2

votes

Muscle Recovery on low carb

Commented on March 01, 2015
Created September 04, 2012 at 9:28 AM

Are carbohydrates absolutely essential when it comes to muscle recovery after a strength training workout? I have recently started a low carb diet,(no starches, fruit, or complex carbs just greens and cruciferous vegies/capsicums); got over the induction phase, have good energy but was so afraid I wouldn't recover quick enough after my workout if I didn't eat carbs so ate about 3/4 cup of quinoa in order to replenish glycogen stores. If I carry on with my low carb diet, will I have messed up my progress till now? First time I went through induction it was hell and really impacted on my productivity levels at school. If it helps in answering my question, I'm a 5ft tall, 49kg 16 year old female who is low-moderately active throughout the week. Would really appreciate if anyone who knows their stuff answers my question in detail!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Quinoa punches holes in your gut? Ridiculous claim. Silly alarmism. Also, thinking of a healthy 16 year old trying to enter ketosis is saddening.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 07, 2012
at 05:31 PM

This is a little condescending to me. I don't think interest in this kind of stuff should be reserved only for adults. If she wants to get into this, let her. I'm sure she has reasons.

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b

(133)

on September 07, 2012
at 04:26 PM

I should add that the ingredients are not picked at random. Hemp seed paired with almond make a complete protein, which is better than either one on their own. Coconut flour adds thickness, fat, fiber and some protein. Coconut sugar had a fairly low glycemic index, giving you a little boost but not like sugar or honey or agave nectar would - also it has minerals and vitamins in it. I add in the flax only when i need extra fiber. We all know what spinach is goid for. The carrots are added for their vitamin a content wich keeps my kp and acne at bay and yes it does add a little carb boost.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:47 AM

Feel free to do your own edits, or adjust your own reply accordingly. Point of PH isn't to go karma hunting - it's to provide resources where someone else later on can learn from. If my edits aren't up to your standards, by all means, edit again, or clarify. IMO, he clearly meant to say that glyconeogenesis can produce carbs, not protein as you can gather from the rest of his post. It was wrong, but no worse than a typo.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:42 AM

Yeah, ok, mea culpa, shouldn't have mentioned IF for a 16yo female, but I tend to answer questions in a general, not a specific form - not everyone who is in the same situation will have the same needs, some will want to do IF.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:07 AM

Yeah, ok, I'm gonna avoid the pissing match with you since you have a chip on your shoulder.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:06 AM

As for quinoa, keep reading: http://paleohacks.com/questions/58094/do-i-eat-quinoa http://pecanbread.com/f/tanya/quinoa.html http://brent.kearneys.ca/2011/07/28/is-quinoa-healthy/

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:04 AM

autophagy is catabolic, but in a good way if it's for short periods. Like you said, long term cortisol is the problem. Cortisol from working out isn't, cortisol from daily IFs that becomes chronic, is a problem that leads to adrenal exhaustion. Of course cortisol itself isn't a problem in normal amounts. Not sure where you guys decided that "not something you want to do often" did not mean chronic. Please learn to read.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 05, 2012
at 08:51 PM

Nice to see your comment CD. I wholly agree. People here often conflate acute with chronic. Acute rises in cortisol are completely fine. they're a normal and proper response from intense exercise. Some of the weight resistance sessions that are the most cortisol spiking are the most hypertrophic. This is routinely shown in study after study

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 05, 2012
at 08:20 PM

autophagy is of course catabolic. Why the hatred of cortisol? Sure long term elevated levels of cortisol are bad, but cortisol is getting the cholesterol treatment around here. Cortisol has a very important function in the human body, and without it we would be in serious trouble. Working out, regardless of the type, does spike coritsol, but it also lowers the chronic levels of cortisol (regardless of teh amount of carbs you eat). Also ketosis adaption reduces the need for glucose which, in turn, reduces the need for GNG.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 05, 2012
at 07:44 PM

I wasn't. And with your edit it is still horribly wrong. Personally, I choose not to assume and interpret others intentions and then edit as I see fit. This is still an incredibly inaccurate and dangerous post.

