5

votes

What is the best type of meat to eat?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created October 15, 2010 at 2:34 PM

I apologize for the basic nature of this question, but I have been reading paleo literature from different sources and I am still not sure what the consensus is (or if there is one).

Is grass fed beef the ultimate? Or should I be eating stuff that is a little more unconventional like buffalo, venison, rabbit, etc? Is chicken bad? Duck? Emu?

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 17, 2010
at 02:56 AM

I describe it as being like lean beef that has been marinated in red wine...

1cbb6b2a813475d6c0b17fd5e898dc50

(1248)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:42 PM

I'm a deer bowhunter in Ohio. I have to wonder the Omega 6 content in the grain (corn, wheat, beans) fed deer here. I agree though, venison is my favorite meat...next is bacon!

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 16, 2010
at 11:37 AM

Roo FTW ! Is the taste comparable to any of the more convential types of meat ?

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 16, 2010
at 05:52 AM

And eating whole fish is great for you beyond just the n3 ratio.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 16, 2010
at 05:50 AM

Amen to pjnoir. Boredom is subjective - I know people who have been eating nothing but ground beef for years... It's not my cup of tea, but you can't label a practice 'boring' just because you believe it to be so. I find commercial television boring, but many people would disagree...

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:12 AM

I'm all about the offal that ive had: adrenal glands, heart, liver, gizzards. But I've never gotten round to brains. Can't seem to source good quality ones. And truth be told, I'd be a bit nervous

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:10 AM

Good point. I myself try to do a tin of sardines per week just to make sure I'm getting good n3s

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 15, 2010
at 11:18 PM

A number of the sea fish like herring and sardines are also probably just as good when it comes to healthy omega 3 fat content. It doesn't have to be salmon. Salmon is just the most well known.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on October 15, 2010
at 03:35 PM

only cooks are boring, never the food. grass fed comes in more than cow.

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11 Answers

7
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on October 15, 2010
at 02:51 PM

My lean has always been to Ruminants and Crustaceans. Wild/Grassfed being optimal

Poultry leans to a higher Omega6, but ultimately better than most non meat.

What the meat is eating is more important than type of meat in my book. Unhealthy animals shouldn't be eaten.

You ARE what you eat, eat animals that are healthy first

I'm a fan of pork, but it's Alot harder to find forest fed pigs that aren't grainfed

4
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on October 15, 2010
at 02:47 PM

I'm not sure what the ultimate meat source is, but I try to eat a variety of meat. As good as grass-fed beef is, you would get bored with it pretty quickly. I try to eat animals whose diet was as close to their "natural" diet as possible.

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 16, 2010
at 05:50 AM

Amen to pjnoir. Boredom is subjective - I know people who have been eating nothing but ground beef for years... It's not my cup of tea, but you can't label a practice 'boring' just because you believe it to be so. I find commercial television boring, but many people would disagree...

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on October 15, 2010
at 03:35 PM

only cooks are boring, never the food. grass fed comes in more than cow.

3
Ce0b5fd94b1034e96cf710b6f138c29d

on October 15, 2010
at 06:19 PM

Wild game you've killed yourself is best (although do pay attention to your local safe consumption guidelines for fish; farmers and industry have dumped some alarming stuff in the water over the years), followed by actual pastured organic free-range etc. meat.

Don't rely on supermarket organic certification; it's an industry-driven farce; sourcing your meat locally and actually meeting your dinner while it's still walking around is the best way to ensure that what you're getting is high quality.

1cbb6b2a813475d6c0b17fd5e898dc50

(1248)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:42 PM

I'm a deer bowhunter in Ohio. I have to wonder the Omega 6 content in the grain (corn, wheat, beans) fed deer here. I agree though, venison is my favorite meat...next is bacon!

2
1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 16, 2010
at 06:01 AM

My approach is to favour animals that are locally available (and therefore hopefully sustainable) and have been raised on their natural diet. For me, in Australia, that's wild kangaroo and wild-caught salmon. Cows and sheep sometimes require the introduction of foreign grasses, which can impact the eco-system, especially if land needs to be cleared and replanted for farms. Hooves can also play havoc with the topsoil, whereas roo legs don't. Roo is pretty lean though, which is why salmon is crucial, otherwise you would need to source large amounts of plant calories (which explains why traditional Australian Aboriginals' diets range from very low in fat and high in tubers, to practically carnivorous diets).

