6

votes

Kosher..dividing milk and meat...science.. experiences?!

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created July 21, 2011 at 1:11 PM

The hang up for this question is a beefliverwurst i found in hamburg which contains 18procent cream. It is organic by the way.

I always have the feeling that this kosher rule has a deeper sense so i try to devide meat and diary from each other. and i feel good with it.

Are you doing the same and how do you feel with it? Is there any studies on kosher foods and their health benefits?

Im specially focusing on deviding meat and milk in preperation.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on September 20, 2011
at 12:36 AM

yes, exactly. If anyone is interested, I'll see if I can find that article!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 16, 2011
at 10:55 AM

i like the answer. it has a clear understanding for me. So milk is only posssiblee when the life circle is ggoinng on. meat is only possible in the deatth circle. and both ttogetther is a more animistic ccircle. everythingg is god everything is spirit. something more animistic and tribal belief maybe.

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on July 27, 2011
at 12:41 PM

Dividing meat and dairy is probably healthier if you are using porous clay pots for your food prep. I'd think that the grease would seal the pot but if you put milk in first it would be a breeding ground for bacteria.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:17 PM

Yeah seriously. We used to keep kosher and we ate some horrible processed crap. Traditional eastern European fare is probably pretty healthy but all the parve desserts made with shortening, the soy milk, the Overcooked lifeless vegetables, all the grain based crap... Not healthy. it's no wonder so many of us are celiacs!

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 21, 2011
at 06:46 PM

I agree with Ambimorph and Yoannah, but I will say that if you feel better keeping dairy separated from meat, then go for it. Science is a strong argument, but personal experience trumps every time, in my opinion. (On an individual level, I mean. Just because one person feels great as a raw vegan doesn't mean that everyone- or anyone- else should do it!)

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 21, 2011
at 06:43 PM

That's been my view of the situation ever since I started actually paying attention to what I read.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on July 21, 2011
at 04:20 PM

it reminds me of something wise someone once told me "the Bible is not a diet book"

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 21, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Especially a group that is found in small pockets all over the world that only in the last century had a country to call their own. Gotta keep your nationality some how!

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9 Answers

16
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on July 21, 2011
at 02:33 PM

I know that a very popular view of religious food prohibitions is that it had health-based motivations. My personal opinion about the origins of Kashrut is that they were developed as a social filter. Dining with other people is a very strong social force, and if you cannot intermingle with an outside group in this intimate way, it will go a long way toward preventing dispersion.

For the particular mandate about milk and meat, it comes from the single sentence usually translated ???You shall not seethe a kid in his mother's milk.??? I have heard it argued that this came as a direct response to a ritual practice that was found in a competing religious group at the time of writing. If this is true, then the purpose was very likely, again, to prevent Jews from associating with or participating in competing religious events.

Having your day-to-day life require segregation from other groups, especially when they are performing their own rituals, is a very strong preservation mechanism for the group.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on July 21, 2011
at 06:43 PM

That's been my view of the situation ever since I started actually paying attention to what I read.

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 21, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Especially a group that is found in small pockets all over the world that only in the last century had a country to call their own. Gotta keep your nationality some how!

4
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on July 21, 2011
at 04:13 PM

I follow the traditional kashrut in a very basic form (no pork or sea food, no direct mixing milk and meat) but i am doing it only for the sake of tradition and belonging to the tribe. The origins of this commandment is probably tribal and connected to separation from other groups and probably some magical association with the foods that got lost to us.

the Biblical law itself, in my opinion, is an ethical guidance, not dietary.

I am not familiar with any studies that would support the idea of kashrut being healthier (or at least the non dairy/meat mixing).

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on July 21, 2011
at 04:20 PM

it reminds me of something wise someone once told me "the Bible is not a diet book"

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on July 21, 2011
at 10:17 PM

Yeah seriously. We used to keep kosher and we ate some horrible processed crap. Traditional eastern European fare is probably pretty healthy but all the parve desserts made with shortening, the soy milk, the Overcooked lifeless vegetables, all the grain based crap... Not healthy. it's no wonder so many of us are celiacs!

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on July 27, 2011
at 12:41 PM

Dividing meat and dairy is probably healthier if you are using porous clay pots for your food prep. I'd think that the grease would seal the pot but if you put milk in first it would be a breeding ground for bacteria.

2
2eae6378699f84d350e9b6cc357d9dc3

on July 26, 2011
at 05:57 PM

My read has been that Kashruth was not only community-binding as others say, but also a lesson in awareness of your food and how you get it, a good lesson for a tribe settled into cities by the rabbinic era.

We were also told to send a mother bird from the nest before robbing the eggs, a passage three of the four rabbis I have studied under say was to spare the mother's feelings. The last said it was so you didn't get pecked. :)

I suspect there is a note of over-indulgence in having both main protein sources in one meal, which "Rabbi Four" hinted at during discussion. Four rabbis five opinions??

1
844a1df120f983bda44f6f1ee07d24c9

on June 28, 2012
at 12:24 PM

I believe that the seperation was intended to mean that a baby animal would not be cooked in it's own mother's milk. (What ever that is suppose to symbolize or mean) The absolute restriction against mixing dairy and meat at all times, however, probably evolved over time and became tradition but is not,, strictly speaking, from God law it's self. But I am only speculating.

1
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on September 15, 2011
at 01:11 PM

There was an article I read that connected kashrut to Albert Schweitzer's "Reverence for Life", which seems something that paleo people can get behind. In short, milk/dairy represents life. Meat represents death. In order for full life, death is a part of the mix, hence we eat meat, but we monitor how an animal was killed, and the conditions of its life. Also, we do not mix life and death in the same meal.

A bit philosophical I know, but I found it compelling. On those occasions when I still eat dairy, I avoid meat for the time being. Fish is parve though!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 16, 2011
at 10:55 AM

i like the answer. it has a clear understanding for me. So milk is only posssiblee when the life circle is ggoinng on. meat is only possible in the deatth circle. and both ttogetther is a more animistic ccircle. everythingg is god everything is spirit. something more animistic and tribal belief maybe.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on September 20, 2011
at 12:36 AM

yes, exactly. If anyone is interested, I'll see if I can find that article!

0
7278560e76901ded4081022b54c6e165

on August 16, 2012
at 04:52 AM

I've often wondered this as well if one should consume dairy with meat, I do it rarely, only when the meat sauce calls for milk such as mushroom sauce over shredded chicken.

0
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on August 16, 2012
at 01:21 AM

I wonder if this covered in the Mishnah (oral law) or Talmud in more depth. The problem with the Torah is that the words don't mean the same as they use to, which is one of the reasons why they kept oral law around.

0
77188106a9c27a22ad47d0ef7318de7a

(922)

on August 15, 2012
at 08:22 PM

Milk curds around blood in your stomach and curds around meat proteins rendering them undigestable. Kosher is definitely healthy and since becoming a strict kosher vegetarian with only occasional fish I have noticed improvements in health, digestion, muscle mass, everything I can think of. I also have a great source for raw milk though, and I occasionally make my own mayo with egg yolks. Raw protein is very good for you and is not denatured whatsoever.

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on June 28, 2012
at 02:11 PM

I think the rabbis were on to something. By separating milk from meat one gets better absorbtion of calcium and iron. See here and here. It's interesting that dietary laws seem to be arbitrary but actually have some good reasons behind them.

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