E6c14efded576a0bea38a2fe2beced6a

(689)

on September 05, 2012
at 03:15 PM

The first thing you need to do is figure out how you will track muscle recovery. Then try it and see what happens. Going low carb could give a performance drop but that doesn't mean you are not recovered. Then see what happens. I've been low carb for some time now and have not had any problems with recovery or performance but that's just me.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 05, 2012
at 02:53 PM

Ignore alarmists that claim things like quinoa punches holes through your gut. Internet bro science of the highest degree. All of us humans across the globe thriving off quinoa are just ticking time bombs of holey guts...yeah right.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 05, 2012
at 02:23 PM

@CD, don't be a douche, you know what he meant, if you see the "edit" button, edit the answer to fix it.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Gluconeogenesis does not, and CANNOT produce protein in any way shape or form. GNG cannot provide the body with any of the necessary protein intake. Further, carbohydrates are not essential nutrient and is not needed for the body to function (although they may provide functional improvements). Your guessing is not even close to what has been scientifically derived. I am not a low carb person, I generally eat between 100g and 150g, that's what works for me. But there is no need from a cognitive or physiological stand point to consume that much.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:14 PM

@alligator, thanks, now I can die happy

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:14 PM

I have never heard that before either. And I do not think it's right, Alligator do you have a reference? I know that some vegetables have insoluble fibers which we cannot digest -- But we can still absorb the calories from the source.

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:03 PM

Yeah I don't gym it everyday, just go twice a week for strength and the rest of my exercise is recreational. I didn't know humans couldn't absorb the calories from steamed spinach,green beans, broccoli, swiss chard or kale? Those are pretty much all the green vegies I eat on a daily basis; I don't eat a huge amount though.

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:00 PM

I wasn't looking to get gains just to mantain muscle mass! What you say is true, I'll just have to stick to experimenting with different amounts.

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:58 PM

Well quinoa's a high protein carb source, which I thought would aid my recovery more than simple starch would. Thanks for the info by the way I knew grains caused gut damage but didn't know quinoa did aswell!

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:55 PM

Not because I want to lose weight, my cognitive function just improves when I limit my carbs to non starchy veg/some dairy. I know strictly speaking dairy isn't exactly paleo but I know it contains good bacteria which helps keep your gut healthy.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Thank you for providing these excellent links. Now I believe you :)

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:07 PM

Here's another source -> http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/86/2/276.full. Key take away, "Even if no dietary carbohydrate is consumed, it is estimated that 200 g glucose/d can be manufactured by the liver and kidney from dietary protein and fat"

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:07 PM

ok. take table 14-2 and follow the derivation on 14-3 -- http://www.itescam.edu.mx/principal/sylabus/fpdb/recursos/r65979.PDF. Here's the key take away, "In mammals, gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney provides glucose for use by the brain, muscles, and erythrocytes."

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:06 PM

It's full of soaponins. Not the same mechanism as gluten, but still punches holes in the gut.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:26 PM

I am not going to purchase a $100+ textbook to look up the amount of glucose you can derive from adiposity in a 24 hour time frame. I would appreciate a credible source, I have never in my life heard of such a high number.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:15 PM

Assuming is a bad thing. I said vegetables, and I meant vegetables, if I meant green leafy vegetables I would have said so. To your second point I never said count carbs I said you can get everything you need from eating vegetables (you said to count carbs). To your third point, get a Biochemisty book and read up on acetyl CoA and Gluconeogenesis.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Quinoa is not linked to gut damage.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:05 PM

16?! Get off this forum, go eat whole foods including plenty of carbohydrate and stop thinking about this stuff!

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:29 PM

And could you please provide the source to back up the claim that humans can produce 200g of glucose from adipose tissue?

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:28 PM

If you are counting the carbs in leafy green vegetables, first you're going way overboard and second your wasting your time.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Humans do not have the digestive tracts of ruminants, and therefore cannot get any useable calories from green vegetables (assuming you would have said root vegetables if those are the kind you were referring to above). We eat them for minerals, not for calories.

7e6644836cdbcbe2b06307ff7db92d31

(693)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:21 PM

Your weight looks good, why are you worried about carbs? Lot of maintenance is in the 100-150 gram range.

