1

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Why do mosquitoes suddenly love me?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 28, 2012 at 8:59 PM

Since I can remember, while those around me got bitten, the mosquitoes would leave me alone. Now they suddenly love me. I was in a mosquito rich environment yesterday and have about 15 bites. This is the third time I'm covered in bites in the last couple months. I used to go through the whole summer with maybe 1 bite. What would cause such a change.

Paleo about 2 years. 51 years old, so could there be hormonal things going on?

EDIT: I just counted 29 bites, and they are all itchy and red. Heeeelllppp!

Medium avatar

(3024)

on September 01, 2013
at 04:25 AM

A naturopath suggested that maybe the mosquitoes changed in a certain locale, not me. I was bit up and down in a city I was visiting regularly. At home, still no bites. Travelled this summer to a different country - no bites.

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on July 29, 2012
at 11:46 PM

Rubbing Aspirin into the itchy spots is suppose to help...though I've never tried it...but if you have a ton of Aspirins that aren't going anywhere?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 29, 2012
at 03:04 PM

IIRC, the B vitamin is thiamin. But as a child I remember joking with my aunt that the reason she was bit so much was that she was so sweet (in disposition--not sure about the rest of her!).

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on July 29, 2012
at 09:25 AM

Mosquitoes can smell you from about 50 feet out...unless you can hold your breath permanent...or walk around in full HAZMAT gear? You might just have to Grok this one out and bathe in mud and stay hairy as to use those hairs as mosquitoe detectors!

Medium avatar

(3024)

on July 29, 2012
at 08:56 AM

But can a person change from breathing out very little CO2 to tons of it, and if so, is that a positive change or a negative one? Of course, it could be a completely different factor.

Medium avatar

(3024)

on July 29, 2012
at 06:20 AM

I heard from a reliable source many years ago that levels of one of the B vitamins (can't remember which) and sugar intake has an effect. My sugar intake was always relatively low, and is now lower, so I can't imagine I'd be very sweet.

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5 Answers

1
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on July 28, 2012
at 09:15 PM

I'm a little curious about what causes mosquitos to bite also. Too sweet, I guess? My sister-in-law said that she doesn't get bit much, as I recall, because of taking B vitamins. I also found this during a Google search that was enlightening. Hope it helps you!

Medium avatar

(3024)

on July 29, 2012
at 06:20 AM

I heard from a reliable source many years ago that levels of one of the B vitamins (can't remember which) and sugar intake has an effect. My sugar intake was always relatively low, and is now lower, so I can't imagine I'd be very sweet.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on July 29, 2012
at 03:04 PM

IIRC, the B vitamin is thiamin. But as a child I remember joking with my aunt that the reason she was bit so much was that she was so sweet (in disposition--not sure about the rest of her!).

0
4a4ee33e368c45b1eca7773b44d177a0

on August 27, 2013
at 11:32 PM

I have the same issue as OP. I never got bit.. I mean never. And I grew up in S. Louisiana. Traveled the world.. Including the mecan delta in SE. Asia and no bites. I returned to Houston, Tx last year and I'm getting ate alive!!! Something changed??

Also, on hair dryer comment.. You can use a cigarette too. Put the hot tip close enough to the bite, so it feels like it is about to burn but don't let it burn.. Two or three times and the itch and sting will stop in a few min. Old Marine Corp trick when in the feel. Anything Hot, if tour a non-smoker. :)

Medium avatar

(3024)

on September 01, 2013
at 04:25 AM

A naturopath suggested that maybe the mosquitoes changed in a certain locale, not me. I was bit up and down in a city I was visiting regularly. At home, still no bites. Travelled this summer to a different country - no bites.

0
3d94686d427c69bf653813e0371cd2b6

on July 29, 2012
at 11:17 PM

Helpful tip that changed my life: 7 or so seconds with a hairdryer on low aimed at the bite will stop the itching. I usually do it until the bite starts becoming a bit painful, then stop. Apparently it works by denaturing the enzymes from the mosquito's saliva.

Boom, mosquito bite itching is gone foreva.

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on July 29, 2012
at 11:46 PM

Rubbing Aspirin into the itchy spots is suppose to help...though I've never tried it...but if you have a ton of Aspirins that aren't going anywhere?

0
Caea19ebc8c7141168efe907881e0c3b

on July 29, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I have read before that people with a high concentration of cholesterol on their skin attract mosquitoes. (That doesn't mean they have a high total level of cholesterol, it's byproducts from processing or something). Also uric acid, lactic acid. Web MD has an article about it.

My mom is one of those people who gets swarmed by 'em. She'll have like 20 bites from watering the plants for five minutes, and I don't get any all day long.

0
76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

on July 29, 2012
at 07:02 AM

The carbon dioxide that you breathe out attracts mosquitoes...

I actually saw a test done that had a researcher position his mouth against a piece of mesh that was being used to substitue the wall of a container, on the other side, hungry mosquitoes. they used a type of scent that the mosquitoes liked to keep them to the other side of the same container and then had the researcher take a deep breath and then breath out normally...they came a running!

It looked like the old Looney Toons when bees gather together and form the giant fist, well it was like that, only these mosquitoes were a giant fist, wielding a knife!

If I can find the clip I'll post it, it's pretty cool in a creepy kinda way.

Truth.

Medium avatar

(3024)

on July 29, 2012
at 08:56 AM

But can a person change from breathing out very little CO2 to tons of it, and if so, is that a positive change or a negative one? Of course, it could be a completely different factor.

76026e8ef496039d5075440ff731aa0d

(5386)

on July 29, 2012
at 09:25 AM

Mosquitoes can smell you from about 50 feet out...unless you can hold your breath permanent...or walk around in full HAZMAT gear? You might just have to Grok this one out and bathe in mud and stay hairy as to use those hairs as mosquitoe detectors!

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