2

votes

Anyone Know Much About Disuse Atrophy of Skeletal Muscle?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 21, 2011 at 11:57 PM

It's pretty well known that unloading muscles via prolonged bedrest or time spent in microgravity will result in noticeable atrophy. What I'd like to know is if there is some amount of atrophy that occurs between workouts. If we consider resistance training to be an artificially high load on a particular muscle during the workout, contrasted with a much lower load (in our normal state for the time between workouts) does this mean that although resistance training results in hypertrophy, there's still some amount of atrophy that is occurring between workouts?

For example, is it the case that in the course of a week I have 5 units of hypertrophy due to working out, say, my quadriceps, but 2 units of atrophy, so the net result is 3 units of hypertrophy? Or does the fact that the muscle is being repaired between workouts mean that atrophy is postponed some number of days? Does the atrophy clock begin as soon as the muscle is fully repaired some number of days after a workout?

I ask this because I've been pondering using some minimal amount of volume on the intervening days to "remind" the muscles that they are necessary and need to not atrophy. I imagine this to be a single set (or maybe just a couple reps?) on what would normally be off days as a reinforcement of the necessity of the added muscle. It wouldn't be that difficult to do this, but I'd rather not do it if it's worthless or if it interferes with repair.

Any info is appreciated.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 01:10 PM

Nope......science has shown there is a paradox for training. Like anything else too much is not good.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 01:09 PM

Perfomance does not equal longevity. And longevity is what my number one goal is. That is why there will be a fork in the road for paleo's that love cross fit and those who look at the science. What is your goal? To perform like Phelps or Armstrong or live like Jean Clamment? I know what my choice it. The turtle wins the race. Go read Nick Lane's book Travis......Power Sex and Suicide and focus on the last 7 chapters. The book rocks.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 22, 2011
at 03:39 AM

That's really interesting, and I hadn't begun to think about telomere length. I think there's likely a safe range of training that is more beneficial than harmful in the long run.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Travis.....I used to think the more mass and strength and power were great for longevity. I no longer beleive that. Infact I think mass power and strength maybe good short term performance goals but there is much data that shows we can lose stem cells via apoptosis and cause the muscles we have left to age more quickly. this is an area where the science is rapidily evolving.

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (39821)
  • Views
    1.9K
  • Last Activity
    1547D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

2 Answers

2
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 01:17 AM

dont do too much because you can irreversibly damage your skeletal and cardiac muscle. I called my exercise physiology MD in our practice about your question and he said this does not happen......if you exercise consistently with rests. He forward this article. Pretty interesting stuff.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12972872

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 01:09 PM

Perfomance does not equal longevity. And longevity is what my number one goal is. That is why there will be a fork in the road for paleo's that love cross fit and those who look at the science. What is your goal? To perform like Phelps or Armstrong or live like Jean Clamment? I know what my choice it. The turtle wins the race. Go read Nick Lane's book Travis......Power Sex and Suicide and focus on the last 7 chapters. The book rocks.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 02:39 AM

Travis.....I used to think the more mass and strength and power were great for longevity. I no longer beleive that. Infact I think mass power and strength maybe good short term performance goals but there is much data that shows we can lose stem cells via apoptosis and cause the muscles we have left to age more quickly. this is an area where the science is rapidily evolving.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on March 22, 2011
at 03:39 AM

That's really interesting, and I hadn't begun to think about telomere length. I think there's likely a safe range of training that is more beneficial than harmful in the long run.

1
40e972023f7ec97a17b9794ab849df5f

on March 22, 2011
at 01:28 AM

Maybe you are way over analyzing this. Lots of body builders, and/or figure competitors work out 6 days a week, not every muscle every day.... but muscles are affected by what you do no matter what. Pick a workout, e/o day, or M/W/F, or M,T-W-F, or..... whatever. Just don't work the same muscle (about) more than every 3 days.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on March 22, 2011
at 01:10 PM

Nope......science has shown there is a paradox for training. Like anything else too much is not good.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!