1

votes

Good or Bad - Cultured Milk (i.e Yogurt, Kefir)

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 06, 2013 at 11:27 PM

Most Paleohackers are familiar with the drawbacks of the store-bought cow milk. But if one were to culture it with kefir or good bacterias, what are then the final outcome for your health?

Please give a balanced opinion with both positives and negatives.

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 08, 2013
at 06:12 PM

From what I understand, there are two reasons to heat the milk when making yogurt: 1) it denatures the proteins so you can get a thick yogurt. Otherwise it stays pretty runny. I've found the longer you keep it at 180 degrees the thicker. 2) it kills the bacteria in the milk so that your culture has essentially a "clean slate" to inoculate with what you want. As I delve more and more into Paleo, I realize these two reasons aren't so desirable--at least if you have a source of raw milk. But as for commercial milk, perhaps it's better.

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 08, 2013
at 02:09 PM

I don't understand why you further have to denature proteins in yogurt. Don't the bacterias do that? And how do you further denature yogurt?

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 08, 2013
at 02:08 PM

I think the reason is that modern milk isn't real milk. a cow today produces 10 times (or something like that) more milk than a real cow. that obviously has it drawbacks. However I will try to implement my own cultured milk to my diet. that at least has a lot more bacterias, yeast than store-bought.

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3 Answers

3
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 07, 2013
at 06:03 AM

My own feeling is the probiotic cultures make up for less than ideal milk, as long as you tolerate pasteurized milk in the first place. Raw cultured milk would be better, but too pricey.

Personally I prefer kefir because you don't have to further denature the proteins as you do in typical yogurt (you can buy cultures that don't require that).

Dairy isn't strictly paleo to begin with, so it's an individual choice.

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 08, 2013
at 02:09 PM

I don't understand why you further have to denature proteins in yogurt. Don't the bacterias do that? And how do you further denature yogurt?

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on April 08, 2013
at 06:12 PM

From what I understand, there are two reasons to heat the milk when making yogurt: 1) it denatures the proteins so you can get a thick yogurt. Otherwise it stays pretty runny. I've found the longer you keep it at 180 degrees the thicker. 2) it kills the bacteria in the milk so that your culture has essentially a "clean slate" to inoculate with what you want. As I delve more and more into Paleo, I realize these two reasons aren't so desirable--at least if you have a source of raw milk. But as for commercial milk, perhaps it's better.

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 08, 2013
at 02:08 PM

I think the reason is that modern milk isn't real milk. a cow today produces 10 times (or something like that) more milk than a real cow. that obviously has it drawbacks. However I will try to implement my own cultured milk to my diet. that at least has a lot more bacterias, yeast than store-bought.

2
Adb6852b4f2f42904da67708ffcd59f5

on April 21, 2013
at 09:35 PM

I regularly make goat milk kefir with great success. (I use regular store bought pasteurized goat milk as I can't afford raw milk as I am only a student with limited money!!) :)

I drink it every day whilst my next batch is busy fermenting. And the results of drink a large cup every day?...

I have clearer skin as I have acne prone issues, my digestion is better and since I am try to gain muscle and eat a lot of calories >3500kcal, it has helped digest my food as I don't feel weighed down if you know what I mean.

Other than that I feel it has benefited in other ways that I hadn't expected like more energy,better bowels and being able to tolerate dairy!!!

Yes dairy is not paleo but tbh it doesn't really matter as long as you thrive on it and it helps then go for it!

2
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on April 21, 2013
at 01:05 PM

As far as impact on blood sugar levels, if someone is sensitive to lactose, kefir can make all the difference. I can drink as much kefir as I desire without a significant blood sugar spike, but 8-12 oz. of milk and I get a considerable bump.

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