  • 937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

    asked by

    (90)
  • Views
    17.8K
  • Last Activity
    1264D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

8 Answers

best answer

1
05de181d71c1df6304a03566fe821d4b

on September 07, 2012
at 07:05 AM

Once you are keto adapted (takes 3- 6 weeks on low carbs) really don't need carbs, until then you may notice a decrease in performance as your body is making the metabolic change from using glucose as energy to using pure fat as energy. Your body can create the necessary glucose needed through gluconeogenesis, so I don't think carbs are really needed. I think they are only needed to feed your red blood cells since they feed anaerobically, but our bodies can make what we need.

Read "The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance" - Jeff S. Volek , Stephen D. Phinney

best answer

0
D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b

(133)

on September 07, 2012
at 04:18 PM

I work out after breakfast, so i make sure i have a pretty protein rich breakfast like eggs with spinach and a piece of bacon. I wait a while (nothing is worse than working out on a full stomach). Then do my work out: lunges, some small weights, walk/jog 2+ miles. When i return, IF im hungry, i make a "recovery" shake. This is:

12 oz water 4 ice cubes 1-3 tbs hemp seed 2 tbs almond meal 2 tbs coconut flour 1 tbs coconut sugar 1-2 tbs flax seed meal if i feel i need it for intestional issues. 1/4-1/2 cup spinach if i'm extra hungry 3-4 baby carrots if i'm extra tired

Blend all, drink slowly over maybe 30 min to an hour. This is a meal replacement! After this i do not eat "lunch". I plan my workout so that this shake is my lunch. My muscle recovery since has been fast with minimum soreness, if at all and i am 30. So for a kid your age, you shouldt need as much in that regard as a 30 year old would! Good luck! And no matter your age, its refreshing that you are trying to eat healthy and gain muscle! Right on! Just dont get obsessive about it!

61e52763ad67bad9a8869e9772566126

on March 01, 2015
at 11:53 AM

That sounds horrible........what ever suits I suppose.????

D7f404b29047b12e2c2f528934b7b80b

(133)

on September 07, 2012
at 04:26 PM

I should add that the ingredients are not picked at random. Hemp seed paired with almond make a complete protein, which is better than either one on their own. Coconut flour adds thickness, fat, fiber and some protein. Coconut sugar had a fairly low glycemic index, giving you a little boost but not like sugar or honey or agave nectar would - also it has minerals and vitamins in it. I add in the flax only when i need extra fiber. We all know what spinach is goid for. The carrots are added for their vitamin a content wich keeps my kp and acne at bay and yes it does add a little carb boost.

1
F9638b939a6f85d67f60065677193cad

(4266)

on September 07, 2012
at 05:04 PM

I really don't think the average person needs all this fancy carb refeed stuff. At 16 you probably shouldn't worry about any of this stuff. Just eat healthy food, get enough sleep, get a little sun every day and enjoy your youth.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 07, 2012
at 05:31 PM

This is a little condescending to me. I don't think interest in this kind of stuff should be reserved only for adults. If she wants to get into this, let her. I'm sure she has reasons.

1
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 04, 2012
at 02:42 PM

Why not refeed with a starchy carb and not some pseudograin that can easily be linked to gut damage. Quinoa is a poor choice compared to most other carb refeed choices. If you want to replenish your glycogen post workout, you'll need a bit more carb than a person on paelo for weight loss. But it's not a big deal. I usually have a potato or sweet potato with dinner on any day that I do a hard workout, and that's enough to refill my glycogen on all but the most glycolytic days. On the really glycolyitic days I tend to just suffer an extra day rather than do more of a carb refeed, but that's just because I like random stressors like that to help push me more and more towards being fat-adapted.

510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20888)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:06 PM

It's full of soaponins. Not the same mechanism as gluten, but still punches holes in the gut.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:06 PM

Quinoa is not linked to gut damage.

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:58 PM

Well quinoa's a high protein carb source, which I thought would aid my recovery more than simple starch would. Thanks for the info by the way I knew grains caused gut damage but didn't know quinoa did aswell!

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 05, 2012
at 02:53 PM

Ignore alarmists that claim things like quinoa punches holes through your gut. Internet bro science of the highest degree. All of us humans across the globe thriving off quinoa are just ticking time bombs of holey guts...yeah right.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 05, 2012
at 02:21 PM

Sorry to say, but you should avoid quinoa, it contains saponins that can punch holes in our gut lining causing the same kinds of harm as wheat and other grains.

