5

votes

Minimalist paleo diet

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 23, 2012 at 4:47 PM

Hi all I am looking for advice on a simple diet with a minimal number of food items that will still be very strong from a nutritional standpoint. My list so far looks like this:

Sweet potatoes

Coconut oil

Shellfish

ground meat (grassfed)

bone broth

Broccoli/spinach/cabbage

apple cider vinegar (for digestion)

As for vitamins and minerals, have I covered all my bases, or am I missing anything significant. Is there anything on this list that I need not include. Or any foods which I have not listed that would be very beneficial.

Also if I have constipation issues, would it be worthwhile to try cilium husk or a digestive enzyme. The apple cider vinegar has been helping a bit but I am still not as regular as I'd like to be.

44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

(238)

on November 26, 2012
at 08:52 AM

It's cheap, it has beneficial antioxidants and other nutrients, it's low calorie, it tastes great, it takes no preparing, etc

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 25, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Why fruit, exactly?

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 25, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Andrew, you've hit upon a conundrum. Most nutrient-dense veggies have this goitrogenic characteristic. Personally, I eat a serving of "goitrogenic" veggies daily (7x/week), but I also supplement a bit with kelp-based iodine. I like spaghetti squash as an alternative, loaded with lard and grated parmesan, or buried in a coconut milk curry sauce.

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 24, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Thanks Matt. Can you comment on which vegetables you think are best (high in nutrients but low in toxic compounds).

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on November 24, 2012
at 02:42 PM

I think the nutrients would hold up just fine.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 24, 2012
at 01:48 PM

Peas are probably fine if you're not sensitive to legumes (most people are completely fine with legumes). Same with edible pod beans.

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 24, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Can you recommend other vegetables that are nutrient dense but are not goitrogenic. I have been advised to try green peas in the past but avoided this since it is a legume and many do not consider this paleo-safe.

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 23, 2012
at 09:42 PM

So I should at least add liver for K2. What if my meat and veggies were previously frozen (as if I made a big stew and lived off that for a week or so)? How would this effect the nutrients and would this open up any holes in my diet?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 23, 2012
at 08:14 PM

This gets asked nearly weekly. Do a search, there's dozens of similar questions.

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7 Answers

4
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on November 23, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Ditto on the Liver and butter.

Vitamin D3 supplement in the winter or higher latitudes year-round. More info at www.vitamindcouncil.org

Magnesium Citrate 400-600 mg before bed. Hard to get from food sources, will ease any constipation & help with sleep and Vitamin D co-factor.

Occasional citrus fruit for vitamin C, since you will need to cook your veggies, if you have digestive issues.

3
29518a2572c5fe3a851170a9b1c315f3

on November 23, 2012
at 07:41 PM

I would maybe have added sardines. Good source of omega 3 and calcium.

2
93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on November 23, 2012
at 06:47 PM

I would add in grass-fed liver at least once a week because it is highly nutritious. Also kale is a good green if you get bored with the others. Also grass-fed butter for K2 if you'd like. Lastly to switch up the starches I add in butternut squash when it is in season!

Looks good tho! Have fun!

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 23, 2012
at 09:42 PM

So I should at least add liver for K2. What if my meat and veggies were previously frozen (as if I made a big stew and lived off that for a week or so)? How would this effect the nutrients and would this open up any holes in my diet?

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on November 24, 2012
at 02:42 PM

I think the nutrients would hold up just fine.

1
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 24, 2012
at 04:15 AM

Track your food intake for two weeks in your favorite nutrition app. You'll be able to see if your macro- and micro-nutrient intake is on target. Speaking of micro-nutrient intake, don't count the calcium in spinach; it's barely absorbable.

Also, where's the variety in fat coming from in your listed foods? Coconut oil has a fairly narrow list of fats you need. Sardines, mackerel, and wild salmon will give you some omega-3 fats, but consider rendering your own lard and tallow from clean pork and beef fat. Those fats are complex and provide a wide range of beneficial lipids.

I would also recommend you incorporate some ground chia seed into your ground beef dishes. Chia seed's chockful of the electrolyte minerals. Also, because it sucks up a lot of moisture, it works well as a binder in meatloaf.

Also, be careful with the veggies you mentioned and the kale recommended by another poster. All of them are goitrogenic, meaning they produce compounds in the body that ultimately suppress the thyroid (either production of its hormones or conversion to the active form of the hormones). You can read Chris Masterjohn's seminal article for more details and his recommendations (a max of five servings/week of these veggies).

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 24, 2012
at 05:32 PM

Thanks Matt. Can you comment on which vegetables you think are best (high in nutrients but low in toxic compounds).

00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on November 25, 2012
at 03:32 AM

Andrew, you've hit upon a conundrum. Most nutrient-dense veggies have this goitrogenic characteristic. Personally, I eat a serving of "goitrogenic" veggies daily (7x/week), but I also supplement a bit with kelp-based iodine. I like spaghetti squash as an alternative, loaded with lard and grated parmesan, or buried in a coconut milk curry sauce.

119b9ca51cae1066fb8f51b5d029a5b2

(224)

on November 24, 2012
at 12:35 PM

Can you recommend other vegetables that are nutrient dense but are not goitrogenic. I have been advised to try green peas in the past but avoided this since it is a legume and many do not consider this paleo-safe.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on November 24, 2012
at 01:48 PM

Peas are probably fine if you're not sensitive to legumes (most people are completely fine with legumes). Same with edible pod beans.

1
74786bbe8254844304a33943290c4d6d

on November 24, 2012
at 03:25 AM

Sardines, mackerel.

0
44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

on November 25, 2012
at 09:03 AM

Add some fruit and you're good. Maybe a tiny bit of liver or kidney a few times a week would help as well.

0382fa263de4c83328dc34a56e25437f

(4238)

on November 25, 2012
at 12:48 PM

Why fruit, exactly?

44894358c1cd33674c22850cc9368959

(238)

on November 26, 2012
at 08:52 AM

It's cheap, it has beneficial antioxidants and other nutrients, it's low calorie, it tastes great, it takes no preparing, etc

0
A7925ab8ea44e6d4d5d7c6f202632c6c

(404)

on November 25, 2012
at 07:28 AM

dead animals in various forms...

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