3

votes

Is Smoking Meat Paleo?

Answered on March 19, 2015
Created October 24, 2010 at 2:52 AM

Smoking meat that is. I know brisket, a rack of ribs or a whole turkey certainly fits the bill, but I can't imagine our paleo ancestors intentionally smoked meat. I would almost think that smoking meat is closer to cooking over an open fire than inside on an electric range. Thoughts?

0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on March 15, 2013
at 05:39 PM

You might find some of these answers helpful: http://paleohacks.com/questions/179658/smoking-salmon-substantially-reduces-nutrients-and-omega-3-content#axzz2NYsWVBbk

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 15, 2013
at 03:02 PM

You're not thinking optimally when you say that. You're thinking the way a paleo would.

5ef574d7893bc816ec52e04139e9bc09

(6097)

on January 01, 2012
at 09:26 PM

The new title just made me envision a man smoking a pipe with a small chunk of steak in the end

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22913)

on February 08, 2011
at 04:34 PM

edited title to clarify that were talking Meat and not Cancer sticks

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 08, 2011
at 06:53 AM

I agree best to go with 100% tobacco if one is going to smoke at all. The additives they add in cigs are very questionable.

2fd2b2346da1afd4cea4de40ed8480a0

(106)

on October 28, 2010
at 07:54 AM

i just mean the way we smoke it. im sure they slow cooked it under the same types of conditions, but not for the flavor of the wood :O

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 26, 2010
at 12:52 PM

Kitavans and Hadza both smoke - oh meat, sorry...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 26, 2010
at 12:51 PM

Mongololians used to put tough meat under the saddle and ride all day to tenderize it. Not planning to re-enact that, but, obviously, people did all kinds of things that we probably haven't even thought of. I'm guessing that meat got smoked one way or another over the last 800,000 years...

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 25, 2010
at 12:54 AM

I stand corrected. I just didn't think about it that way. I've been thinking about getting a smoker so now I don't have any excuses! :-)

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 24, 2010
at 10:09 AM

Hmmm...I guess I just assumed they wouldn't take the time to smoke meat. I figured that was a long time to make sure no other predators got to it.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on October 24, 2010
at 05:33 AM

I would vote for they did. Don't people put pigs underground and smoke them? I would think it is very much paleo.

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on October 24, 2010
at 05:13 AM

Yeah, a lot of cultures smoke meat to preserve it, why would you say our ancestors didn't smoke meat? Unless you have some kind of evidence that says otherwise, I would assume that they did...

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 24, 2010
at 04:04 AM

How do we know our ancestors didn't smoke meat?

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 24, 2010
at 03:59 AM

Thanks jared. That's kind of what I was thinking, but you never know.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 24, 2010
at 03:27 AM

I'm talking about cooking the meat in a smoker only using smoke. The heat source is never directly under the meat. It cooks for hours at about 225 degrees.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 24, 2010
at 03:17 AM

I don't think I understand the question. Smoke gets on meat and then it is smoked. How is that not paleo? Seems to me that smoking would have come in to practice about 5 seconds after cooking was invented.

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10 Answers

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1
2fd2b2346da1afd4cea4de40ed8480a0

(106)

on October 24, 2010
at 03:41 AM

well our ancestors didn't smoke meat, but if the meat is cooked and nothing bad is put directly on it, i don't see a problem.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 24, 2010
at 03:59 AM

Thanks jared. That's kind of what I was thinking, but you never know.

Af842c68e3d07fa0e35b4274f3acaeec

on October 24, 2010
at 05:13 AM

Yeah, a lot of cultures smoke meat to preserve it, why would you say our ancestors didn't smoke meat? Unless you have some kind of evidence that says otherwise, I would assume that they did...

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 26, 2010
at 12:51 PM

Mongololians used to put tough meat under the saddle and ride all day to tenderize it. Not planning to re-enact that, but, obviously, people did all kinds of things that we probably haven't even thought of. I'm guessing that meat got smoked one way or another over the last 800,000 years...

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 24, 2010
at 10:09 AM

Hmmm...I guess I just assumed they wouldn't take the time to smoke meat. I figured that was a long time to make sure no other predators got to it.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on October 24, 2010
at 04:04 AM

How do we know our ancestors didn't smoke meat?

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on October 24, 2010
at 05:33 AM

I would vote for they did. Don't people put pigs underground and smoke them? I would think it is very much paleo.

2fd2b2346da1afd4cea4de40ed8480a0

(106)

on October 28, 2010
at 07:54 AM

i just mean the way we smoke it. im sure they slow cooked it under the same types of conditions, but not for the flavor of the wood :O

5
88905cfc5bb098ad3830671a1af373a8

on October 24, 2010
at 08:06 AM

I would say stick with Natural American Spirit brand cigarettes and you'll be good to go. Oh, smoked meat. Nevermind.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 26, 2010
at 12:52 PM

Kitavans and Hadza both smoke - oh meat, sorry...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 08, 2011
at 06:53 AM

I agree best to go with 100% tobacco if one is going to smoke at all. The additives they add in cigs are very questionable.