Stick to things like sweet potatoes, rice, bananas, squash, pumpkin, carrots, and other starchy tubers, or even a little bit honey or maple syrup for carb refeeds.

You don't have to do them, you can do extra protein, but if a couple of hours after your workout you feel like a zombie, your liver isn't producing enough glucose from protein to cover the need, so you'll want the carbs. From the sounds of your question, the answer is yes, you'll need some. Experiment and see how much you need based on energy levels. Also, if you avoid all carbs in this state, you'll go high cortisol, since cortisol is the signal to start gluconeogenesis. Beyond the higher stress, and the shutdown of your immune system, cortisol is of course catabolic, not something you want to do often.

The upside is that if you work out fasted (you didn't say about IFs), and avoid eating for an hour or so after the workout, then refeed with carbs, you'll ensure you increase insulin sensitivity and of course get all the benefits of autophagy. But note that if you do IF, you'll still need the same calories, and you can't avoid carbs, especially since you're working out at levels that say you require carbs.

The good news is that you can get back into ketosis the next day by consuming coconut oil and going low carb until after the next workout.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:06 AM

As for quinoa, keep reading: http://paleohacks.com/questions/58094/do-i-eat-quinoa http://pecanbread.com/f/tanya/quinoa.html http://brent.kearneys.ca/2011/07/28/is-quinoa-healthy/

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 05, 2012
at 08:51 PM

Nice to see your comment CD. I wholly agree. People here often conflate acute with chronic. Acute rises in cortisol are completely fine. they're a normal and proper response from intense exercise. Some of the weight resistance sessions that are the most cortisol spiking are the most hypertrophic. This is routinely shown in study after study

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Quinoa punches holes in your gut? Ridiculous claim. Silly alarmism. Also, thinking of a healthy 16 year old trying to enter ketosis is saddening.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:42 AM

Yeah, ok, mea culpa, shouldn't have mentioned IF for a 16yo female, but I tend to answer questions in a general, not a specific form - not everyone who is in the same situation will have the same needs, some will want to do IF.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 05, 2012
at 08:20 PM

autophagy is of course catabolic. Why the hatred of cortisol? Sure long term elevated levels of cortisol are bad, but cortisol is getting the cholesterol treatment around here. Cortisol has a very important function in the human body, and without it we would be in serious trouble. Working out, regardless of the type, does spike coritsol, but it also lowers the chronic levels of cortisol (regardless of teh amount of carbs you eat). Also ketosis adaption reduces the need for glucose which, in turn, reduces the need for GNG.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:04 AM

autophagy is catabolic, but in a good way if it's for short periods. Like you said, long term cortisol is the problem. Cortisol from working out isn't, cortisol from daily IFs that becomes chronic, is a problem that leads to adrenal exhaustion. Of course cortisol itself isn't a problem in normal amounts. Not sure where you guys decided that "not something you want to do often" did not mean chronic. Please learn to read.

0
E753cf7753e7be889ca68b1a4203483f

on September 04, 2012
at 09:11 PM

To clear up some of the confusion! Gluconeogenesis can produce roughly half the amount of your daily carb needs from protein intake (eating 100grams of protein means roughly 50grams of glucose can potentially be made). From fat it's a bit more complicated but roughly 10% of total burned fat can be directly used to make glucose (150grams of burned fat mens then 15grams of produced glucose). On top of that , some glucose can be made from ketones (my guess would be 10-15grams a day on a ketogenic diet). Your daily glucose needs are most likely somewhat above this level, even without strength training, and strength training may increase your daily need with some 50-70grams. Increased intake of protein can potentially provide you with the needed raw material, but I would recommend eating some 150 grams of carbs daily, unless you eat a lot of protein.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 05, 2012
at 02:23 PM

@CD, don't be a douche, you know what he meant, if you see the "edit" button, edit the answer to fix it.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:47 AM

Feel free to do your own edits, or adjust your own reply accordingly. Point of PH isn't to go karma hunting - it's to provide resources where someone else later on can learn from. If my edits aren't up to your standards, by all means, edit again, or clarify. IMO, he clearly meant to say that glyconeogenesis can produce carbs, not protein as you can gather from the rest of his post. It was wrong, but no worse than a typo.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Gluconeogenesis does not, and CANNOT produce protein in any way shape or form. GNG cannot provide the body with any of the necessary protein intake. Further, carbohydrates are not essential nutrient and is not needed for the body to function (although they may provide functional improvements). Your guessing is not even close to what has been scientifically derived. I am not a low carb person, I generally eat between 100g and 150g, that's what works for me. But there is no need from a cognitive or physiological stand point to consume that much.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 05, 2012
at 07:44 PM

I wasn't. And with your edit it is still horribly wrong. Personally, I choose not to assume and interpret others intentions and then edit as I see fit. This is still an incredibly inaccurate and dangerous post.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:07 AM

Yeah, ok, I'm gonna avoid the pissing match with you since you have a chip on your shoulder.

