1

votes

keeping raw meat without a fridge/freezer

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 09, 2011 at 7:52 PM

Hi all, I am wondering if there is a way to keep meat raw/edible out of the fridge/freezer(or if one doens't have a fridge/freezer)? Any advice would be great.

Cebbca9a78d5612bf3468b273c2010d5

(452)

on September 13, 2011
at 09:25 PM

I think the reason a butter crocks works is not because it keeps it cool (the whole point I believe is to keep it room temperature so it is always spreadable), but to keep the air away from it so it doesn't spoil as quickly. The air is kept away due to the water it sits in upside down.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 10, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I don't know a darn thing about keeping livestock, but from what I have read, chickens and goats are among the easiest to keep. Of course you only get one liver per chicken and need 5-10 for a decent recipe, so that can't be your only source. There are a lot of great homesteading blogs where you can learn more. I think organ meat is generally best eaten immediately after the slaughter... "liver and lights" is a traditional stew made from freshly slaughtered hog for example, partly because those are the parts that spoil first.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 10:05 PM

Thanks for the info Valkyrie. I will be living in a shipping container on a patch of farmland in South Surrey BC(Canada). The temperature ranges between -5 and +24 celsius. How deep would I have to dig to avoid alternative ways of preserving meat? I like to minimize my time spent on cooking, etc.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:21 PM

I was planning on having a rabbitry and possibly goats as well as chickens(but solely for egg production until too aged). What animals would you recommend? If you check out my last posts you will see that I am attempting to privalege organ meat in the diet along with raw eggs and so would require a fair amount for my purposes.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:10 PM

The only things that I have heard of that would work for organ meats are dry cured liver sausage or liver jerky. Not being cheeky, but given your restrictions, the best way to keep organ meats fresh indefinitely while keeping their nutritional value would be to keep them alive until you need them, i.e. keep livestock.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Would you know how to pickle raw organ meat? I assume salt/vinegar would have to be used?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Thanks for the idea: sometimes the obvious escapes us. I will be living ina seacan on a vacant plot of land where the temperature ranges between -5 and +24 celcius seasonally.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:02 PM

Its called a butter crock UNCLE. Thanks for the meat locker/cool scullery idea Kit. I will investigate some diagrams on the net if I can find them.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:59 PM

Thanks for the general info UNCLE. I am wanting organ meat mainly and I know it is a more delicate meat(and potentially 'lethal' spoiled). I will be livig in a seacan(shipping container) in South Surrey BC where the temperature I've been told ranges from -5degrees(celcius)-24 degrees above celcius. I will definitely be having eggs for personal consumption on the apiary I intend to establish on my family's land but I would like organ meat. Is there a way to preserve it for, say, A.L.A.P(long-as-possible)?

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:18 PM

This reminds me of a gizmo we have for keeping butter, it is a ceramic bowl partially submerged in water, and the butter goes in the bowl. Evaporative cooling keeps the butter cooler than room temp but not really cold, which is cool enough to prevent it from spoiling but warm enough that it's soft and spreadable. Butter keeps well in here for weeks.

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8 Answers

2
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on May 09, 2011
at 08:16 PM

Well 100 years ago before refrigeration the primary ways were salting, pickling, smoking, curing and/or fermenting. Any of these are do-able by the motivated DIY'er, though the consequences for getting it wrong can be illnesses varying from minor to major.

Without any more details on what kind of meat you're talking about, or for how long it needs to be preserved, under what conditions, etc. it's hard to give any better of an answer.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:59 PM

Thanks for the general info UNCLE. I am wanting organ meat mainly and I know it is a more delicate meat(and potentially 'lethal' spoiled). I will be livig in a seacan(shipping container) in South Surrey BC where the temperature I've been told ranges from -5degrees(celcius)-24 degrees above celcius. I will definitely be having eggs for personal consumption on the apiary I intend to establish on my family's land but I would like organ meat. Is there a way to preserve it for, say, A.L.A.P(long-as-possible)?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:21 PM

I was planning on having a rabbitry and possibly goats as well as chickens(but solely for egg production until too aged). What animals would you recommend? If you check out my last posts you will see that I am attempting to privalege organ meat in the diet along with raw eggs and so would require a fair amount for my purposes.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:10 PM

The only things that I have heard of that would work for organ meats are dry cured liver sausage or liver jerky. Not being cheeky, but given your restrictions, the best way to keep organ meats fresh indefinitely while keeping their nutritional value would be to keep them alive until you need them, i.e. keep livestock.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 10, 2011
at 02:43 PM

I don't know a darn thing about keeping livestock, but from what I have read, chickens and goats are among the easiest to keep. Of course you only get one liver per chicken and need 5-10 for a decent recipe, so that can't be your only source. There are a lot of great homesteading blogs where you can learn more. I think organ meat is generally best eaten immediately after the slaughter... "liver and lights" is a traditional stew made from freshly slaughtered hog for example, partly because those are the parts that spoil first.

