1

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Non-organic meat, more good than harm?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2011 at 2:45 PM

Hello everybody, Are there really any problem with hormones and antibiotics (chemicals in general) in non-organic meat? Is it health worthy to expend more with organic meat?

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on March 17, 2013
at 08:39 AM

@ The Quilt: evolution is a theory turned philosphy for you and many others, and that's OK. But do you slaughter your own meat? Have you ever tried that? I think it's important to do this at least once to feel you're taking a life instead of outsourcing it. Your perspective might change when you feel a living being dieing by your hands.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on February 18, 2011
at 03:31 AM

id rather spend my time worrying about how I feel and live than the animal. Read a Darwin book to understand why. Still dont buy that? Good......youre prey then.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on February 18, 2011
at 03:29 AM

its more primary. Its about the food chain and your mitochondria. If the animal you eat eats a diet that is inflammatory you are then inflammatory......it becomes a transitory phenomena to you. That in turn make your mitochrondria more "leaky" and you age faster and are more suseptible to disease. The cleaner your food chain the better for your mitochondria. Regular meat is fed corn soy and grains.....you eat it youre getting the same effects in smaller doses. In a relative sense is it better to eat that meat than say a bowel of oatmeal or french toast. Of course.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 01:02 AM

this essay is so simple. this topic of cheap meat is realy complex. dont trust on this essay. parasites, infections, stresshormones, cheap delivery, chemiclas in all stages of meat produciton. this link is a joke. Real meat production is multicontaminated not just one or two things. go for grass fed or eat lessmeat.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 12:46 AM

think how the animals feel when dieing

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 12:45 AM

keep meat low and be cautious on eating it. eat major plant based.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:35 PM

This is how I feel, too. To me, conventional meat is better than any other food except pastured meat.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 17, 2011
at 06:34 PM

I too have noticed more wiggle room in my budget, and I happily spend it quality food, and more lamb!

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on February 17, 2011
at 04:36 PM

Great answer, love the political slant.

1acc4ee9381d9a8d998b59915b3f997e

(2099)

on February 17, 2011
at 02:53 PM

I would certainly buy organic meat if I could afford it because its more than just a question of what is good for me *personally*...there is also the good of the environment and of the animals themselves to consider.

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5 Answers

best answer

5
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 17, 2011
at 05:00 PM

My opinion is that CAFO meat is better than no meat at all, ie better than becoming a vegetarian. We are surrounded by toxins all the time. Yes, there will be some in the meat as well. But the meat has nutrients we need.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 12:46 AM

think how the animals feel when dieing

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 12:45 AM

keep meat low and be cautious on eating it. eat major plant based.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on February 17, 2011
at 10:35 PM

This is how I feel, too. To me, conventional meat is better than any other food except pastured meat.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on February 18, 2011
at 03:31 AM

id rather spend my time worrying about how I feel and live than the animal. Read a Darwin book to understand why. Still dont buy that? Good......youre prey then.

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on March 17, 2013
at 08:39 AM

@ The Quilt: evolution is a theory turned philosphy for you and many others, and that's OK. But do you slaughter your own meat? Have you ever tried that? I think it's important to do this at least once to feel you're taking a life instead of outsourcing it. Your perspective might change when you feel a living being dieing by your hands.

2
F9a0b72f38860d7601afd5a45bb53394

(3618)

on February 17, 2011
at 04:09 PM

I agree with Helen in that organic isn't just about the health of the eater, it's a systems issue where you can also provide for healthier situations for agricultural workers. For example, strawberries are an incredibly toxic crop and a pesticide California just approved for them in the past several months has been strongly linked with cancer. There's some risk to the end consumer, who gets these pesticides in small amounts, but there's even more to the workers in the fields, who have to inhale this stuff all the time. And don't believe for one second that agribusiness always provides adequate safety equipment for its workers. Abuse runs rampant. At least with an organic operation, the workers might still be treated like crap (they're generally Mexican immigrants, after all, and Americans are too busy being mad at them for "stealing jobs" to care what happens to them), but at least they aren't being poisoned at the same time.

