

You're right guys it was "tiestos clublife" which is trance I guess. @bachcole: thanks :)

C0152dd71ab77c1228f74b4a1b78a66c

(115)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:10 PM

I've never heard of techno that was only 120 bpm. Most likely trance or electronica

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:03 PM

"releasing neurons" was not a good way of putting it. Tyler F. should have used a different phrase.

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 18, 2012
at 04:59 PM

I gave you a +1 because I loved your question so much.

276a5e631b62f8e0793987c0496364bb

(1644)

on June 18, 2012
at 02:55 PM

Do you actually mean techno, or some other electronica sub-genre? Downtempo, chillout, and trance relax me, but DnB, house, and others are quite the opposite.

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14 Answers

10
E68bdbd83e45fd5be130e393ace9c9a9

(2058)

on June 18, 2012
at 03:11 PM

I think you should just listen to whatever music makes you happy without worrying about how "paleo" it is. Music that makes you happy is good for you, period, no matter what the instruments or beats per minute.

That being said, I sometimes listen to recordings of ocean noises or rain when falling asleep, and it really helps relax me. I'd recommend it to anyone who lives in a city and would otherwise be falling asleep to traffic noise.

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 18, 2012
at 04:57 PM

It's not paleo unless it features a didgeridoo.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:58 PM

How about some grass-fed cowbell?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:01 PM

Needs more didgeridoo!

4
1407bd6152d9fdbc239250385159fea1

on June 18, 2012
at 02:00 PM

Have you ever seen any of those tribes who beat drums and dance feverishly as a shaman channels the spirit world? That.

(That's essentially what my pre-workout routine looks like--I am the witch doctor.)

19acef0aed67ef8dc1118d8e74edb349

(2954)

on June 21, 2012
at 07:22 AM

Wish I didn't have neighbors so I could drum me some drums! Letsa Dance,

3
F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:54 PM

Okay, I am a teacher and I have attended a workshop on it. The best music for students' brains is Largo and Adagio. They even make special CDs now for teachers.

Here is the link: http://www.newmanagement.com/music/index.html It totally relaxes you.

Here is my favorite music. It is not Paleo, but it totally relaxes me:

Om Mani Padme Hum

Also, I have read a research paper that suggested that the cows give the most milk while listening to Johann Strauss' waltzes.

Here is my favorite Paleo music:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yKLxFmnYO_I&feature=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VTCJ5hedcVA&feature=related (do not milk any cows while listening to this, but still better than Justin Bieber)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Vi-Gy5Je8M&feature=related

Pastoral:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipsdHA3gLnM

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RH9zNz9L_VA&feature=related (bring your own cow)

Enjoy!

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:52 PM

Great pieces, thanks!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:43 PM

+1 for cows and strauss. I can just see them up on the alp, waltzing away.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:58 PM

Thanks! I hope you listened to the links I provided - they really worth it!

2
F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

on June 18, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Anthropologists have recently discovered a flute that is 40,000 years old. Isn't that a kick!

Paleo is not the ultimate question or standard for everything. I try to eat and move paleo because I am living in this physical body which was "designed" by millions of years of evolution. But my spirit is different and much older. I would recommend any music that uplifts the spirit to the maximum, like Bach, Vivaldi, new age music, Beethoven, etc.

2
15e5f57b981183b21fff26ce815bf93f

(444)

on June 18, 2012
at 03:20 PM

It "releases neurons in the brain which helps the body to relax"?

What biochemical process is involved in releasing a neuron and how does that help the body to relax?

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:41 PM

probably releases neurotransmitters? LIke serotonin or something like that?

F31d10b54b31428e189d9b771bf7b1d1

(1439)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:03 PM

"releasing neurons" was not a good way of putting it. Tyler F. should have used a different phrase.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on June 18, 2012
at 08:56 PM

You're right, it's not one of the most scientific articles around :) Anyway, I would go for the 'release of neurotransmitters'

1
7f867a3ea11ddc9fdfa1f4024d1ae155

on June 21, 2012
at 01:43 AM

Country music! As soon as I went no-grain/mostly paleo, I suddenly only want to listen to country music when I used to almost hate it. Strange.

1
D13278772f6612432bf53413fad4e7af

(801)

on June 19, 2012
at 01:48 AM

The eminent biologist E.O. Wilson has this to say about the evolutionary role of music in his most recent book:

"Was music Darwinian? Did it have survival value for the Paleolithic tribes that practiced it? Examining the customs of contemporary hunter-gatherer cultures from around the world, one can hardly come to any other conclusion. Songs, usually accompanied by dances, are all but universal. And because Australian aboriginals have been isolated since the arrival of their forebears about 45,000 years ago, and their songs and dances are similar in genre to those of other hunter-gatherer cultures, it is reasonable to suppose that they resemble the ones practiced by their Paleolithic ancestors.

