1

votes

Raw cheese; are the natural GH's still intact?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 24, 2012 at 4:40 PM

Are the naturally occurring growth hormones that come in raw milk still intact after the processing and aging that takes place in producing raw cheese?

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I doubt the hormones would survive digestion anyway. An insignificant amount maybe

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 24, 2012
at 08:59 PM

I see, well much of the hormonal effects of dairy products are probably not due to hormones but hormonal stimulation by the proteins and maybe the calcium. Based on this I would think cheese would still promote growth hormones to increase, but this is just speculation and I think Mat Lalonde and some epidemiology disagrees with me.

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 24, 2012
at 08:14 PM

And I was referring to the hormones that the animal produces naturally to feed a newborn; assumed that it would benefit me as well even though by nature an adult mammal shouldn't be consuming infant food, especially from a different biological order.

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 24, 2012
at 08:11 PM

Yeah, actually I was hoping it would have a lot intact because that's the deciding factor of whether or not I'm going to keep on investing in Raw Goat Cheese or start investing in supplements.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Well, the default paleo opinion is that our food is out to kill us all!

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 24, 2012
at 06:40 PM

Yeah, I almost wrote that I doubted it was a bad or good thing. I sort of assumed the implication was bad, but I guess I don't know.

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 24, 2012
at 06:27 PM

I wonder if elektrosaman was wondering if it was a good thing.

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2 Answers

2
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 24, 2012
at 05:31 PM

Yes: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0308814697001507

Although they're in such low quantities that I doubt this is a bad thing.

EDIT

I realized the study I cited doesn't appear to have looked at Insulin-like growth factor-1 levels. IGF-1 is a growth hormone people bring up a lot when talking about milk.

This study found that the process of making yogurt reduced milk IGF-1 levels significantly. I bet cheese production also lowers IGF-1 levels, but I still don't think the IGF-1 levels in dairy are significant enough to worry about (2).

0a9ad4e577fe24a6b8aafa1dd7a50c79

(5150)

on August 25, 2012
at 01:02 AM

I doubt the hormones would survive digestion anyway. An insignificant amount maybe

194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on August 24, 2012
at 06:27 PM

I wonder if elektrosaman was wondering if it was a good thing.

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 24, 2012
at 08:11 PM

Yeah, actually I was hoping it would have a lot intact because that's the deciding factor of whether or not I'm going to keep on investing in Raw Goat Cheese or start investing in supplements.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 24, 2012
at 07:09 PM

Well, the default paleo opinion is that our food is out to kill us all!

Ee04db68fcab556868524acb55ac5fd4

on August 24, 2012
at 08:14 PM

And I was referring to the hormones that the animal produces naturally to feed a newborn; assumed that it would benefit me as well even though by nature an adult mammal shouldn't be consuming infant food, especially from a different biological order.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 24, 2012
at 08:59 PM

I see, well much of the hormonal effects of dairy products are probably not due to hormones but hormonal stimulation by the proteins and maybe the calcium. Based on this I would think cheese would still promote growth hormones to increase, but this is just speculation and I think Mat Lalonde and some epidemiology disagrees with me.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 24, 2012
at 06:40 PM

Yeah, I almost wrote that I doubted it was a bad or good thing. I sort of assumed the implication was bad, but I guess I don't know.

0
Eb6f3143de49aadcf361ccafb7988068

(0)

on July 29, 2013
at 04:25 PM

IGF1- the insulin like growth factor which is a by product of growth hormone in the body and is responsible for the main effects of growth hormone in adults is found primarily in the cassein protein of milk. Casein protein in milk makes up about 15 percent of the protein found in the milk however makes up over 90 percent of the protein found in cheese. Thus most of the igf1 found in milk get transferred to cheese. Which is great for those trying to get more igf1 in their diet. While ifg1 has been linked to cancer, it doesn't take an Einstein to see that if you're going to get cancer by increasing your igf1 from cheese then you would probably get it anyway. Igf1 is great for diabetics as it takes the place of insulin on insulin receptors and thus decreases sugar cravings.

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