2

votes

Is lactose free milk okay

Answered on November 22, 2017
Created September 27, 2011 at 7:42 AM

Hey there, I am asking myself if lactose free milk is ok in paleo? The main argument seems to be the effect of lactose?!

Thx a lot!

steve

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on February 15, 2013
at 05:54 PM

While it may be "tame," it is highly industrialized milk, and ultra pasturized. I would rather drink milk and take my own lactaid.

F4a6fc9f0b701e12cdf2ad5dadaeb2dd

(360)

on February 15, 2013
at 03:53 PM

My body is disturbed by galactose just as much as lactose.

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on September 28, 2011
at 08:44 AM

Good clarification greyman, though my previous recommendation still stands, first I would try fermented dairy (made from raw a2) and then a2 raw dairy if you really want milk. This is anecdotal but everyone I've known who has tried a2 raw milk because they had issues with dairy, ceased to have issues. Raw milk contains lactase, an enzyme that breaks down lactose. Lactase is killed of during the pasteurisation of milk, possibly making it harder for some to digest. I would expect that lactose free milk is pasteurised, and IMO this no longer makes it a whole food - i.e. it becomes a processed fo

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 27, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Where does lactase come from? Frankenstein's intestines? Not that cheese, yogurt, milk, etc. aren't modern industrial foods too... Almost everything we eat - including anything grown on a farm - is a neolithic food.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on September 27, 2011
at 02:39 PM

As far as frankenfoods go, lactose free milk is pretty tame. It's just milk with lactase injected into it; it's the exact same process that would take place in your intestines if you have the ability to produce lactase. If you aren't a mutant but still want to drink milk, lactose free milk isn't somehow worse than normal milk.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on September 27, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Lactose free milk is not carb free milk. It's just milk that has had lactase put into it, breaking up the lactose into glucose and galactose.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:41 PM

Spot on. I'd add that folks need to choose what actually works over nutritional dogma.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:14 PM

Why specifically it is good in that case? (I mean comparing with just not drinking milk at all). I am asking because I don't see the benefits and also don't have a knowledge about what is the effect after artificially remove the lactose component.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:11 PM

@Rhubarb: As I understand the question, the gist is whether it is ok to drink milk, in which the lactose was artificially removed (supposing one is not casein intolerant, in which case the answer is obviously no). I would be also curious to know that.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:10 PM

@Rhubarb: As I understand the question, the gist is whether it is ok to drink milk, in which the lactose was artificially removed (supposing one is not casein intolerant, in which case the answer is obviously no).

  • C97a6302e6cd99a6798658559eb37148

    asked by

    (63)
  • Views
    22.1K
  • Last Activity
    269D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

4
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on September 27, 2011
at 09:40 AM

It is a little more involved than any possible issues with lactose. At it's most basic the paleo argument against diary is that we didn't evolve drinking other animals milk, and we would of only consumed our mothers milk during early childhood, during a period of rapid growth.

The point of rapid growth is important in that there is an argument that the anabolic affect of milk, possibly due to the insulin like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) within it, may not be optimum for adults to consume - who aren't experiencing rapid growth - as obviously adults are fully grown. Of course it is the anabolic properties of milk that has made it popular with body builders and the like.

Then there is the issue of casein, a milk protein, that some people don't seem to deal with too well. It turns out that most cows in western herds have a mutated gene, and thus produce a casein called A1 - it appears that most people who have an issue with casein only have an issue the A1 variant. The other casein type is A2, and cows who do not have the previously mentioned mutated gene produce it in their milk, along with sheep and goats who don't have the mutated gene in their species. This is often why some people who don't do well on cows milk have no issue with goat or sheep milk.

And of course, back to your first point, some people are indeed lactose intolerant - meaning that they have issues breaking down the lactose in milk. I'm not that well read on lactose intolerance but it is my understanding that it could be due to inappropriate gut bacteria, and can be solved buy eating fermented dairy (yoghurt) that contains the bacteria to break down lactose, so said bacteria can begin to populate the gut.

I guess a discussion on dairy wouldn't be complete without mention of the African tribe, the Maasai. There diet was primarily made up of cows milk & blood and meat, and the tribe showed no signs of western disease. For what it's worth their cows produced A2 milk.

So should you consume dairy? It depends. How does it effect you? Not sure? Eliminate it for 30 - 60 days and then re-introduce it.

