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Thinking about moving; suggestions?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 01, 2013 at 5:34 PM

My husband and I live in the Dallas/Fort Worth area but are thinking about relocating. We're moving more Paleo to try to address some lingering health issues I've had and to strengthen my constitution, but we're concerned that this location may be a hindrance for a number of reasons:

  1. The summers are brutally hot and we feel crappy for several months because of it.
  2. It tends to be humid here, which we don't like. My best days are the ones when the humidity drops temporarily. Whenever we vacation in a drier place (like southern Utah), we always feel better ... radically better in my case.
  3. It's not exactly scenic here. Put this together with the weather and humidity issues and we rarely enjoy going outside to play. We enjoy hiking when we vacation and would like to do this more often.
  4. The air quality here is getting worse as the population grows. Breathing more pollution can't be good.

There are a few excellent things going for us here: awesome gourmet grocery stores with quality organics, a good farmer's market, and access to local grassfed meats, eggs, and milk. I have a little system going for getting my good foods and can't imagine moving someplace where I wouldn't have access to that. It's a huge priority for me. So, that's a given requirement. We'd also like to find a place with:

  1. Tech jobs, specifically software engineering, for my husband, without too long of a commute (under 30 minutes);
  2. Relatively little pollution and good air quality;
  3. Lower humidity;
  4. Mild summers and four actual seasons!
  5. Great areas for playing outdoors.

Any suggestions of locations here in the US?

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 03, 2013
at 06:08 AM

I just moved from Boston back to Texas, after 10 long years. It's a great state but low humidity is much worse than high and its low all winter. Your skin peels and your eyes burn. People get depressed from low sunlight all winter and everyone is massively Vitamin D deficient. Good schools in 95 belt (Newton, Lexington, etc) run ~$400/sf for junk. $325k isn't even close. Lived in Worcester and MetroWest too. Don't go there.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 02, 2013
at 04:57 PM

Wow, I've found MA "refreshing" compared to other places I've lived. I always assumed the sea air helped (compared to lakes or rivers).

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on May 02, 2013
at 04:32 PM

I live in the greater Boston area, have done for 3 years and am miserable for almost all of the reasons the OP listed, and can't wait to leave. The humidity alone is a killer deal-breaker, I'll leave it at that rather than offend the whole of Massachusetts with my unhappy list.

F3eee6d7dab709e3b17c7f43f8ec2ef0

(0)

on May 02, 2013
at 01:31 PM

This is fascinating ... thank you!

800e726cb5dff569fd8edf604c3e2793

(1655)

on May 01, 2013
at 06:52 PM

If the OP feels the humidity is too high in Texas... that might be a deal-killer for MA.

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5 Answers

1
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 01, 2013
at 06:14 PM

The Greater Boston area.

Ranges from the eastern seaboard of Massachusetts to Worcestor, MA. Collectively, most would refer to this as Boston, Greater Boston, then Metro West traveling east to west.

  1. Pretty much in the top-three locations for tech jobs - California, NYC, or here. Frankly, I think Boston is better than NYC, if only because of a slightly less onerous cost of living. I work as a technical/software consultant myself. I've worked in Metro West (Marlborough) as well as Boston proper, where I am at the moment. Driving into Boston sucks. However, the commuter rail is freaking fantastic. Even from Metro West areas like Fitchburg or Franklin (pretty much as far west as Worcestor) the time into Boston is about 1h15m max - that's 40 miles as the crow files.
  2. MA has a pretty freaking good ecological footprint overall. All cities recycle. If your living in Boston proper, then the realities of a big city are there, but as you move out westwards, the cities are well wooded, and there's lots of lakes, rivers, and ponds all around. Lots.
  3. Ehhhhh ... it's not to bad. Summers can be ugly, but I grew up in Cleveland, OH where they were much worse.
  4. Four seasons, where you can experience the wonders and the horrors of each one. From warm sunny days of summer, to vibrantly colored leaves of Fall, to the heat of your blood boiling as you shovel knee-deep snow for the 3rd day in a row. You aren't far from Western MA where the Berkshires offer one of the greatest Fall scenes the US has to offer. (Technically, you aren't far from anything in MA.)
  5. Can't really be beat! There's tons of parks in MA, not to mention Cape Cod or the entire sea front.

Food. There are plenty of farmer's markets in my neck of the woods -- and even better: actual farms with farm stands. I get grass fed beef from the farm / ice cream place, for example. (Okay, I get ice cream there, too sometimes.)

Cost of living. Cost here is high. Really, really high. Salaries are appropriately high, as well, which is good. However, coming from Texas, where there's a good chance you can find a 3600sqft home for $300k, in Greater Boston, if you find a 2000sqft home for $325k, you're doing great -- and if you want to live in the city itself, be prepared to pay quite a bit for it. However, the benefit of living in the city itself or an immediate suburb: you can walk anywhere, or for work just walk to the T, and take a ride.

Personally, I prefer the further out west suburbs, as there are lots of trees outside my windows, and a river out back. :-)

Overall, Eastern MA is a great place to live, be paleo, be physically active, and (hypothetically for me, but I've seen it happen) raise a family. So so so many pro's - only con: expensive.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 02, 2013
at 04:57 PM

Wow, I've found MA "refreshing" compared to other places I've lived. I always assumed the sea air helped (compared to lakes or rivers).

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on May 02, 2013
at 04:32 PM

I live in the greater Boston area, have done for 3 years and am miserable for almost all of the reasons the OP listed, and can't wait to leave. The humidity alone is a killer deal-breaker, I'll leave it at that rather than offend the whole of Massachusetts with my unhappy list.

800e726cb5dff569fd8edf604c3e2793

(1655)

on May 01, 2013
at 06:52 PM

If the OP feels the humidity is too high in Texas... that might be a deal-killer for MA.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on May 03, 2013
at 06:08 AM

I just moved from Boston back to Texas, after 10 long years. It's a great state but low humidity is much worse than high and its low all winter. Your skin peels and your eyes burn. People get depressed from low sunlight all winter and everyone is massively Vitamin D deficient. Good schools in 95 belt (Newton, Lexington, etc) run ~$400/sf for junk. $325k isn't even close. Lived in Worcester and MetroWest too. Don't go there.

F3eee6d7dab709e3b17c7f43f8ec2ef0

(0)

on May 02, 2013
at 01:31 PM

This is fascinating ... thank you!

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 01, 2013
at 07:40 PM

Boise, Idaho. (shhhh...don't tell anyone else-it's that amazing!)

0
5583b82f29a6b24264ca4b9836abd925

(261)

on May 01, 2013
at 07:37 PM

I live in southern Kentucky now and plan on moving to Nashville with the rest of my family. To me, Nashville is one of the greatest places to live in the US. Cost of living isn't very expensive at all, we have plenty of access to local farmers markets, grain fed meets, etc. The weather here is great as well, few storms here and there but mostly very mild winter and summers! I know for a fact there's plenty of Tech jobs around, I have several friends that are software developers and work in Nashville, live in a GREAT area called Brentwood.

0
582e89904fef55ad5c7dac673653ef8c

(281)

on May 01, 2013
at 07:15 PM

I happen to live in Oregon. The only one this doesn't meet for you is humidity because it is very rainy in most parts and it gets humid. Other than that, beautiful air, trees, forests, hiking, swimming, camping, etc. Some places, however, do not get 4 discernible seasons. I can't comment on the software jobs either. There are lots of nice farms all over, delicious local eating, etc. It'd be worth a look into.

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