1

votes

Nutritional Value of Rotational Grazing?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 28, 2012 at 3:50 AM

How much does rotational grazing, such as is practiced at Polyface, improve the nutrition of animal products?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:09 PM

I'd guess that difference in end nutrition for us between grass-fed beef and rotationally-grazed grass-fed beef, is not statistically significant.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:10 PM

Though as you say, that pasture is more nutritious. If more nutritious food makes us healthier, surely it would do the same for other animals. And is a healthier animal not likely to be more nutritious if eaten?

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4 Answers

3
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:39 AM

I'm confused. Rotational grazing is a way to nurture pastures. It's not about the health of the meat for you - it's about the rancher's feed budget and then the quality of the product. But I tend to think that anyone bothering to really manage their pasture land for the long term isn't the sort of rancher who is hocking corn fed, feed lot beef. CAFO beef isn't kept on grass, I assure you.

1
B8592e62f9804ddabae73c1103d6bcb9

(1956)

on February 28, 2012
at 01:44 PM

Weston A Price showed that the nutrition in grass is highest in spring and autumn when it's growing fastest. Under Polyface practises, the grass is always growing quickly and so I would expect the nutrition of the grass to be very high compared to grass in normal grazing feilds.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 28, 2012
at 01:20 PM

Rotational grazing is a method of maintaining pastures. For those who don't know, the idea is to limit grazing animals to a smaller area and cycle them through each one when they fresh pasture is exhausted. There are a number of advantages. It keeps the pasture in the most nutritious state. New growth is more palateable and nutritious than old growth. The advantage for the animal is in its health. Because animal parasites have a life cycle outside the animal, by carefully timing rotational grazing you can minimize the infestation with intestinal parasites. This is reduces the need for chemical deworming. With adequate pasture and/or rotational grazing, chemical deworming is largely unnecessary.

As for nutrition of the final product, it's no different than say grass-fed product, because it is grass-fed product.

Ccacf7567273244733bc991af4ac42ed

(5198)

on February 28, 2012
at 03:10 PM

Though as you say, that pasture is more nutritious. If more nutritious food makes us healthier, surely it would do the same for other animals. And is a healthier animal not likely to be more nutritious if eaten?

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 28, 2012
at 05:09 PM

I'd guess that difference in end nutrition for us between grass-fed beef and rotationally-grazed grass-fed beef, is not statistically significant.

0
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on February 28, 2012
at 06:56 AM

It is also about the health of the animals, as different uses discourage the continued flourishing of certain pathogens.

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