1

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Tough cooked grass fed meat. What to do with it?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 03, 2013 at 1:55 AM

I am a terrible meat cook. My steaks always turn out tough. I cook it low, slow, rare, medium, well-done and it always turn out tough. I marinate it in salt, spice, oil, etc. it still turns out tough.

How can I salvage cooked tough grass fed beef?

68655ec9711d207d69a63ebf96b37573

on July 03, 2013
at 09:11 PM

Are your steaks dry ages? It could be the meat, not you

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 03, 2013
at 01:47 PM

Paleot, Food Lab just recently put out a post on steak myths, among which it covered letting steaks rest at room temp and only flipping a steak once (definitely let steaks thaw to refrigerator temps though). You might find it interesting :) http://www.seriouseats.com/2013/06/the-food-lab-7-old-wives-tales-about-cooking-steak.html

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on July 03, 2013
at 12:39 PM

Cooking time will depend on the equipment. On my grill, a one inch thick steak only takes two minutes per side to reach medium rare. My grill is a portable stainless steel propane grill from the big box home improvement store which I enhanced with cast iron Mangrates. A 20-30 minute preheat on high takes the Mangrates up over 700 degrees.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 03, 2013
at 04:00 AM

Random suggestions -- Buy better meat, like a marbled ribeye. Avoid throwing frozen meat on the stove. Let it get to fridge temp, then set it out for a while before you cook it. You can marinate it in Red Boat fish sauce for a few hours for extra bombness. Cook it on medium heat with some oil + garlic + chopped onions + butter ghee, watch the sides start to brown up (should take about 5 minutes, adjust heat accordingly.) Flip it over, give it another 5. You can cut in a little bit early and check to see medium-rare perfection, or, use a thermometer and check for 130-135F for pro-status.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on July 03, 2013
at 03:41 AM

Renee has got it right. High heat is so important for that good sear. If you dont, the steak is mealy and gross.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on July 03, 2013
at 03:39 AM

Are you talking about beef in general, or just about steaks? For tougher cuts of meat, the slow cooker is a miracle -- nothing stays tough after 8 hours of stewing. But that's not something you'd want to do with an even moderately expensive steak.

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5 Answers

3
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on July 03, 2013
at 02:15 AM

Not sure what to do with overcooked steak, but in terms of improving your steaks to begin with: My advice would depend on whether you are grilling or doing it stovetop and finishing it in the oven. But in either case, sear it on both at very high heat - on the grill I do 2--2-2-2 (flip every 2 minutes), angled to create a crosshatch pattern. Then let it sit, tented under foil, for around 10 minutes depending on steak thickness.

7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on July 03, 2013
at 12:39 PM

Cooking time will depend on the equipment. On my grill, a one inch thick steak only takes two minutes per side to reach medium rare. My grill is a portable stainless steel propane grill from the big box home improvement store which I enhanced with cast iron Mangrates. A 20-30 minute preheat on high takes the Mangrates up over 700 degrees.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on July 03, 2013
at 03:41 AM

Renee has got it right. High heat is so important for that good sear. If you dont, the steak is mealy and gross.

1
6864d23c49952605b2a97d6256af804d

(726)

on July 03, 2013
at 04:32 PM

After you've cooked it tough, you can probably salvage it by cutting it into thin slices and browning it in some oil, perhaps along with some sliced onions.

1
Medium avatar

on July 03, 2013
at 03:03 PM

put it in a crockpot with some broth for a few hours, i could be wrong but it seems like it would work!

1
C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

on July 03, 2013
at 01:54 PM

Note that there's a difference between the expensive steak cuts (Ribeye, T-bone, Strip, Tenderloin, Porterhouse, etc) and the mid-range steak cuts (flank steak, tri-tip, top round) in terms of tenderness. The mid-range steak cuts require different cooking methods (usually a high, short sear combined with a marinade) and really CANNOT be cooked beyond medium-rare if you want them to retain any tenderness (arguably, you shouldn't be cooking the expensive cuts beyond medium-rare either, but that's more a matter of opinion ;) ). You could also look into using a meat tenderizer like a jaccard.

0
Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

on July 03, 2013
at 05:31 PM

Apart from what's been mentionted, salt in the marinade might dry things out and adversely affect the end product...

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