Nose-to-tail eating is very important as well, favouring the organ meat and fatty sections of the naturally-raised, healthy animal.

I tend to go for grass-fed lamb or beef once a day, seafood once a day if I can get it, free-range chicken once or twice a week, and the same for free-range pork. Add in a daily serving of sausage, bacon, or eggs, and there's my usual system, with a side of saut??ed veggies (in bacon grease, butter or coconut oil).

Find the foods you enjoy best, and listen to your body for information regarding nutritional deficiency or macronutrient imbalances. I know if I have chicken too often, I feel queasy and get headaches. But everyone's different. That's why there is no 'ultimate' food - just a journey towards what's ultimate for you right now. Enjoy!

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on October 16, 2010
at 11:37 AM

Roo FTW ! Is the taste comparable to any of the more convential types of meat ?

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 17, 2010
at 02:56 AM

I describe it as being like lean beef that has been marinated in red wine...

1
02736efa3fda31740e8890eed0cb663d

(1813)

on October 16, 2010
at 04:58 AM

I think there's a lot to be said for diversity as well. It's hard to get a large variety of pastured animals or wild seafood, but, to whatever extent you can, there's probably a benefit to changing things up.

Ultimately there's a lot we still don't know about nutrition, and that suggests we should eat as large a variety of whole foods as possible, excluding those things we have good reason to believe are bad.

There's a tendency in the west nowadays to identify some "super food" and then consume LOTS of it. Michael Pollan's point, as I understand it, is that this is overly reductionist and assumes that we know more about nutrition than we actually do.

The ultimate guide here is yourself. Try different things and see what works best for you.

1
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on October 15, 2010
at 11:57 PM

Brains. All types.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:12 AM

I'm all about the offal that ive had: adrenal glands, heart, liver, gizzards. But I've never gotten round to brains. Can't seem to source good quality ones. And truth be told, I'd be a bit nervous

1
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on October 15, 2010
at 11:09 PM

Grass fed ruminants and wild seafood. And organ meats! personally not a fan, but I'm still trying

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21430)

on July 04, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Variety in Ruminant critters is my personal favorite. That means grassfed(or wild-fed) and deer/beef/bison/lamb/goat. Fatty cuts for the quality in fat, organs for the quality in vitamins/minerals. Lean cuts for making jerky :-).

I have a freezer full of grassfed beef, meat I've hunted (wild pig, rabbit, and deer), and pastured pork (although I love it - don't consider it optimal).

0
C9fccba4e9e23ab1ae13a8faa93fd882

on July 04, 2011
at 05:39 PM

Grass Fed Beef is best

Pork and chicken breast second

0
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 15, 2010
at 11:07 PM

My favorites are prolly chicken but i know the n6 load is a bit less than ideal.

From what i hear smart people say, grass-fed beef might be the ultimate. Apparently the amino acid composition is just unbeatable and the n3 content of the fat, etc are super good. Unfortunately for me i have yet to find all grassfed beef that tastes to me as good as the ribeyes etc that i used to eat. So i only eat it once or twice per week.

Wild caught salmon has gotta be up there for one of the healthiest, too, no?

So i guess im saying healthy cow and healthy salmon seem to be the best.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 16, 2010
at 01:10 AM

Good point. I myself try to do a tin of sardines per week just to make sure I'm getting good n3s

1f70da0b737e9c6e7679a248f4228a01

on October 16, 2010
at 05:52 AM

And eating whole fish is great for you beyond just the n3 ratio.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 15, 2010
at 11:18 PM

A number of the sea fish like herring and sardines are also probably just as good when it comes to healthy omega 3 fat content. It doesn't have to be salmon. Salmon is just the most well known.

0
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on October 15, 2010
at 03:29 PM

Healthy, happy animals that have a history of eating right, well, and diversely.

And by right, I mean in a way to maximize Omega3s and diversify other minerals and nutrients.

Animals that are allowed to graze or forage what ever they like best are what will taste best to you AND be optimal for your health.

NOW, Go Have A Cow! heh

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