2

votes

Smokin' good meat: recommendations

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 12, 2012 at 12:01 AM

So i'm interested in smoking some meat sometimes (like brisket, porket) and I'd be grateful if anyone who has any insight could share it. What would be great are general tips re use, charcoal/propene/electric etc what's good for what, longevity, quality, ease of use etc, cuts or processes you've had success with when smoking, and anything you think is interesting or relevant. I've read stuff on sites like this one - http://www.amazingribs.com/BBQ_buyers_guide/smokers/index.html but admit I am still ignorant and confused.

Any takers? :)

edit- Thanks for your responses, lots of great stuff. Unfortnuately the Weber Smokey Mountain stuff is almost double the price here in Austrlia and postage rates are not kind. I may just build a hackneyed smoker in time. Am a noob though so in the meantime and compromising and bought a cheap smoker box to put in the existing gas burner bbq I have access to and some hickory- looking forward to drawing on some of the suggestions in here in the coming warm weather... :) Thanks

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

OMG ...your telling me you layer bacon over the ribs! I'm so gonna try that.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I know walnut can be toxic to a lot of other plants. I just looked it up and its due to a substance called juglone. http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html Maybe this is why you shouldn't use it to smoke with also.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Slaw is the thing. I've gotten into ordering pulled pork or brisket sandwiches to get the meat, toss the bread, then mix it all together with a couple sides of slaw and douse it with hot sauce. At Dickies you even get a free pickle to go with it. It's a pretty cheap meal which is about as paleo as you can get in a chain restaurant.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:18 PM

I've been warned away from using walnut. Which seems odd because pecan and hickory are close relatives. I'd like to try some white oak, which I could get without too much trouble, as it would hold coals longer than the filbert and punky applewood I've been using. For the barrel I have to cut small stovewood chunks to fit the fire basket. I season them for several months.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:11 PM

I was told to use fatback on top of a brisket if the fat cap has been trimmed off. Which gave me the idea for larding everything with bacon. I eat the bacon, in small servings or as a garnish, because the smoke is so powerful. Nothing is wasted.

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on November 12, 2012
at 06:38 AM

Lol yes I have! And I'm definitely on the charcoal side.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 12, 2012
at 02:20 AM

NO!....Thats a bad Hank! Now you did see the one where Peggy and Bobby actually had some charcoal burgers right?

61f9349ad28e3c42d1cec58ba4825a7d

(10480)

on November 12, 2012
at 01:28 AM

Propane? "Taste the meat, not the heat!"

  • Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

    asked by

    (2934)
  • Views
    1.6K
  • Last Activity
    1281D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

3
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 12, 2012
at 12:59 AM

Ahhhh, it's one of my favorite hobbys (BBQ). I have an upright slow smoker, an offset smoker, and a webber kettle and I love them all. It's debatable how you should start. I'm not a purist in terms of the need for a "constant temp". In fact I find that much of the nuances from one smoking to the next come from a bit of variance. A good book to have would be "Peace Love and Barbecue" by Mike Mills....great interviews with a lot of "legends" and some good tips on recipes to boot.

All that said a good beginner meat is a pork butt or pork shoulder (shoulder is the whole leg). It's very forgiving unlike a brisket. Cook at 200-230 for approximately 1-2hrs/pound untill the internal temp is 190 (for pulled) less for sliced pork. When pulled I add some apple cider vinegar and home made rub (same as you used before smoking). Serve with some slaw and it is awesome!

Really much of BBQ comes down to experimentation....foil/no foil, different wood blends (you can use any fruit or nut wood), bickettes vs lump charcoal (bricks burn slower and with less variance so are better for beginners), temps and venting (the more expensive your rig the easier it is to manage temps), rubs and sauces (especially when you make your own)......really there is so much to play with that I couldn't even begin to do it justice here. The one book I recommended is one of my favorites though and a great place to start.

