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Almond Substitute-how much is too much?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 03, 2012 at 4:08 AM

I love almond substitutes. Milk, Butter, Cheese, Flour=delicious. I'm just waiting for someone to develop an almond based yogurt!! But I know I am not suppose to have a lot of it because of the fat content. How much is too much? Can I have an 8oz glass every day or every week or every month? I am trying to loose weight but I love that stuff, tell me I can fit into my diet??

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:56 AM

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/custom/278488/2 - 3 grams fat in one packet of this commercial stuff for example.

Bb3d1772b28c02da2426e40dfcb533f5

(5381)

on August 03, 2012
at 07:55 AM

Almond milk has almost no nutrients of any kind in it, fat or otherwise. So the milk is pretty safe IMO. However the commercial stuff has guar gum and other weirdness, so you may wish to make your own.

F4d04667059bc682540fdfd8b40f13a7

on August 03, 2012
at 04:42 AM

Almond CHEESE?! Tell me more....!

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3 Answers

1
0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:36 AM

Take a look at the total amount of omega 6 PUFA you get per day. Aim for 10 grams or so.

Check the labels for polyunsaturated fat. Or put your food into cronometer to check omega 6 Pufa amount is not overdone

Take adequate omega 3 or oily fish 1 - 3 grams EPA + DHA day to make sure you get enough to balance omega 6

0
Ba99a15e6bf870b81286791617050593

(671)

on August 03, 2012
at 10:59 AM

Almond milk is not something to be wildly concerned about calorie-wise. Particularly if you buy unsweetened, one cup a day is not adding much: http://www.livestrong.com/thedailyplate/nutrition-calories/food/almond-breeze/almond-milk-vanilla-unsweetened/

Nor should you be concerned about the fat. It's the additional ingredients - for all of those products - that begin to make it sketchy, carrageenan, guar gum, etc. And then read all you want about phytic acid: http://www.westonaprice.org/food-features/living-with-phytic-acid

If you're trying to lose weight, calorie for satiety wise, almonds aren't the best choice. I could down an entire loaf of almond bread w/out much fuss. My experience with most things almond is I'm eating them outside of a regular meal - a shake after dinner, snack during the day, bread with almond butter and honey as a mini-dessert. All fine in moderation, but if it's a regular part of your diet, they're likely in supplement to your regular meals as well.

Here's Martin Berkhan on nuts and weight loss: "Nuts in all their various forms are the most overrated and overhyped foods in the “health conscious” community. Just because it’s a natural food doesn’t mean it’s all that diet friendly or even healthy for that matter.

Packing a higher calorie density than chocolate, it’s no big mystery that people easily overdo it with nuts. Some people rationalize a high nut consumption by saying it’s a healthy and natural snack, but this is wrong. Nuts contain an incomplete amino acid profile and consist mostly of plant fats. The westernized diet is already highly unbalanced in the omega 3: omega 6-ratio—the polyunsaturated fats from nuts certainly won’t help.

Optimize the fat composition of your diet by kicking nuts to the curb and add more fish, that’s my recommendation. You’ll be more satiated and healthier to boot."

A cup of milk every day? Doubt it will hurt you. Becoming dependent on all things almond substitute (just eat cheese!) will.

0
Cd77fd01d8be999aa91b8678e262f419

(825)

on August 03, 2012
at 04:43 AM

On top of Julianne's recommendation, be extra careful to read labels. A lot of almond milk is sweetened, and I've spotted all sorts of nasties in the other almond derivatives too. I tend to use coconut wherever possible personally, but I know it doesn't work for everyone.

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