Now, if I had the money to be spending extra for my meat and had a choice between organic and grass-finished/pastured, I'd take the grass-finished or pastured. I don't care if it's organic or conventional, cows still shouldn't eat grain. Similarly, "organic" chickens might still be raised in a warehouse or, worse, in battery cages. Of course the gold standard would be organic pastured meat... but we're not all the way there yet, I don't think. Some GF ranchers are on board about this and some don't see the point.

Not every food animal is raised with hormones or antibiotics though. Sometimes a grocery store will choose to only source hormone-free dairy (if you use butter and cream). And in the case of poultry, they don't use hormones at all. Ditto for bison, which is sometimes available in mainstream grocery stores. If you really can't afford organic or pastured and you want to avoid hormones, load up on the bison when it's on sale. Chicken to a lesser extent, because it's a bit high in PUFAs, and even more so if it's not pastured. Ruminants at least keep something like a sane fatty acid profile no matter what they're fed, it just happens to be improved on a grain-free diet.

Another thing you could try if cost is an issue is find out if there is a buyers' club for grass-finished meat in your area. Sometimes they are called meat CSAs (community-supported agriculture). We've got one in my area that I hope to use eventually. I can pick up produce and a brand of grass-fed dairy there as well, so if we get around to it we won't have to go back to the grocery store, pretty much. But meat's less expensive per pound if you can buy in bulk. A Paleo with a chest freezer is a happy Paleo. They make apartment-sized ones for under $200, too.

F6c1df7d5699661bd1f0d6d0a6c17fc6

on February 17, 2011
at 04:36 PM

Great answer, love the political slant.

2
Aa3a90ba6f6a6d488f28cfcdc4e05627

on February 17, 2011
at 03:29 PM

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 18, 2011
at 01:02 AM

this essay is so simple. this topic of cheap meat is realy complex. dont trust on this essay. parasites, infections, stresshormones, cheap delivery, chemiclas in all stages of meat produciton. this link is a joke. Real meat production is multicontaminated not just one or two things. go for grass fed or eat lessmeat.

1
Medium avatar

on February 17, 2011
at 06:13 PM

I like to vote with my dollar and would rather have farms that aren't destroying the environment with their pesticides, herbicides and petrochemical fertilizer runoff. Since those GMO corn crops are then fed to the CAFO animals whose feedlots have their own series of destructive qualities, I'd rather just opt out of the whole system. The fact that I can't go fishing anywhere without encountering polluted water/fish is less than ideal. This is to say nothing of the quality of the meat itself. Seems like most of us have a natural inclination to not eat sick and dying animals, which is exactly what feedlot animals are right before slaughter.

I've found that the fact that I don't drink, don't buy anything processed and only really eat in a restaurant every week or or two has freed up plenty of money for buying only healthy meats.

50637dfd7dc7a7e811d82283f4f5fd10

(5838)

on February 17, 2011
at 06:34 PM

I too have noticed more wiggle room in my budget, and I happily spend it quality food, and more lamb!

0
E70b7bdfeb6f34277975aea6d486fffa

on February 17, 2011
at 03:41 PM

Anything an animal is fed or injected with can exist in its body tissues. The FDA requires all animals to be withdrawn from antibiotics for a specified period prior to processing. There is a chance residual antibiotic levels. The USDA allows cattle, sheep, and goats to be implanted with hormonal growth promotants (HGP’s).

The USDA Organic livestock and poultry production standards are as follows: • Meat animals must be raised under organic management from the last third of gestation, or no later than the second day of life for poultry. • Meat animals and poultry must be fed 100 percent USDA Organic grain and/or forage diets. The standards will allow certain vitamin and mineral supplements. • Meat animals and poultry may not be growth-implanted, fed growth promotants, fed diets containing urea, or given or fed antibiotics for any reason. • Meat animals and poultry may not be given paraciticides (i.e. de-wormer) for any period of production. Additionally, dams may not be given paraciticides during the last third of gestation or during lactation. • Meat animals and poultry may be vaccinated. • All animals must have access to the outdoors, including access to pasture for ruminants.

Here's a good source: http://www.princeton.edu/greening/organic4.htm

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