2

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Like Bradbury's Story, "The Murderer," Do you wish to live in tech isolation?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 20, 2012 at 6:03 AM

Ray Bradbury's story, "The Murderer,"http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Murderer, "murders" all forms of technology, wrist radios (like iphones), constant music devices, tv, that constant babbling, and finds himself arrested. He wants to be put away in an asylum, for peace and quiet with his thoughts. I often felt this way, when I was younger. I just wanted to be left ALONE. I still feel this way, but appreciate the certain, "plugged out, and selectively tuned-in" medium of the internet. How do you feel about mass-communication? Why don't we have wrist-band communicators? Would you feel better in solitude, away from constant streaming media? WOULD YOU HAVE LEARNED ABOUT PALEO, WITHOUT THE INTERNET? I found it through online research on my gluten-intolerance.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on June 21, 2012
at 12:46 PM

Raney, I agree that technology can be used for a more shallow dialogue...but that is the choice of the individual. People can be shallow without technology as well. I don't find that how other people use technology affects me much, except for those who text while driving. That is extremely dangerous and foolish. I believe some studies have shown it impairs you as much as drinking and driving.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on June 21, 2012
at 12:36 PM

Thanks for the "advice," Jake. Actually, in my situation, I would be worse at my job with no technology around. The question was whether we desire to be without technology, not to make personal and inaccurate judgments about people you don't know.

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:16 PM

I think that it is entirely possible to use technology to "stay in touch" - in the sense that: you use it to make plans, you use it to have deep, meaningful, enthralling conversations - and you put it away when you're around physically present people. However it seems that most people use their technology (texting especially) to carry on a persistent, shallow dialogue, an escape from the fear of being lonely, of being present, of being "bored". Generally I would agree that technology is going to reduce the depth of connection - one needs to put some effort forth to keep it otherwise.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:05 PM

i guarantee you would find a way to do stay in touch with your friends and job if there was no technology around. and i'd be willing to bet you would have a closer relationship with your friends and be better at your job

Medium avatar

(2338)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:00 PM

yeah i hear ya. i can't lie i've done it and do it as well but i always try to be conscious of it and minimize it as much as possible. one day i hope to be more free of these things. they put you in a make believe world and creates such a disconnect with the amazing real world we have.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Drives me crazy when people walk around staring at their smartphones.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 20, 2012
at 01:39 PM

I am a librarian.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 20, 2012
at 06:33 AM

I appreciate your perspective. I grew up before internet and cell phones, and we seemed to do just fine with phone books, encyclopedias, and libraries :)

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 20, 2012
at 06:28 AM

Do you remember when you had a phone, no answering machine, and if someone called you, and you didn't feel like talking, you just didn't answer, or put it off the hook? Now, it's like, "I called you fifty times, and texted you, why didn't you answer?" As if someone doesn't have a life outside this person's calls/texts. I have a home-phone, which I don't answer, unless they leave a message. I have a prepaid cell-phone, which is ALWAYS OFF, and is used for emergencies when I need to call out. Everyone knows my cell is worthless to them.

  • 26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

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5 Answers

1
2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

on June 20, 2012
at 03:01 PM

Nope. Technology is how I stay in touch with my friends and my job, both of which I like. Also, just because the technology is available all the time doesn't mean one needs to be using it all the time. It's perfectly easy to take a break from the internet or music or the cell phone without being isolated in the wild or an asylum.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:05 PM

i guarantee you would find a way to do stay in touch with your friends and job if there was no technology around. and i'd be willing to bet you would have a closer relationship with your friends and be better at your job

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:16 PM

I think that it is entirely possible to use technology to "stay in touch" - in the sense that: you use it to make plans, you use it to have deep, meaningful, enthralling conversations - and you put it away when you're around physically present people. However it seems that most people use their technology (texting especially) to carry on a persistent, shallow dialogue, an escape from the fear of being lonely, of being present, of being "bored". Generally I would agree that technology is going to reduce the depth of connection - one needs to put some effort forth to keep it otherwise.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on June 21, 2012
at 12:46 PM

Raney, I agree that technology can be used for a more shallow dialogue...but that is the choice of the individual. People can be shallow without technology as well. I don't find that how other people use technology affects me much, except for those who text while driving. That is extremely dangerous and foolish. I believe some studies have shown it impairs you as much as drinking and driving.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on June 21, 2012
at 12:36 PM

Thanks for the "advice," Jake. Actually, in my situation, I would be worse at my job with no technology around. The question was whether we desire to be without technology, not to make personal and inaccurate judgments about people you don't know.

1
Medium avatar

(2338)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:48 PM

yeah i feel like most of the problems in the world today would be gone if there was no media/cell phones/internet/tv. everyone would be happy and healthy.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 20, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Drives me crazy when people walk around staring at their smartphones.

Medium avatar

(2338)

on June 20, 2012
at 03:00 PM

yeah i hear ya. i can't lie i've done it and do it as well but i always try to be conscious of it and minimize it as much as possible. one day i hope to be more free of these things. they put you in a make believe world and creates such a disconnect with the amazing real world we have.

1
474ae29b80569199c6589e879e6cd7d1

on June 20, 2012
at 12:47 PM

As a person who straddled the divide (I first experienced "the internet" while in college, but I was admittedly a few years behind), I can see both sides. I think that within reason technology can have a beneficial impact upon our lives. But, we also need to make a concerted effort not to allow it to rule our lives. Facebook is helpful for keeping up with friends but also leads to having alot of minor friends rather than a few good friends. Email is good for improving productivity at the office but bad because you feel compelled to be in contact 100% of the time. Cells phones have the same impact.

As with any possession the question is whether it serves you or you serve it. (I'm a person who questions this balance continually... maybe too often.)

1
5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on June 20, 2012
at 12:17 PM

I didn't grow up with tech, but when the internet appeared I latched on to that with all my might. Constant access to information at all times as desired? The ability to talk to people around the world and get multiple viewpoints? It was a bookworm/information junkies dream!

When I don't want it, I do something else, hangout in a park, up a trail under the trees, dig my nose into a book (although honestly, the joy of a fully loaded e-reader is fabulous).

If I don't want to talk to folks, I don't. If people want to try nagging me, they can try but they won't get very far.

I would never, ever consider going back to life before the internet and all the other possibilities that tech gives us.

Added: By the way, I'm on my way to a second career as a librarian. Libraries are incredibly wired places nowadays.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 20, 2012
at 01:39 PM

I am a librarian.

1
Medium avatar

(10663)

on June 20, 2012
at 06:27 AM

Nope, no "tech isolation" for me; this is the world I grew up in.

I appreciate and enjoy spending time in nature. But would I embark on a Walden-esque adventure? I don't think so. Because the sad truth is, I have a love-hate relationship with my phone and laptop and I've become dependent on them--as much as I hate to admit. I think it's awesome to be able to access a virtually infinite amount of information at the tips of your fingers.

I think mass-communication is good if and only if used for good. But so many corrupt organizations like to take advantage of it to manipulate and brainwash the masses.

26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on June 20, 2012
at 06:33 AM

I appreciate your perspective. I grew up before internet and cell phones, and we seemed to do just fine with phone books, encyclopedias, and libraries :)

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