6

votes

Modern paleos: How important is money to you?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 17, 2010 at 3:07 PM

As a modern paleo, do you place less emphasis on money than the average Joe or Josephine? Other than expensive groceries, what do you spend money on?

Money seems to be involved in almost all our decisions as modern men and women. Money is also the driving force behind modern agricultural practices of squeezing the land for all its worth, sacrificing sustainability and health.

I would imagine that paleo man shared more and did things more communally. Some really cool modern ideas such as skills shares, simple barters, and unstructured playing seem to have a link with more ancient ways of doing things. Our modern financial system seems very far removed from a paleo way of organizing a society.

My hunch is that we place less emphasis on accumulating wealth than the average person. Enough money for security and comfort is great, but I don't see signs of money-grubbing in the paleo community. Plenty of informative, free blogs. Only a handful of gurus selling e-books.

ADD ON QUESTION: What goods and services, requiring some cash, have most helped you in your paleo lifestyle? My number one would be the slow cooker. I might get more massages in the future too, and/or buy a nice food processor.

091423a30c0188fbff51e39397e7e056

(384)

on October 20, 2012
at 01:29 AM

I think he means that your hunch is based mostly upon your positive opinion of paleos (since you self-associate) than with anything remotely associated with fact. Your evidence can be found and applied to almost any sub-group.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on December 13, 2010
at 10:16 PM

@jpet, I agree completely. Wealth is not a zero-sum game.

5c14d1ca9a7f98d0be7c5a828410d146

(307)

on December 13, 2010
at 10:09 PM

The accumulation of resources (in our world, money is a big one) is not only the result of healthy ambition, intelligence and hard work, it opens even more opportunities for both the accumulator and for other people. There can never be too much of that IMO.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on December 13, 2010
at 09:13 PM

@Kamal, what the 1000 billionaires do with their wealth, as long as it was legally acquired, is no business of ours. However you define "paleo," I'm sure that class envy is not (nor should it be) part of the definition.

9c215d66a663fbae3a16cf5515889d7f

(260)

on December 13, 2010
at 09:01 PM

You've probably already looked into this, but you may be able to get a better price going straight to the farm. I'm lucky enough to live close to Polyface Farms in VA. They sell ground beef at the farm store for $4.50/lb. The local health food store sells it for something like $8.50. I think it's even that much at the butcher shop that does the actual processing (the poultry is processed on-site). Most people I see at the farm live a couple of hours away and lug in huge coolers to stock up.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Maybe, but there are limitations to accumulation if one is at all nomadic.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:10 PM

So, I guess what we're saying, here, is that the paleo lifestyle (small band of people sharing resources and labor) which worked for millions of years is broken and no longer works? Geez, I'm *trying* to put down that cup of sugar-laden industrially-colored artificial fruit beverage. So what if it doesn't work on a large scale? It can work on a small scale - it did and it does! No one scheme will work for everyone but *it doesn't have to.* I'm with you Stephen-Aegis.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 03:25 PM

This isn't about impressing people, it is about the marginal benefit of wealth accumulation above what you would use. There's about 1000 billionaires in the world. The amount they use for good health and fancy toys, along with helping non-profits, doesn't approach a billion. The lion's share is essentially horded away. Didn't Bill Gates try to encourage a bunch of German billionaires to donate more, and they said no? My thought is that paleo people place more emphasis on using money for health and happiness, and less to impress or be the best (in terms of wealth).

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:41 AM

Also, behavioral economists have done cool game theory stuff, mapping different approximations of kindness and self-interest onto a mine-sweeper type grid. Universally kind people (well, grid units) die off first, then really unkind people, then adaptable people. This makes me think that the environment could really affect our decisions on things, and thus the political/economic backbone of societies greatly affect its assumptions on how these "utopian" systems may work. We're 99% sure paleo is the healthiest diet, but the healthiest/happiest societal arrangement...who knows??

