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Printed 3-D "Meat"

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 18, 2012 at 6:28 PM

Wow, technology. There's a startup that will be using 3D printing technology and the stem cells of animals to create "meat." Theoretically, meat could be produced with a much more minimal strain on the environment, and, one would think, at lower prices over time. However, this is some serious Brave New World sh*t. What does everyone think?

http://www.cnbc.com/id/48705341/

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2012
at 04:07 AM

+1 for horrific conditions in feedlots and slaughterhouses - it's amazing that this is not a primary consideration

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 18, 2012
at 07:43 PM

While not grain-fed, it wouldn't be grass-fed either. That's the true source of omega-3 fats.

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4 Answers

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2
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on August 18, 2012
at 07:33 PM

My initial recation is. "Of course not -- disgusting"

But then I thought. Given that it's made in a lab, one would assume it would be grown without hormones/steriods/etc, without being grain-fed (so it would/could be higher O3) --

Theoretically you could grow "perfect" meat -- something that is better than we can current get due to all of the selective breeding that has occurred.

I still would say no thank you, but it's not as black-and-white as I first thought.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 18, 2012
at 07:43 PM

While not grain-fed, it wouldn't be grass-fed either. That's the true source of omega-3 fats.

1
A39237551dac75eb36335098b0f5fa61

(525)

on August 19, 2012
at 02:24 AM

I'm not sure how this would be any worse than the feedlot stuff most people eat today. Yes, initially it's repulsive idea, but once people get used to it I think it might do well. Especially if it's contrasted against the horrific conditions in feedlots and slaughterhouses.

This is also a good way to engineer the 'perfect meat'. Basically you could create just about any nutritional profile you want, such as perfect omega 3:6 balance. And it's much more environmentally friendly. Let's face it, there's no way we can afford higher meat consumption with current production methods. And it's also free from bacteria and diseases that are sometimes found in meat products.

Last I heard of this (having not read the article) is that the medium they have to grow the cells is still ridiculously expensive. So it's going to take some time before this gets into mainstream.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 19, 2012
at 04:07 AM

+1 for horrific conditions in feedlots and slaughterhouses - it's amazing that this is not a primary consideration

1
Cf4e7d927a48582cc22adbe59bfd0b2d

on August 19, 2012
at 01:13 AM

I'm afraid this would actually put people off even further from the idea of eating meats, especially if big companies caught onto the idea. They may not clearly label that it was lab created meat (i really doubt they'd label that, actually), and people may be so disgusted with the idea that their meat MAY be coming from a lab, that they'll just avoid it all together.

On the other hand, it may motivate some people to be more careful about WHERE their meat comes from.

Probably both, actually.

0
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 18, 2012
at 06:33 PM

I think this is more strain on the environment than animal that naturally exists. You have to consider electrical, materials and gas costs that goes into making this meat.

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