4

votes

Only Starch and Meat Diet

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 27, 2012 at 7:21 PM

I was browsing Kurt Harris' blog and was considering attempting an all meat (mostly grassfed beef, chicken, wild caught fish) and sweet potato diet after reading the following post.

"Primitive populations practicing horticulture or hunting and gathering do not eat a lot of big green salads with lots of variety, but they do eat healthy starchy plant organs with monotony on top of their foraged animal foods"

"I think consumption of quality animal products is the sine qua non of a healthy diet. Once you have that, then eating starchy plants is more important for nutrition than eating colorful leafy greens - the veggies that are high fiber and low starch."

I have underlying auto-immune issues and am looking to do a N=1 experiment. What do you guys think?

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on March 30, 2012
at 02:36 AM

Please don't make any more of your arrogant statements regarding what I know or don't know about horticulture.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:55 PM

@Eric, I should say I don't care whether they are/are not powerful sources of the attributed benefits--my gut is much happier when I eat them frequently and I find them delicious.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:53 PM

@Eric, my favorite leafy salad is 4-5 cups of the following mix: romaine, red leaf lettuce, celery with leaves, cucumber (and sometimes grape tomatoes.) In a recent article, several of those were named as natural pain relievers; in others, romaine/red leaf lettuce are said to contain minerals and trace elements.

A96720eb77be29f27f198654fecd8f3c

(824)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Kurt Harris posting on my PH thread. Mission accomplished :)

1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 28, 2012
at 04:59 AM

What are your favorite leafy greens...

87f26cf235a0e2420e28779113b0257b

on March 28, 2012
at 03:59 AM

another hold would be basing your whole diet on two sentences you read on someone's blog...: )

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 28, 2012
at 12:44 AM

http://ruraleconomics.fib.ugm.ac.id/wp-content/uploads/J.-Peter-Brosius-Foraging-in-Tropical-Rain-Forests-The-Case-of-the-Penan-of-Sarawak-East-Malaysia-Borneo.pdf is a good start, as are the ethnographies and extensive data collected on tuber use by those studying the Hadza and the Ache.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 28, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Please don't comment on horticulture if you don't know much about it. Almost all tropical foraging tribes get most of their calories from tubers. They store perfectly well- in the ground. If you want a primer on horticulture, suggest starting with James C. Scott's book on anarchist cultures in southeast asia, which describes how tubers are stored underground in detail. Some varieties of bitter cassavas can store for years that way. This was the sort of thing that led to the development of agriculture. I would also look at some real ethnographies. You'd be hard-pressed to find one w/o tubers.

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:23 PM

I agree. I too find the satiety amazing. I used to find when I ate a lot of vegetables, I'd feel full but not satisfied. So, I'd roam around looking for something more to eat, then end up feeling overfull and uncomfortable.

A96720eb77be29f27f198654fecd8f3c

(824)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:00 PM

Since switching to a paleo diet, I've eaten vegetables in large quantities for the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Mostly spinach, broccoli, kale, swiss chard, I've always forced myself to eat these however, telling myself that they are healthy.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on March 27, 2012
at 10:23 PM

I think there's a reason I'm never the one complaining about my poop! I eat a lot of leafy greens, and interestingly enough my favorites are considered natural pain relievers and are also high in a variety of minerals. I'd definitely agree our ancestors were most likely to eat greens in spring and early summer but I believe they routinely ate things like water cress (whenever found) along with game, fish and tubers. We became a dominant species by eating everything we could, not by limiting our choices.

Medium avatar

(10663)

on March 27, 2012
at 07:25 PM

Don't see why you wouldn't give it a shot. Everything is about experimentation. Do it and see how you feel. I eat meat/seafood with sweet potatoes about 3-4 times a week. I ain't complainin'.

  • A96720eb77be29f27f198654fecd8f3c

    asked by

    (824)
  • Views
    4.2K
  • Last Activity
    1428D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

7 Answers

7
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on March 27, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I mostly let animals eat my greens for me. Important to eat organ meats & bone broth/gelatin if you decide to do this.