1
312537f2ecb216c830c3fd351efcfbbc

on July 21, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I'm currently reading "The Quick and Easy Art of Smoking Food" by Chris Dubbs & Dave Heberle. It's great and now I feel confident that I could smoke pretty much anything.

1
13c4e260dc502ed887df9077b5612ae3

on July 21, 2013
at 10:09 AM

You could boil it,dehydrate it,add preservatives like salt and sugar.

1
A4f9da7d094aa72508853588682b65f7

(268)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:15 PM

When we had no power after the quake (17 days) we found how hard it was to live in a modern world without modern conveniences, like fridges.

Traditionally people salt or otherwise preserve what they do not eat (ice houses also spring to mind, popular in Victorian times. Also cellars are useful.

When i was a child we had a cellar and a meat-safe. The meat-safe was a wooden box with mesh panels let into the sides to let the air circulate. It was quite large. The meat went on a ceramic plate and was wrapped around with a damp muslin cloth.

I would have given a lot for a cellar and a meat-safe after the quake.

We do have a cool scullery though. After the quake we put the meat on a ceramic plate (I have no idea why but my mum always insisted ceramic not plastic or Bakelite) and wrapped it in cotton sheeting. I poured water into the scullery sink, upended a basin in it and put the plate on top of the basin. I changed the water whenever we had any to spare. If we had had running water I would have changed it twice a day.

Hope this helps

Kit

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:02 PM

Its called a butter crock UNCLE. Thanks for the meat locker/cool scullery idea Kit. I will investigate some diagrams on the net if I can find them.

9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

(15833)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:18 PM

This reminds me of a gizmo we have for keeping butter, it is a ceramic bowl partially submerged in water, and the butter goes in the bowl. Evaporative cooling keeps the butter cooler than room temp but not really cold, which is cool enough to prevent it from spoiling but warm enough that it's soft and spreadable. Butter keeps well in here for weeks.

Cebbca9a78d5612bf3468b273c2010d5

(452)

on September 13, 2011
at 09:25 PM

I think the reason a butter crocks works is not because it keeps it cool (the whole point I believe is to keep it room temperature so it is always spreadable), but to keep the air away from it so it doesn't spoil as quickly. The air is kept away due to the water it sits in upside down.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on July 21, 2013
at 05:58 PM

Before refrigeration, people also died earlier due to large consumption of salt from meat. But the simplest way to preserve meat, back then, was a stew or a chili/ragout. You would cook it and eat it, close the lid carefully, then the next evening reheat the whole pot. Bacteria could not develop while the stew was being eaten.

I am guessing this method will work with kidneys, heart or tripe. Not sure it will work with liver. Frankly, I think cured meat are unhealthy.

0
D83e454e794d761ab524814c0ff8f838

on May 09, 2011
at 09:25 PM

What are the conditions you're living in? Root cellars can get quite chilly. Also, when I've lived in the middle of nowhere, we dug a hole in the ground about 15" deep. Threw a cooler down there and kept our food in it, put a hatch over the hole. There wasn't much that was appealing to bears or anyone other animals in there, but we put heavy blocks over the hatch. Depending on where you live - well that will control how cold your food is. I was somewhere pretty snowy, but even in the desert, if you go down 4 feet or so, it'll be about 52 degrees. Not cold enough to keep your meat safe for long, but better than nothing.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 10:05 PM

Thanks for the info Valkyrie. I will be living in a shipping container on a patch of farmland in South Surrey BC(Canada). The temperature ranges between -5 and +24 celsius. How deep would I have to dig to avoid alternative ways of preserving meat? I like to minimize my time spent on cooking, etc.

0
1fc9c11cf23b2f62ac78979de933ad83

(2435)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:59 PM

Dry it, can it, or pickle it.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:05 PM

Would you know how to pickle raw organ meat? I assume salt/vinegar would have to be used?

0
22212e9ba2a041e6da6c963d4d41615a

(5773)

on May 09, 2011
at 08:07 PM

Are you in a hotel? You could always use a cooler and keep refilling with ice. Otherwise, minifridges are really cheat these days.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on May 09, 2011
at 09:04 PM

Thanks for the idea: sometimes the obvious escapes us. I will be living ina seacan on a vacant plot of land where the temperature ranges between -5 and +24 celcius seasonally.

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