2

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Is meat hard on the kidneys?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 29, 2012 at 3:06 PM

Had a conversation with a guy who is not Paleo but extremely well-read in the field of nutrition. He said meat was taxing on the kidneys over time. Is there any validity to this?

Cfdbf3485f0bac5895f86d74afd9fac0

(98)

on December 17, 2012
at 10:05 AM

not maybe think about. When your kidney function is impaired you have to cut back on protein

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 30, 2012
at 02:04 AM

Wouldn't any breakdown of amino acids result in urea/ammonia? I've never been one for memorizing biosynthetic cycles.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 30, 2012
at 12:32 AM

So do you think excess protein is less of an issue when metabolized via the urea cycle than when it's converted into glucose?

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4 Answers

4
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 29, 2012
at 06:54 PM

Dr. Google is your friend: http://robbwolf.com/2011/05/19/clearing-up-kidney-confusion-introduction/

Basically, if you have healthy kidneys, then nothing to worry about. If you have unhealthy kidneys, then maybe think about cutting back on the protein.

Cfdbf3485f0bac5895f86d74afd9fac0

(98)

on December 17, 2012
at 10:05 AM

not maybe think about. When your kidney function is impaired you have to cut back on protein

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 29, 2012
at 05:55 PM

Excess protein is the problem, particularly the conversion of excess protein to glucose. A lot of nitrogenous wasted produced that ultimately falls upon the kidneys to clean up. It's the kidneys' job though, and unless you have kidney disease, it shouldn't be an issue.

There's no reason consume excess protein though, eat more fat and starch, they're cheaper.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on August 30, 2012
at 02:04 AM

Wouldn't any breakdown of amino acids result in urea/ammonia? I've never been one for memorizing biosynthetic cycles.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 30, 2012
at 12:32 AM

So do you think excess protein is less of an issue when metabolized via the urea cycle than when it's converted into glucose?

3
26e2364f7966432bbf8acfe930583674

(460)

on August 29, 2012
at 03:37 PM

All of the studies that have demonstrated that a higher protein intake has negative effects on the kidneys have samples of people who already had compromised kidney function. This sample's outcomes, especially where it concerns kidney function/health/etc. should not be generalized to the general population, only to populations with compromised kidney function.

0
10405c6f4c2e5bb251d25a37a0dc35a4

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

Well our ancestors were eating meat for a long time from birth until death. And from us being here now I guess that turned out just fine.

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