4
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 27, 2012
at 07:43 PM

I think the only hole in basing your diet out of that quote is that a lot of those ethnographies classified plant consumption mainly as medicinal. Most foraging peoples rely on thousands of plants for medicinal purposes- teas, potions, tinctures, skin salves, etc. Including some various teas made with herbs and greens in your diet might work without irritating your system.

87f26cf235a0e2420e28779113b0257b

on March 28, 2012
at 03:59 AM

another hold would be basing your whole diet on two sentences you read on someone's blog...: )

A96720eb77be29f27f198654fecd8f3c

(824)

on March 28, 2012
at 07:32 PM

Kurt Harris posting on my PH thread. Mission accomplished :)

1
284213562569be43dfda0ad40914da6f

on March 27, 2012
at 10:24 PM

yes, that is how I eat now. As with other answers it happened largely by accident. I began eating mostly fish and both white and sweet potato for starch. Adding kefir after each meal seemed to make vegetables (for fiber) superfluous. The satiety is incredible. Even small tubers with fat and protein seem to fill me up without bloat for much longer than more keto-friendly assortments.

why did/do you eat vegetables? For a specific micro?

2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

(328)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:23 PM

I agree. I too find the satiety amazing. I used to find when I ate a lot of vegetables, I'd feel full but not satisfied. So, I'd roam around looking for something more to eat, then end up feeling overfull and uncomfortable.

A96720eb77be29f27f198654fecd8f3c

(824)

on March 27, 2012
at 11:00 PM

Since switching to a paleo diet, I've eaten vegetables in large quantities for the vitamins, minerals and antioxidants. Mostly spinach, broccoli, kale, swiss chard, I've always forced myself to eat these however, telling myself that they are healthy.

1
2f83028f9830b25f7c21109197176d9e

on March 27, 2012
at 09:36 PM

Not by intention, but my desire for vegetables has really waned this past winter, so my diet morphed into an animal product (not muscle meat only, because I eat lots of stock and organ meats...because they're cheap) and starch diet. The vegetables (greens and such) I include are mostly fermented and used as "seasonings" and small additions for flavor. I've had no problems eating this way, in fact, it's been pretty inexpensive compared to the large amount I spend in spring and summer. However, I'm sure when the spring produce comes in, I'll eat more leafy-type green things.

1
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on March 27, 2012
at 07:32 PM

I think people should experiment to see for themselves what works. For me, starches crash my blood sugar and ramp up my appetite, so my diet is almost devoid of starch.

0
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on March 28, 2012
at 05:02 AM

You would want to make sure you tolerate potatoes... I do not digest them really well which foiled a similar plan of mine.

-3
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on March 28, 2012
at 12:12 AM

It really depends on where people live, but this sounds like it is written by someone who may have hunted, but not done lots of gathering. In the real world, tubers are harder to come by. They take lots of time to grow, and are either hard to gather or either impossible or sub-optimal at many times of the year. There is this idea that people gathered up a bunch of potatoes and stored them in baskets in their caves or something like that, but the truth is, many roots don't store as well as modern potatoes. Depending on climate and rainfall, greens would have been available for a significant portion of the year. OTOH, naturally-grown greens are very strong-tasting, and not only are they rejected by most modern salad-bar people, very little are needed for taste and satisfaction.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 28, 2012
at 12:44 AM

http://ruraleconomics.fib.ugm.ac.id/wp-content/uploads/J.-Peter-Brosius-Foraging-in-Tropical-Rain-Forests-The-Case-of-the-Penan-of-Sarawak-East-Malaysia-Borneo.pdf is a good start, as are the ethnographies and extensive data collected on tuber use by those studying the Hadza and the Ache.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 28, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Please don't comment on horticulture if you don't know much about it. Almost all tropical foraging tribes get most of their calories from tubers. They store perfectly well- in the ground. If you want a primer on horticulture, suggest starting with James C. Scott's book on anarchist cultures in southeast asia, which describes how tubers are stored underground in detail. Some varieties of bitter cassavas can store for years that way. This was the sort of thing that led to the development of agriculture. I would also look at some real ethnographies. You'd be hard-pressed to find one w/o tubers.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on March 30, 2012
at 02:36 AM

Please don't make any more of your arrogant statements regarding what I know or don't know about horticulture.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!