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:12 AM

Eva- I agree. However, I understand that the brain plasticity is way greater than imagined twenty years ago. Thus, it may just be conventional wisdom that says changing innate laziness is impossible. There was a section in "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", I believe, discussing how many/all humans have the capacity for mindful enjoyment of work.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Patrik- "Island" really is a great book for challenging conventional wisdom (at least for my high school self, if I recall correctly). They taught kids basic logic, problem solving, and the like before things like multiplication tables. Irrational negativity was seen as a problem and often discussed. Politics and economics were similarly shaped by both logic and kindness. Not necessarily realistic for changing the world we live in, unless you're John Galt, but applicable to small-medium groups and great conversation fodder

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Kamal, I think it is a nice dream, but will never work on a large scale as long humans are the way they are. I mean, unless some great diety intervenes, too many humans are either too lazy to work hard unless they get most of the profits for themselves or are very ready to take unfairly large amounts of profits from others. There has never been a way to successfully change the way a large percentages of human nature seems to function. And so the dream remains a dream.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Patrik- "Island" really is a great book for challenging conventional wisdom (at least for my high school self, if I recall correctly). They taught kids basic logic, problem solving, and the like before things like multiplication tables. Irrational negativity was seen as a problem as often discussed. Politics and economics were similarly shaped by both logic and kindness. Not necessarily realistic for changing the world we live in, unless you're John Galt, but applicable to small-medium groups and great conversation fodder.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:04 AM

Patrik- you mean Mao type democide? Yeah, that sucks. I often wonder what would happen if innovation and effort was spent on seeing how sharing-type communities could be feasible (like is spent on investment products, marketing, etc), whether some viable systems would emerge.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:40 AM

@Kamal -- just re-thinking about your "major confounder" comment -- yeah, I got another one for you: Democide.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:38 AM

@Marina -- Sure, a large extended genetically related family, it could sorta work.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:37 AM

@Kamal -- "For a great fictional account of such a world," thank you for making my point for me!

7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on September 18, 2010
at 12:42 AM

It does work on kibbutzim to some extent. But it needs to be a small enough community, more like a large family.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:56 PM

Also, a bias indicates a lack of logic. The accumulation of wealth above one's reasonable comfort level, for sake of accumulating wealth, is not something that is universally supported by modern man. Andrew Carnegie was famous for starting his career with the intent to donate much/most of his wealth, as he despised such accumulation for its own sake.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:51 PM

True. I would much rather live in 2010 than 2010 BC, but still think our current financial system is not optimal for mean human welfare.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:49 PM

For a great fictional account of such a world, read "Island" by Aldous Huxley!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:48 PM

One could argue that major confounders got in the way when it was tried. The dominance of capitalism is in itself a confounder, as counties that are more socialist have to compete implicitly. I would be curious to see how a reborn world that was significantly more socialist with regards to public goods would fare. In addition, the vast majority of large corporations do not have to pay for bad effects of production (i.e. externalities), which is a tough area for straight capitalism to deal with.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2010
at 09:33 PM

"Fair exchange of materials but not handouts, where people care about their community as much as themselves..." Jeez. C'mon guys. This has already been tried in 10,000 different ways from kibbutzes to full-blow Communism. Bottom line: It doesn't work.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2010
at 09:32 PM

"I'd love to live in a society without the need for grubbing greed." and I'd love to ride a unicorn into a supernova.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2010
at 09:30 PM

This question reeks of Noble Savage bias....just saying...

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on September 17, 2010
at 07:56 PM

I like your attitude :-) I'll buy your book!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 03:39 PM

Caring and sharing really is cool, and has very few adverse effects to boot. Man, those Care Bears were really ahead of their time.

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 17, 2010
at 03:32 PM

"I'd love to live in a society without the need for grubbing greed. Fair exchange of materials but not handouts, where people care about their community as much as themselves..." Sounds brilliant. Perhaps we should start a paleo-kibbutz!

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15 Answers

5
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on September 17, 2010
at 03:18 PM

I need money for necessities. Shelter, Clothing and far most importantly Healthy Food.

Other than that it's about minor equipment for entertainment. Kayak, Frisbee, Volleyball etc.

I don't really watch tv anymore. I'm not concerning with impressing people with my social status(health status is another story)

I'd love to live in a society without the need for grubbing greed. Fair exchange of materials but not handouts, where people care about their community as much as themselves...

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:40 AM

@Kamal -- just re-thinking about your "major confounder" comment -- yeah, I got another one for you: Democide.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:12 AM

Eva- I agree. However, I understand that the brain plasticity is way greater than imagined twenty years ago. Thus, it may just be conventional wisdom that says changing innate laziness is impossible. There was a section in "Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance", I believe, discussing how many/all humans have the capacity for mindful enjoyment of work.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2010
at 09:33 PM

"Fair exchange of materials but not handouts, where people care about their community as much as themselves..." Jeez. C'mon guys. This has already been tried in 10,000 different ways from kibbutzes to full-blow Communism. Bottom line: It doesn't work.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:37 AM

@Kamal -- "For a great fictional account of such a world," thank you for making my point for me!

