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meat leftovers from broths

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 17, 2011 at 2:59 PM

I was wondering what is the nutritional value of meat scraps from bones cooked altogether as a broth considering the long hours ( 15+ ) of boiling time? Does it affect tremendously the protein quality and all other important nutrients like vitamins, enzymes or minerals? What do you do with it normally, throw away or eat? I am especially curious if it's sensible to eat it as a post-workout protein source or is it much better to cook yourself some other meat in normal period of time?

F3583667d653163c121640a015ffa93a

(784)

on November 18, 2011
at 01:09 PM

Yes, I think the flavor is gone from the meat for the most part, since the fat is all cooked out. Best to take it out before you let the rest of the broth go it for a lot longer. Wood stoves are great for bone broth, by the way.

1c7f48b2a066fb8fc5927ec31aa3e391

(175)

on November 18, 2011
at 09:19 AM

I think this is the best option, to remove the meat scraps from cooking after around 2 hours and then reintroduce them to soup at the end. Probably will do it.

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6 Answers

best answer

3
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:56 PM

I throw the bones and any scraps of meat out. I find the meat has lost all flavour after a long slow cook, so I presume that most of the minerals etc have also moved from the bones, meat etc into the stock.

If, after straining the bones etc, I find there is undissolved cartilage, I put them back with some fresh water and lemon juice to try to extract more goodness.

And then - I throw any solids out.

best answer

2
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 17, 2011
at 04:21 PM

All of my bone broths are the base of stews and the meat/gelatin/gristle all contribute to an excellent brew. Since I eat nothing but slow-cooked meat for weeks at a time and absolutely thrive I believe it's great as long as you drink all the broth.

I suspect any problem would be if you ate only the meat which has contributed to the quality of the broth. The bones do the major part but any meat in the slow cooker has added good taste to the broth.

At best, the meat without the broth would require sauce or spice; in the stew, the broth takes care of that.

EDIT: BTW, if you're cooking the bones for 15 hours, I don't recommend any boiling. I bring the bones to a simmer on high, then shift to low for most of the cooking time.

And, the protein powder many folks use has neutral flavor and has been cooked/processed more than your slow-cooked meat so I assume the protein is still there and fine.

EDIT #2: Another option is to cook the heck out of marrow bones, which aren't as meaty as some others, then add meatier bones and/or cuts of meat with veggies and just cook until done. While I always cook until I have clean bones and eat everything, you can control how cooked most of the food gets pretty easily.

1c7f48b2a066fb8fc5927ec31aa3e391

(175)

on November 18, 2011
at 09:19 AM

I think this is the best option, to remove the meat scraps from cooking after around 2 hours and then reintroduce them to soup at the end. Probably will do it.

F3583667d653163c121640a015ffa93a

(784)

on November 18, 2011
at 01:09 PM

Yes, I think the flavor is gone from the meat for the most part, since the fat is all cooked out. Best to take it out before you let the rest of the broth go it for a lot longer. Wood stoves are great for bone broth, by the way.

1
Medium avatar

(19479)

on November 17, 2011
at 10:25 PM

Interesting that this question was asked today!

I recently cooked up a batch of soup made with beef neck bones and spinach.

meat-leftovers-from-broths

It came out great!

meat-leftovers-from-broths

However, I was left with quite a bit of meat and other bits and didn't want to throw away all that good connective tissue.

meat-leftovers-from-broths

I doctored it up with some organic cultured sour cream and hot sauce and went after it.

meat-leftovers-from-broths

The texture made me gag, but the flavor was good and beefy, so I persevered and finished it off.

I'm either stupider than a raccoon or PAF.

(Soup recipe here) (Soup "leftovers" post here)

1
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on November 17, 2011
at 09:14 PM

I throw mine out. I've tried giving it to my cats but they won't eat it. I've tried giving it to the stray cats in the hood but they won't eat. I've tried giving it to the raccoons who visit my backyard each night, the raccoons who pretty much eat everything, and they won't eat it. I figure that means it's no longer food so I chuck it.

1
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on November 17, 2011
at 05:01 PM

I give the meat scraps to my dogs. (I usually spend too much time feeling the overcooked meat for little bone bits first..)

0
2fdb7a6236b04bdfc3dacaf2bc236515

on November 17, 2011
at 10:56 PM

I don't know how the meat fares nutritionally after being cooked for hours on end, but I tend to keep it and eat it with my bone broth--sometimes with veggies, sometimes just broth and poached meat. Liquids don't tend to fill me up for any amount of time, even if it is as nutritionally awesome as a good gelatinous broth.

Note that I have yet to make a good beef broth, however. All of my experience is with chicken and turkey.

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