2

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Diet and exercise with a stress fracture?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 12, 2012 at 1:49 PM

I have a stress fracture in my foot which is dramatically changing what I can do. I'm an avid exerciser and prior to my foot misadventure 6 days a week I did P90X style workouts, kettle bells, lots of walking, intervals, occasional jogging, yoga etc. However, anything that requires significant pressure on my foot is out, I can barely walk even with the walking cast(aka moon boot).

So, I am looking for workout suggestions that involve minimal pressure on my foot...my arms are not broken! I feel like a slug if I don't get in some exercise. It is so depressing not to be able to go for long walks.

Diet suggestions are welcome too. I have been trying to lose that last 10lbs for a while...I am wondering if exercising too much was preventing that. I am currently doing a whole30 (on day 37 now) and also decided to cut out all nuts and nut butters during this time. So my diet is leafy greens and other veggies, grass fed beef, eggs, some chicken, coconut oil/butter and occasional winter squash.

I'd like not to put on any additional body fat while in my moon boot and still be able to workout...suggestions?

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I supplement with Vit D and magnesium and I eat boat loads of leafy greens so I should be good to go on the A & K. I'll have a Vit D checked at work though, just in case.

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:39 PM

I have a pool but I am not much of a swimmer, probaly even less with a broken flipper :) I hate the thought of having to go to a gym to use machines. I have a home gym with free weights, a squat rack, kettle bells, TRX, sandbag, treadmill, spin bike, pull up bar and resistance bands. Sadly, many of these require use of my broken flipper.

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:36 PM

I am going to searcch for the article now...thanks!

  • A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

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6 Answers

1
62fafa8cb15af7c562fa8c270f7b6174

on August 19, 2012
at 04:34 PM

I've recovered from a few of these, and for exercise turn to the pull-up bar. Getting up and down on one good foot is pretty easy, and you have lots of options. Pull ups of various types, take this time to work towards something that was beyond you with static hangs. Toes to bar, knees to elbows, and even elbows to knees if you're confident (hanging from your knees/calves.

For therapy, I become more religious with the foam roller to release my calf muscles. Tendons put incredible strain on small bones of the foot. Remodeling of one bone area to cope with this inevitably steals calcium from another area. I've had stress fractures of the styloid process on my pinky-toe on both feet due to tight/overtrained calves.

I rely on these techniques because my circulation is kind of shot in my lower legs, so recover/repair doesn't happen well without some help. Before getting out of bed every morning, and putting weight on my feet, I trigger-point massage each calf on the opposite knee to keep plantar fascitis at bay. Keeping the surrounding muscles well fed and happy is key to any repetitive stress injury like a stress fracture.

0
07c86972a3bea0b0dc17752e9d2f5642

on August 20, 2012
at 03:41 AM

Move around on the floor and crawl around. Roll in the grass. Do body weight exercises on your back, put your feet up in the air and raise and lower, twirl them around, do scissor motions, etc. See if you can go swimming in a brace so your foot isn't hurt by the drag of the water.

I've seen people in moon boots on raised scooters that they kneel on and push with their good foot.

0
F15e0bae42dbf0b8cfc71e62902497b4

on August 13, 2012
at 05:42 AM

An arm-bike would be easiest. Your gym may have one of these tucked in a corner somewhere http://www.amazon.com/MagneTrainer-ER-Mini-Exercise-Bike-Exerciser/dp/B000V53KD8 just stick it on the table, sit down and get your arms going.

Weight training with your arms would be good too, but think more towards the (boring, CW) small isolated muscle exercises that you can do while sitting.

0
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on August 12, 2012
at 05:27 PM

I actually found being off my foot (ligament tear = 6 weeks in a boot + 6 weeks PT) helped me fine-tune my diet. I wasn't worrying so much about fueling performance at that point and I could kind of tweak my intake for better health. (Granted, during that time I noticed more food sensitivities, that's icky.)

Definitely make sure you get enough Vit D!

I didn't snack. That was the most challenging thing for me because I was used to eating after working out. BUT, I got some good habits out of that.

I also focused on resting more (sleeping) and dealing with my stress levels.

Anyway, I was SO glad to be able to start working out on my own again (a few weeks ago). But, working on other aspects of my life was helpful in keeping myself from going crazy when I was in the boot.

Until you can put a little weight on your leg, don't push yourself too hard. You need to focus on healing first, I think. Have you seen the article on the Whole9 site about what to do when you're banged up? It's worth a read.

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:36 PM

I am going to searcch for the article now...thanks!

0
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on August 12, 2012
at 05:15 PM

Ouch! To help your bones heal fast, get your D level tested & sun/supplement to 60-80 ng/ml. Also make sure you are getting sufficient Magnesium (200-600 mg), as well as Vitamins A & K.

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:40 PM

I supplement with Vit D and magnesium and I eat boat loads of leafy greens so I should be good to go on the A & K. I'll have a Vit D checked at work though, just in case.

0
81fca18329e68e227cdfef3857bfef96

(1320)

on August 12, 2012
at 04:54 PM

Wow, foot injury...well other than fight through it or the dreaded rest advice, swimming comes to mind. Perhaps a stationary bike would be tolerable.

Other than that, just figure out through trial and error what you can or can't do. Definitely eliminate anything that requires your foot to impact the ground (running, jumps, maybe even walking).

I hate to recommend isometric exercises, but do machine lifts to maintain strength in your legs. Leg curls/extensions should not put any pressure on your foot.

Injuries suck but a reality for those that train. I pulled a hamstring and aggravated a shoulder which now has chronic inflammation. Good luck with yours.

A3a4696c919e916ec971691559e9c942

(2043)

on August 12, 2012
at 06:39 PM

I have a pool but I am not much of a swimmer, probaly even less with a broken flipper :) I hate the thought of having to go to a gym to use machines. I have a home gym with free weights, a squat rack, kettle bells, TRX, sandbag, treadmill, spin bike, pull up bar and resistance bands. Sadly, many of these require use of my broken flipper.

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