7df8f3cc7f1475c3ecbbd4a4feb87d04

(514)

on September 18, 2010
at 12:42 AM

It does work on kibbutzim to some extent. But it needs to be a small enough community, more like a large family.

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 18, 2010
at 02:38 AM

@Marina -- Sure, a large extended genetically related family, it could sorta work.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:49 PM

For a great fictional account of such a world, read "Island" by Aldous Huxley!

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Kamal, I think it is a nice dream, but will never work on a large scale as long humans are the way they are. I mean, unless some great diety intervenes, too many humans are either too lazy to work hard unless they get most of the profits for themselves or are very ready to take unfairly large amounts of profits from others. There has never been a way to successfully change the way a large percentages of human nature seems to function. And so the dream remains a dream.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Patrik- "Island" really is a great book for challenging conventional wisdom (at least for my high school self, if I recall correctly). They taught kids basic logic, problem solving, and the like before things like multiplication tables. Irrational negativity was seen as a problem and often discussed. Politics and economics were similarly shaped by both logic and kindness. Not necessarily realistic for changing the world we live in, unless you're John Galt, but applicable to small-medium groups and great conversation fodder

A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 17, 2010
at 03:32 PM

"I'd love to live in a society without the need for grubbing greed. Fair exchange of materials but not handouts, where people care about their community as much as themselves..." Sounds brilliant. Perhaps we should start a paleo-kibbutz!

93f44e8673d3ea2294cce085ebc96e13

(10502)

on September 17, 2010
at 09:32 PM

"I'd love to live in a society without the need for grubbing greed." and I'd love to ride a unicorn into a supernova.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:10 PM

So, I guess what we're saying, here, is that the paleo lifestyle (small band of people sharing resources and labor) which worked for millions of years is broken and no longer works? Geez, I'm *trying* to put down that cup of sugar-laden industrially-colored artificial fruit beverage. So what if it doesn't work on a large scale? It can work on a small scale - it did and it does! No one scheme will work for everyone but *it doesn't have to.* I'm with you Stephen-Aegis.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 03:39 PM

Caring and sharing really is cool, and has very few adverse effects to boot. Man, those Care Bears were really ahead of their time.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 17, 2010
at 11:48 PM

One could argue that major confounders got in the way when it was tried. The dominance of capitalism is in itself a confounder, as counties that are more socialist have to compete implicitly. I would be curious to see how a reborn world that was significantly more socialist with regards to public goods would fare. In addition, the vast majority of large corporations do not have to pay for bad effects of production (i.e. externalities), which is a tough area for straight capitalism to deal with.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:04 AM

Patrik- you mean Mao type democide? Yeah, that sucks. I often wonder what would happen if innovation and effort was spent on seeing how sharing-type communities could be feasible (like is spent on investment products, marketing, etc), whether some viable systems would emerge.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:41 AM

Also, behavioral economists have done cool game theory stuff, mapping different approximations of kindness and self-interest onto a mine-sweeper type grid. Universally kind people (well, grid units) die off first, then really unkind people, then adaptable people. This makes me think that the environment could really affect our decisions on things, and thus the political/economic backbone of societies greatly affect its assumptions on how these "utopian" systems may work. We're 99% sure paleo is the healthiest diet, but the healthiest/happiest societal arrangement...who knows??

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:09 AM

Patrik- "Island" really is a great book for challenging conventional wisdom (at least for my high school self, if I recall correctly). They taught kids basic logic, problem solving, and the like before things like multiplication tables. Irrational negativity was seen as a problem as often discussed. Politics and economics were similarly shaped by both logic and kindness. Not necessarily realistic for changing the world we live in, unless you're John Galt, but applicable to small-medium groups and great conversation fodder.

4
50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on December 13, 2010
at 09:44 PM

I actually stumbled upon "Paleo" by some round about way that dealt with finances. I had been starting to pay attention to the economy and what was wrong with it a couple years back. I can't remember the exact sequence, but I found Marks Daily Apple (about a year ago) through a link on a link and the rest is history.

