0

votes

Cheese from goat's milk vs cow's milk

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 19, 2011 at 1:17 AM

I'm allergic to cow's milk and always have a delayed allergic reaction to it, so I'm wondering if I'd have the same reaction to cheese made from goat's milk. I've read that it's less allergenic but I'm not sure. Any inputs would be appreciated.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 09:16 PM

Do you mean raw goat's milk or cow's milk cheese?

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:31 PM

Can you get raw milk cheese?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 03:58 AM

Milk (pasteurized or raw) itself doesn't contain beneficial bacteria/microbes, they are added for any further processing (i.e. yogurt and *some* cheeses). Yogurt is usually better tolerated by those lactose-intolerant because the lactose has been consumed by the bacterial culture. Cheeses aren't fermented so their low lactose levels are due simply to the cheese making process.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 03:58 AM

You're right all my symptoms point to casein sensitivity, I'm just wondering if there would be some cross reaction of my immune system to the casein in goat cheese. Also, I'm wondering if the bacteria that ferment the milk alter the proteins so they're less allergenic.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 03:54 AM

I researched symptoms of lactose intolerance and delayed IgG mediated allergic reactions and I have all the symptoms of the latter. Also, I had a blood test done showing I was allergic to dairy and gluten. Shah, I've only had standard pasteurized A1 cow's milk, so I'm sure that's a factor too.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on December 19, 2011
at 03:43 AM

I was under the impression that unpasteurized dairy products would still contain lactobacillus bacteria that help break lactose down into lactic acid. I'm pretty sure any success I've had introducing dairy has been due to choosing raw forms, though I haven't had the opportunity to test raw cow products to verify. Raw goat cheese tends to be a bit easier to find, it seems.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:41 AM

Hi, Did you ever pursue the bodywork?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:18 AM

Said another way, Andy and I "give you" permission to do you own (n+1 experiment).........as long as you're not risking death, which you are now on record as denying. :):):) Would you agree ANDY?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Does a2 cow's milk do this to you or just a1 cow, raw,grass fed, Big Dary brand or small local. Tell us all the details. But even if you answer one way or the other, you still have to try it.Oherwise, any answer is akin to a Las Vegas handicap. That's why they play the game.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:13 AM

If you're ok with one milk and not another, you're not lactose intolerant. The fact that pasturization causes effects indicates you're sensitive to the proteins.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:12 AM

That's not an allergy per se. It really depends on what you're reacting to in the milk.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I'm allergic to the point where I feel very fatigued and have brain fog the next day after having anything with cow's milk in it. I'm asking this question cause I'd like to have a good idea of whether or not anything with goat's milk, specifically goat's cheese, will have a similar effect.

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3 Answers

2
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on December 19, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Try goat milk butter first. Mostly fat, with a little casein. Would love to hear how it goes if you decide to expertiment.

2
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 19, 2011
at 01:23 AM

It's tastier. That may not be helpful. Erm, how allergenic are you? Would it be life-threatening to try it and see? As you say, there are reasons why you might react differently, but this really is a case where the only definitive answer can come from your own body.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:12 AM

That's not an allergy per se. It really depends on what you're reacting to in the milk.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 03:54 AM

I researched symptoms of lactose intolerance and delayed IgG mediated allergic reactions and I have all the symptoms of the latter. Also, I had a blood test done showing I was allergic to dairy and gluten. Shah, I've only had standard pasteurized A1 cow's milk, so I'm sure that's a factor too.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:14 AM

Does a2 cow's milk do this to you or just a1 cow, raw,grass fed, Big Dary brand or small local. Tell us all the details. But even if you answer one way or the other, you still have to try it.Oherwise, any answer is akin to a Las Vegas handicap. That's why they play the game.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 01:46 AM

I'm allergic to the point where I feel very fatigued and have brain fog the next day after having anything with cow's milk in it. I'm asking this question cause I'd like to have a good idea of whether or not anything with goat's milk, specifically goat's cheese, will have a similar effect.

Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 19, 2011
at 12:31 PM

Can you get raw milk cheese?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:18 AM

Said another way, Andy and I "give you" permission to do you own (n+1 experiment).........as long as you're not risking death, which you are now on record as denying. :):):) Would you agree ANDY?

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 09:16 PM

Do you mean raw goat's milk or cow's milk cheese?

1
0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:09 AM

I am lactose intolerant and I find that I'm able to tolerate raw goat's cheese in moderate quantities with no problems. Pasteurized goats cheese can cause a little bit of stomach upset, but nothing like what I get from cow products.

That said, your symptoms sound more like a casein sensitivity, which is still contained in goat products. If you don't want to give up dairy, it may be worth finding a high quality, unpasteurized, goat cheese to try.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 03:58 AM

Milk (pasteurized or raw) itself doesn't contain beneficial bacteria/microbes, they are added for any further processing (i.e. yogurt and *some* cheeses). Yogurt is usually better tolerated by those lactose-intolerant because the lactose has been consumed by the bacterial culture. Cheeses aren't fermented so their low lactose levels are due simply to the cheese making process.

Medium avatar

on December 19, 2011
at 03:58 AM

You're right all my symptoms point to casein sensitivity, I'm just wondering if there would be some cross reaction of my immune system to the casein in goat cheese. Also, I'm wondering if the bacteria that ferment the milk alter the proteins so they're less allergenic.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 19, 2011
at 02:13 AM

If you're ok with one milk and not another, you're not lactose intolerant. The fact that pasturization causes effects indicates you're sensitive to the proteins.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on December 19, 2011
at 03:43 AM

I was under the impression that unpasteurized dairy products would still contain lactobacillus bacteria that help break lactose down into lactic acid. I'm pretty sure any success I've had introducing dairy has been due to choosing raw forms, though I haven't had the opportunity to test raw cow products to verify. Raw goat cheese tends to be a bit easier to find, it seems.

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