0
F1edc54a7fb4b84764aa7db05518c0ca

(285)

on September 04, 2012
at 04:20 PM

You can get gains on any diet provided you are hitting a surplus of calories.

There is a significant difference however between bodybuilding, training for strength, training for fitness, powerlifting etc. and understanding your specific goals and the level of intensity you train at should determine how you eat.

IMHO, from a bodybuilding perspective optimal gains require carbs for a multitude of reasons (Muscle stores, body stores, transport, initiation etc.).

Each person/body is different however and there is no single ratio/design that works best for everyone. Additionally, as stated, different end goals and different intensity levels will have different requirements...

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:00 PM

I wasn't looking to get gains just to mantain muscle mass! What you say is true, I'll just have to stick to experimenting with different amounts.

-2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 02:30 PM

You liver can produce about 200g glucose from fat stores each day. So if you are planning on depleting your glycogen stores every day then yes, you need carbs.

If you only plan to lift a couple of times a week, and you are eating healthy, there is not a need to "re-feed" or hit a "carb window". You can get plenty of carbs from veggies, and likely only need 50g of carbs a day.

That being said, don't worry so much about hitting carb windows. Eat for health, learn to trust your body. If it needs carbs, eat some. Fruit and Veggies are great sources of carbs. Quinoa is a great source too, 3/4 cup is about 90g of carbs.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:33 PM

Thank you for providing these excellent links. Now I believe you :)

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:26 PM

Humans do not have the digestive tracts of ruminants, and therefore cannot get any useable calories from green vegetables (assuming you would have said root vegetables if those are the kind you were referring to above). We eat them for minerals, not for calories.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:26 PM

I am not going to purchase a $100+ textbook to look up the amount of glucose you can derive from adiposity in a 24 hour time frame. I would appreciate a credible source, I have never in my life heard of such a high number.

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:29 PM

And could you please provide the source to back up the claim that humans can produce 200g of glucose from adipose tissue?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:14 PM

@alligator, thanks, now I can die happy

937025faf9308f14438817d5cc09ee3d

(90)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:03 PM

Yeah I don't gym it everyday, just go twice a week for strength and the rest of my exercise is recreational. I didn't know humans couldn't absorb the calories from steamed spinach,green beans, broccoli, swiss chard or kale? Those are pretty much all the green vegies I eat on a daily basis; I don't eat a huge amount though.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:07 PM

ok. take table 14-2 and follow the derivation on 14-3 -- http://www.itescam.edu.mx/principal/sylabus/fpdb/recursos/r65979.PDF. Here's the key take away, "In mammals, gluconeogenesis in the liver and kidney provides glucose for use by the brain, muscles, and erythrocytes."

3a9d5dde5212ccd34b860bb6ed07bbef

(1782)

on September 04, 2012
at 05:28 PM

If you are counting the carbs in leafy green vegetables, first you're going way overboard and second your wasting your time.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 07:07 PM

Here's another source -> http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/86/2/276.full. Key take away, "Even if no dietary carbohydrate is consumed, it is estimated that 200 g glucose/d can be manufactured by the liver and kidney from dietary protein and fat"

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 06:15 PM

Assuming is a bad thing. I said vegetables, and I meant vegetables, if I meant green leafy vegetables I would have said so. To your second point I never said count carbs I said you can get everything you need from eating vegetables (you said to count carbs). To your third point, get a Biochemisty book and read up on acetyl CoA and Gluconeogenesis.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 04, 2012
at 08:14 PM

I have never heard that before either. And I do not think it's right, Alligator do you have a reference? I know that some vegetables have insoluble fibers which we cannot digest -- But we can still absorb the calories from the source.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!