I have found that the Paleo lifestyle very directly ties with my views on society, finance, health and wellness etc..

I no longer feel the drive to have extra things, to qualify for marathons, to buy the latest fitness gear. Now I just want to eat great food, look amazing doing it, play outdoors, and sleep a lot.... It's actually quite liberating.

3
03db20f160e58814827ae5a05a5c8792

on September 17, 2010
at 10:29 PM

You can never have enough money.Why? You need money not only for big cars and expensive clothes, furniture or PCs which I don't need but for "non-profit issues" as well: good food, improving health, good trainers and doctors, seminars and books and tutorial DVDs for becoming a better professional and a smarter person, support non- profit organizations and grassroot movements, living a social life and for your social security in general.

If you don't need money to impress people or to prove that you are a "winner"- good for you. But you need money for everything that is worth doing, even if it's not business but only non-profit projects or supporting other people.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on September 18, 2010
at 03:25 PM

This isn't about impressing people, it is about the marginal benefit of wealth accumulation above what you would use. There's about 1000 billionaires in the world. The amount they use for good health and fancy toys, along with helping non-profits, doesn't approach a billion. The lion's share is essentially horded away. Didn't Bill Gates try to encourage a bunch of German billionaires to donate more, and they said no? My thought is that paleo people place more emphasis on using money for health and happiness, and less to impress or be the best (in terms of wealth).

5c14d1ca9a7f98d0be7c5a828410d146

(307)

on December 13, 2010
at 10:09 PM

The accumulation of resources (in our world, money is a big one) is not only the result of healthy ambition, intelligence and hard work, it opens even more opportunities for both the accumulator and for other people. There can never be too much of that IMO.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on December 13, 2010
at 10:16 PM

@jpet, I agree completely. Wealth is not a zero-sum game.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11478)

on December 13, 2010
at 09:13 PM

@Kamal, what the 1000 billionaires do with their wealth, as long as it was legally acquired, is no business of ours. However you define "paleo," I'm sure that class envy is not (nor should it be) part of the definition.

3
145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

on September 17, 2010
at 07:55 PM

At my age (60) and as a CPA, I have decided that nothing is more important to me than NOT having to eat cat food in my dotage (and that my "dotage" be short and happy). Hence a major emphasis toward saving everything I can get my hands on. I also do not want to be a burden on my children, who, while I love them dearly, live a lifestyle that is 100% incompatible with my choices.

Secondary goal (but not far behind) is to get out of the rat race (e.g. retire) so I can spend more time doing what I want to do instead of what other people want me to do. Life is short and (in my way of thinking) final.

As a CPA, my experience with clients tells me that money is only important if you don't have enough, but "enough" is defined differently by different people (particularly at different age levels, and now I would add, at different choices of diet).

I have found a reasonably affordable source of grass-fed beef and pastured eggs, so I'm set. I look for the best chicken and pork I can find, but I'm mainly a beef-eater, so that's where I spend my resources.

3
D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on September 17, 2010
at 04:19 PM

Money is a big factor in limiting our family's ability to do full-on paleo / primal - still trying to find/source affordable grass-fed beef, pork, poultry, etc., pastured eggs, pastured raw dairy. The only thing I can think of to take the edge off for next year is to start my own garden.

Let's just say that for two adults and two young children I'm still strugging to stay under $700-800/mo. on groceries! Even grass fed ground beef (the only grass fed beef I've bought so far) in my area runs $6/lb. - not cheap.

I'd rather spend money on quality food than almost anything else.

9c215d66a663fbae3a16cf5515889d7f

(260)

on December 13, 2010
at 09:01 PM

You've probably already looked into this, but you may be able to get a better price going straight to the farm. I'm lucky enough to live close to Polyface Farms in VA. They sell ground beef at the farm store for $4.50/lb. The local health food store sells it for something like $8.50. I think it's even that much at the butcher shop that does the actual processing (the poultry is processed on-site). Most people I see at the farm live a couple of hours away and lug in huge coolers to stock up.

2
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 28, 2011
at 06:05 AM

I've been self-employed for almost 20 years. Not the most secure gig that's for sure. Still what I find the most rewarding is not the money but the freedom. I feel a confidence that I can rely on myself- that I can solve most problems. I feel more flexible with my needs and more able to adapt to changing times or changing myself. In fact the more insecure my position with regards to money, the more I find ways to beat the money game. Makes me feel wily and smart.