Personally if I was going to consume diary I would opt for it in it's fermented forms. If I was going to consume milk straight up it would be A2 raw, whether that be from cow, goat or sheep.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:11 PM

@Rhubarb: As I understand the question, the gist is whether it is ok to drink milk, in which the lactose was artificially removed (supposing one is not casein intolerant, in which case the answer is obviously no). I would be also curious to know that.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:41 PM

Spot on. I'd add that folks need to choose what actually works over nutritional dogma.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:10 PM

@Rhubarb: As I understand the question, the gist is whether it is ok to drink milk, in which the lactose was artificially removed (supposing one is not casein intolerant, in which case the answer is obviously no).

B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on September 28, 2011
at 08:44 AM

Good clarification greyman, though my previous recommendation still stands, first I would try fermented dairy (made from raw a2) and then a2 raw dairy if you really want milk. This is anecdotal but everyone I've known who has tried a2 raw milk because they had issues with dairy, ceased to have issues. Raw milk contains lactase, an enzyme that breaks down lactose. Lactase is killed of during the pasteurisation of milk, possibly making it harder for some to digest. I would expect that lactose free milk is pasteurised, and IMO this no longer makes it a whole food - i.e. it becomes a processed fo

2
Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Lactose free milk is a Neolithic frankenfood. If you want a more natural lactose free dairy product eat cheese. As suggested, also consider eating fermented milk products such as yogurt, buttermilk and sour cream. The bacteria convert a lot of the lactose into lactic acid, reducing the glycemic index substantially. Unsweetened yogurt has an index of 15-20, vs the equivalent milk at 40-50. It's not as low as fat and protein (0 index), but it's an improvement.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on September 27, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Where does lactase come from? Frankenstein's intestines? Not that cheese, yogurt, milk, etc. aren't modern industrial foods too... Almost everything we eat - including anything grown on a farm - is a neolithic food.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on September 27, 2011
at 02:39 PM

As far as frankenfoods go, lactose free milk is pretty tame. It's just milk with lactase injected into it; it's the exact same process that would take place in your intestines if you have the ability to produce lactase. If you aren't a mutant but still want to drink milk, lactose free milk isn't somehow worse than normal milk.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on February 15, 2013
at 05:54 PM

While it may be "tame," it is highly industrialized milk, and ultra pasturized. I would rather drink milk and take my own lactaid.

0
3ffbf2090965ddf2dcfd16c4c1fffb58

on November 22, 2017
at 08:37 AM

Well, if you are a lactose intolerant, you feel stomach upset after having regular milk than lactose free milk is best option. One can also have rice milk, soy milk, coconut milk as alternative, if not than lactose free milk can be very best option instead of cutting of milk from your diet due to lactose intolerence.

0
4aace90f59245c77d437c0333eda079e

on April 23, 2016
at 03:06 PM

First look at the fact that 75% of the worlds population is lactose intolerant. Asians, Africans and African Americans more so. 

You can't reverse genetics...yet, lol. On rare occasions I use lactose milk from grass fed cows. Very pricey. 

0
099e6f0f089bb887d943e14cc93ae6b2

on February 15, 2013
at 12:17 PM

hello,i am on a diet,but love milk i have been on semi skimmed since starting my diet,and heathy eating,could i ask if lactose milk will be better again than semi skimmed.thank you carol.

0
82242b0668c52fb0a375b0f656c377fa

on September 27, 2011
at 01:26 PM

Might want to check out this talk on milk from AHS:

http://vimeo.com/27671369

0
7e36094a0f7a2fbad24290225405220b

(2064)

on September 27, 2011
at 07:52 AM

It depends why you are cutting the lactose. I think strict paleo for most people means dairy free but lactose free milk is good if you are limiting carbs for weight loss.

3432683fc74c2d2a40efe1e8f16ac1f6

(1130)

on September 27, 2011
at 01:14 PM

Why specifically it is good in that case? (I mean comparing with just not drinking milk at all). I am asking because I don't see the benefits and also don't have a knowledge about what is the effect after artificially remove the lactose component.

4145b36f1488224964edac6258b75aff

(7821)

on September 27, 2011
at 02:38 PM

Lactose free milk is not carb free milk. It's just milk that has had lactase put into it, breaking up the lactose into glucose and galactose.

F4a6fc9f0b701e12cdf2ad5dadaeb2dd

(360)

on February 15, 2013
at 03:53 PM

My body is disturbed by galactose just as much as lactose.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!