"Anthropologists have paid relatively little attention to contemporary hunter-gatherer music, relegating its study to specialists on music, as they are also prone to do for linguistics and ethnobotany (the study of plants used by the tribes). Nonetheless, songs and dances are major elements of all hunter-gatherer societies. Furthermore, they are typically communal, and they address an impressive array of life issues. The songs of the well-studied Inuit, Gabon pygmies, and Arnhem Land aboriginals approach a level of detail and sophistication comparable to those of advanced modern civilizations. The musical compositions of modern hunter-gatherers generally serve basically as tools that invigorate their lives. The subjects within the repertoires include histories and mythologies of the tribe as well as practical knowledge about land, plants, and animals. Of special importance to the meaning of game animals in the Paleolithic cave art of Europe, the songs and dances of the modern tribes are mostly about hunting. They speak of the various prey; they empower the hunting weapons, including the dogs; they appease the animals they have killed or are about to kill; and they offer homage to the land on which they hunt. They recall and celebrate successful hunts of the past. They honor the dead and ask the favor of the spirits who rule their fates.

"It is self-evident that the songs and dances of contemporary hunter-gatherer peoples serve them at both the individual and the group levels. They draw the tribal members together, creating a common knowledge and purpose. They excite passion for action. They are mnemonic, stirring and adding to the memory of information that serves the tribal purpose. Not least, knowledge of the songs and dances gives power to those within the tribe who know them best.

"To create and perform music is a human instinct. It is one of the true universals of our species. To take an extreme example, the neuroscientist Aniruddh D. Patel points to the Pirah??, a small tribe in the Brazilian Amazon: ???Members of this culture speak a language without numbers or a concept of counting. Their language has no fixed terms for colors. They have no creation myths, and they do not draw, aside from simple stick figures. Yet they have music in abundance, in the form of songs.??? Patel has referred to music as a ???transformative technology.??? To the same degree as literacy and language itself, it has changed the way people see the world."

1
11b7b7ba720a5cd43c74a0ef99a16adb

(3448)

on June 18, 2012
at 06:39 PM

Acapella along with percussion was probably the earliest form of music.

Singing, humming, making tones with your voice--whatever you want to call it--it comes as naturally to people as talking (in fact, you could probably make an argument that humans sang--or at least produced melodies--before language).

Most instruments (other than percussion, which being a-tonal is a special case) are played in a style that mimics the human voice (modern electronic instruments perhaps break that mold, but I think it has been true for most of history).

1
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on June 18, 2012
at 05:24 PM

I'm just like music, myself. Lately it's been Joe Purdy, Beans on Toast, Arlo Guthrie, Frank Turner - intersperse that with some early-style ska-reggae (Desmond Dekker,Laurel Aitken, Aggrolites) and some late 80's-early 90's punk - then you have my playlist 99% of the time. Oh, and Portishead, which doesn't fit any of the above molds.

I've never gotten into the majority of heavily electronic music unless it's got a strong organic component (like Everything But The Girl, electronic music with soulful haunting singing/lyrics).

1
A95770dd1cb626620429df3ecf19eb9f

on June 18, 2012
at 05:08 PM

Boss drum. "A techno tribal positively primal anarchistic archaic shamanic revival"

1
A65499f2f8c65602881550fe309cd48c

(3501)

on June 18, 2012
at 03:53 PM

I like what I like when I like it....do we have to "paleo-ize" everything? (sorry, haven't had my coffee yet) I agree with Violet9. Whatever music makes you feel good is what you should listen to. Drums and beats and pipes may be the technically oldest sound as music but it would make me nuts to listen to...

1
5495f20862fee8ca6a3d6cf6ece99356

(387)

on June 18, 2012
at 03:39 PM

...Considering way back in the day they beat on things to produce rhythm, maybe added melodies from flute type instruments, perhaps a gut strung instrument but nothing too technical. The women would sing, sometimes in repetitive circular phrasing, and the men would yell, announce superiority, claim women, or declare love for finer things like the best meat, or other amenities.

The closest genre we have to that speculation on our history is rap, but all genres basically carry those traits but are presented in more or less obnoxious ways and with a varying degree of truth.

I might wager that one can choose any genre and measure how paleo it is on a separate scale from its place on the genre chart. All music can be divided by type, but there is another scale, is it a new and original sound or is it a sound that clearly imitated another band? That scale is heavily weighed towards the latter but if I were to make a connection between paleo and music I would use it with the small end being what is more paleo.

The origins of man, the origins of a type of music.

1
35b2cb4d450e5288895c255dfdfff35d

(5828)

on June 18, 2012
at 02:17 PM

I'd consider Gabrielle Roth's 5 Rhythms as Paleo:

http://www.gabrielleroth.com/

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