2
B3c62d89cd47b7d7209b6a99243d0ded

on February 08, 2011
at 01:24 PM

over at http://www.aihd.ku.edu/foods/plains.html you can read this

Foods of Plains Tribes

Arikaras, Assiniboines, Blackfeet, Cheyennes, Comanches, Crees, Crows, Dakotas, Gros Ventres, Hidatsas, Ioways, Kiowas, Lakotas, Mandans, Missourias, Nakotas, Ojibwas, Omahas, Osages, Otoes, Pawnees, Poncas, Quapaws, Tonkawas, Wichitas consumed plants such as beans (some taken from mice nests), buffalo berries, Camas bulbs, chokecherries, currants, plums, turnips, and animals such as antelopes, beavers, buffalo, deer, ducks, elk, hackberries, muskrats, prairie dogs, rabbits, raccoons, porcupines, prairie chickens, skunks, wolf pups. Bison supplied a variety of dishes: boiled meat, tripe soup perhaps thickened with brains, roasted intestines, jerked/smoked meat, and raw kidneys, liver, tongue sprinkled with gall or bile were eaten immediately after a kill. One version of Plains pemmican consisted of thin strips of meat, marrow fat and chokecherries pounded together.

Richard Irving Dodge, a career officer who in the late 1870s wrote his decidedly one-sided ideas about Natives in The Plains of North America and Their Inhabitants, had some interesting observations about plains wildlife. A hunter with no apparent concern about environmental management, Dodge tells about the plethora of animals he killed in a two-week period in 1872: badgers, various birds (cranes, grouse, hawks, herons, meadowlarks, owls, robins, quail, turkeys), buffalo, deer, doves, ducks (teal, Mallard, shovel-bill, Widgeon, butter-ducks, Shell drakes) elk, owls, raccoons, rattlesnakes. He also encountered bears (blacks and grizzles), cougars, pumas and panthers.1

  1. Richard Irving Dodge, The Plains of North America and Their Inhabitants (ed. Wayne R. Kime, Newwark: University of Delaware Press, 1989)

Taken from Devon A. Mihesuah, Recovering Our Ancestors??? Gardens: Indigenous Recipes and Guide to Diet and Fitness (University of Nebraska Press, 2005)

http://mdc.mo.gov/discover-nature/how/historic-crafts-and-skills/food-frontier has some great drawings.

mmmm FISH http://www.virtualjamestown.org/images/white_debry_html/plate44.html

2
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 08, 2011
at 09:04 AM

I think it's been established that various pre-industrial/pre-agricultural tribes did smoke meat, but there's still reasonable grounds to think that it might not be optimally healthy, just like high-temperature cooking in general. I'm sure early attempts at cooking involved searing meat, but there's reason to suspect that this might not be ideal, given the production of heterocyclic amines and advanced glycation end-products. Obviously in those cases we might also wonder whether these are worrisome when producted exogenously and not in the context of a high carb diet, but simply the fact that ancient populations did engage in it doesn't demonstrate that these factors are not damaging over a lifetime. Similarly, smoking meats has been shown to produce high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (for example, here and here).

My own policy is to try to slow-cook, smoke free as much of the time as possible, but I do occasionally indulge.

2
29802b6ce29daf82ad4a1b0de31d050e

on February 08, 2011
at 06:36 AM

Smoking meat as a way of preserving it would have been a necessity at times the tribe would have less time to spend hunting or gathering, for example, when moving camps or as a precaution for long winters.

1
107d71d158df1e70894f530b5fa948d1

on March 15, 2013
at 11:21 AM

Stop being ridiculous and just eat it.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 15, 2013
at 03:02 PM

You're not thinking optimally when you say that. You're thinking the way a paleo would.

1
F169ab26dd4b4db622aa9c63b237b689

on January 01, 2012
at 02:26 PM

I have seen a few shows on tv (discovery channel, Natgeo,etc) which showed tribes currently living a primal/traditional lifestyle and they smoke meat. As someone already alluded to, this does not necesarily mean its healthy. However the rub (pun intended) on this is that smoking might create carcinogens. So, the next logical question might be: what is the incudence if cancers in primal populations who smoked meat regularly? My guess is those rates are pretty low. Of course, the other dietary factors e.g. fruits and veggies, may offset the cancer risk. But i think its safe to say that paleo does not mean we onlly eat smoked meat.......so i wouldguess a paleo diet including smoked meat in normal amounts would be ok

1
A68f24168bc0de414a038037e287b581

on October 24, 2010
at 11:55 PM

How difficult is it to hang a piece of meat in a cave/on a branch over a fire? Any place that uses fire for longer time (like when it's a survival necessity for hunter-gatherers) smoking just begs to be done. Same as cooking in hot ashes or on hot stones. Our ancestors were smart, they figure out very fast how to use heat in a variety of ways.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on October 25, 2010
at 12:54 AM

I stand corrected. I just didn't think about it that way. I've been thinking about getting a smoker so now I don't have any excuses! :-)

0
90a55e9236584f764db06e4dffcf2c57

on March 19, 2015
at 10:04 PM

I eat this kind of meat.

0
Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on October 01, 2011
at 09:20 PM

For me part of the appeal of paleo is feeling, well, cave-manly. And personally, nothing evokes that for me quite like smoking meat or fish with my dad for 36 hours in our man-cave. Good times.

And, as long as you keep things pretty close-to-how-nature-intended (i.e. we make our own sauces, and use them sparingly), then all the better. Paleo is good for you, and the lifestyle should be fun too!

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