As a matter of fact going Paleo is one of the best money game hacks for me. Can't afford medical insurance. Became healthy and saved a bunch of wasted anxiety laden payments to corporate insurance companies. Use $$ saved to invest in my business, or whatever my priorities are. Money is only as important as you need it to be. Sometimes more sometimes less. Just don't let it box you in. Thanks for the question. Enjoyed it:)

2
2e060a5edde44c1fe77abcf8d3997e01

on September 17, 2010
at 09:28 PM

I do wish I had enough money to go pure grass-fed/pastured.

I also wish I had the money to buy some new clothes now that I dropped 60lbs. I look like a clown in XXL.

2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on September 17, 2010
at 07:01 PM

Accumulation of resources is a natural paleo desire. More resources means more security. Unfortunately, taken out of the natural context of the wilds and the tribe, sometimes this drive becomes unbalanced. Perhaps the paleo eater's concern of natural balance and keeping things in context helps ameliorate this danger to some extent.

5841391284e7af8c495c54bd90d3a795

(2764)

on September 18, 2010
at 04:16 PM

Maybe, but there are limitations to accumulation if one is at all nomadic.

1
A8d95f3744a7a0885894ee0731c9744c

(3761)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

I agree. Generally, the paleo community seems pretty easy going. I'll be honest, though, I'm totally interested in money. Maybe not to such an extent that I'm greedy, but I do want to provide well for my family.

I spend extra money on groceries to improve my health and longevity, and money makes it all the more fun! I mean, lets face it, there's a lot of fun stuff to do when you have some extra cash.

With that said, I don't think the monetization of information regarding a diet or lifestyle that can greatly benefit our culture, and even cure disease is super kosher (with the exception of informative reading, i.e. Dr. Cordain's works, Robb Wolf's book, etc.).

I also think that our financial system has evolved to fit the need of the growing population. I could see communal living and bartering being somewhat difficult in today's vastly overpopulated world.

1
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on March 28, 2011
at 06:49 AM

I value time more then money. But I have to say that I make a normal living. We earn enough to pay the necessities (food, house, clothes, ...). We even have a little surplus, which we use for savings and to by time. Time to do what makes us happy.

1
61b801de5dc345b557cd4623d4a4f26b

(2682)

on December 13, 2010
at 08:09 PM

I don't think paleo people think of money any differently than the average person. We all want to accumulate wealth for some reason or another, be it health or greed...or both.

1
691f120a3e7a1a036845d105d86c99a3

(3641)

on September 17, 2010
at 03:23 PM

Or necessary equipment! After a life of consumer electronics and mp3 buying, you come to realize you don't have a lot of useful things. Buying a hunting bow and all the trappings seems to cost a lot of money, thus, I value money. I guess I need to start writing my E-book!

145d4b0f988af15acc6b26eccc1f4895

(1932)

on September 17, 2010
at 07:56 PM

I like your attitude :-) I'll buy your book!

0
5b4fd1d0dcb02b1cc3c666ece9e5983d

(1169)

on August 07, 2011
at 12:52 AM

Crossfit gyms, grass-fed and pastured meats and some of the hardware (Vibrams) can be expensive. The ideal, optimized diet may be at a cost that is greater by a factor of 2 for the average American's food expenditure. I feel like this puts the Paleo diet out of the price point of those less affluent Americans who suffer from diseases related to Industrial Foods (diabetes, obesity, etc.) and would therefore benefit most from the primal diet/lifestyle.

Snickers and a 80oz of Coca-Cola can be had at any gas station for .99 cents - Grass Fed Ribeye is 29.00 a pound at Whole Foods.

Money (financial security) allows us to focus on the higher order needs on that Maslov hierarchy of needs framework, well-being.

PS: Love the question. Economic sociology is my thing.

0
9f2b5def0bc7fd8ad615637d1ffeb9ec

on December 13, 2010
at 11:00 PM

Money is neither good nor bad-- it's just a very powerful tool to get things done. I'd love to have lots of money if I could use it for the greater good (for that matter I'd like anybody to have money if they were good people).

The problem stems from when people believe that money is itself good, or that having more of it makes you a better person. And if you have bad people with money, then you have a big problem.

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10034c23f65addc5735eb02a32448223

(361)

on December 13, 2010
at 08:52 PM

Its better to spend the money on good food than medicines! What say you?

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