You can literally use a hole in the ground or a trash can http://cruftbox.com/cruft/docs/elecsmoker.html and still get GREAT BBQ.....so just play with it. I'd recommend a dual thermometer (one for cooking temp and one to the meat). This will allow you to monitor things a bit better regardless what your apparatus is. Start with the more forgiving cuts of pork to experiment and move on when your ready!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:18 PM

I've been warned away from using walnut. Which seems odd because pecan and hickory are close relatives. I'd like to try some white oak, which I could get without too much trouble, as it would hold coals longer than the filbert and punky applewood I've been using. For the barrel I have to cut small stovewood chunks to fit the fire basket. I season them for several months.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:25 PM

I know walnut can be toxic to a lot of other plants. I just looked it up and its due to a substance called juglone. http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/1000/1148.html Maybe this is why you shouldn't use it to smoke with also.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:24 PM

Slaw is the thing. I've gotten into ordering pulled pork or brisket sandwiches to get the meat, toss the bread, then mix it all together with a couple sides of slaw and douse it with hot sauce. At Dickies you even get a free pickle to go with it. It's a pretty cheap meal which is about as paleo as you can get in a chain restaurant.

2
Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 02:26 PM

I use a direct fire drum smoker (http://www.andysbarbecue.com/). I fire it with wood only, lately a hazelnut/apple mix. With the lid on it fires about 3-4 hours max, so is more suitable for grilling and roasting than long time smokes such as brisket. The advantage of the wood is intense smoke flavor in a short time. I'll layer bacon strips over almost everything to hold moisture in, and usually cover the racks with foil to reduce fat flareups. This method has worked well for salmon, pork loins, pork ribs, beef loin shells, flank steak and poultry quarters. Brisket required reloading wood twice and came out dry. Temperature is measured but manually controlled with plugs in the bottom, so usually starts out hot before it settles down.

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

OMG ...your telling me you layer bacon over the ribs! I'm so gonna try that.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on November 12, 2012
at 10:11 PM

I was told to use fatback on top of a brisket if the fat cap has been trimmed off. Which gave me the idea for larding everything with bacon. I eat the bacon, in small servings or as a garnish, because the smoke is so powerful. Nothing is wasted.

2
06ca9c524c28bc3fba95d4d90f8f43c6

on November 12, 2012
at 12:42 AM

I love BBQ and smoked meats. Since going paleo, I haven't been utilizing my smoker quite as much. I've not research the health implications of lump charcoal as starter, with moist wood for smoking. For taste, it was amazing. I would typically use hickory as the wood of choice. Pulled pork was always from a pork shoulder (Boston Butt) smoked for around 10 hours till the spade bone pulls right out of the meat. It's a very forgiving and easy to cook providing you keep the temperature between 200-250. This was typically the least expensive way to feed a LOT of people for parties, social events, etc.

Brisket takes about the same amount of time and comes out tasting delicious. It is VERY important that you slice it correctly or it will have the consistency of shoe leather.

Ribs are the fastest, most expensive option. Typically on the smoker for 4-6 hours and finished on the grill. They do take some prep work (removing silver skin) and I liked a marinade followed by a dry rub before going on the smoker.

Again, I LOVE BBQ and smoked meats, I haven't researched all the effects of the smoke and other things burning has on one's health. It does taste delicious and you are cooking over low heat so that is a plus. Any questions on prep, let me know. Pre-paleo smoking was a several times a week thing for me!

Matt
PhysiqueRescue.com

1
41f5a72332ecb08a00eb1bf3a15092b2

on November 12, 2012
at 09:33 PM

I've had an 18 1/2 inch Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker for about 3 years, it's a great way to get into smoking. I paid $250 for it 3 years ago. It's the cheapest charcoal smoker you can get that still has good temperature control. Cheaper charcoal smokers will work, but the temperature control is poor so you'll have to fiddle with the air vents a lot more.

For cooking instructions, see The Virtual Weber Bullet. The recipes aren't paleo, but they have great instructions that are easy to adapt.

Note that even though it isn't pricey, people win barbecue competitions using the Weber Smokey Mountain Cooker. If you've watched TLC's Barbecue Pitmasters, team Slap Yo' Daddy BBQ uses Weber Smokey Mountain Cookers.

1
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on November 12, 2012
at 06:31 AM

For smoking, curing etc. - This is perhaps one the best DIY resource on the internet.. Enjoy

http://frombellytobacon.com/

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!