1

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How Do You Cook Your Beef? Grill / Pan-fry It?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 08, 2011 at 10:58 PM

I'm curious how people normally cook beef around here? Specifically, mini steaks like ribeye or sirloin cuts. Currently, I use two methods: (1) use a levered grill like the George Foreman Knock Out the Fat(TM) grill, which slides away all the blood, water, and grease from the beef; or (2) pan-fry it, throwing away the grease after the frying is done. I also have a mini oven which I could use, but it will take more time.

I'm a bit worried about the Teflon-coated GF grill, as I notice the surface constantly being worn. Also, even though I threw away my aluminium frying pans, I still have my Teflon-coated pans which are not ideal for frying, I know. I have to use a lot of bacon grease or coconut oil when using my stainless-steel pan.

After vising some Asian countries where various different methods of cooking abound, I wanna look into alternatives. For example, in Korea I witnessed beef being cooked in a built-in table grill with stove fire being directed straight to the beef stir fry from the bottom. Fish was being cooked this way, too. I would imagine you would have to buy this type of equipment. Can you?

Obviously, I'm not interested in sous vide. And I know about using the cast iron pan. But I'm curious whether easier, alternative cooking methods exist for healthier, Paleo-compliant beef consumption.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 11, 2011
at 08:47 AM

I don't know which GF ur using, but GF grills do become very hot very quickly. I'm always surprised how much heat it packs. I've burnt several steaks not paying attention to it.

D117467bf8e8472464ece2b81509606c

(2873)

on December 10, 2011
at 06:49 AM

TC: Knee cap armor?

B073bd1459fe384e2d0c3cffb746fa1e

(10)

on December 09, 2011
at 09:43 PM

Cast iron pans are the best. Heat them on high. Add a touch of olive oil. Have your grass fed steak (ideally) at room temperature with a touch of salt and pepper; toss the steak onto oil which should sizzle. Turn down your heat just a tad and cook 3-4 min/side (max). YOu can also finish in a very hot oven, if you sear on both sides.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on December 09, 2011
at 08:29 PM

Phazo: I used to experience social interaction, then I took an arrow in the knee.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Sigh. You guys. They have *indoor specific* grills - some are electric and stove top grilling methods just for this purpose. Also, a NY summer underground on a platform waiting for the train smells pretty much worse than anything else so my clothes smelling like delicious food doesn't bother me. I just open the windows if there is a need.

082bf04a7486991c5e573a66f1404b3e

(813)

on December 09, 2011
at 09:44 AM

What KAM said: I only ever fry or roast so I any fat that runs off I can re-baste with or mop up :)

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 09, 2011
at 06:26 AM

Yes! Carbon MONoxide is the deadly one! Thanks for the correction.

828429fe885f42968c0519d5b84cec40

(608)

on December 09, 2011
at 04:23 AM

Agreed. DO not make kalbi or samgyeopsal at home! Aside from the deadly carbon monoxide, your entire house, including furniture and clothes will smell terrible!

F77c6462cf6596fe6dabeeb5931821ab

(365)

on December 09, 2011
at 02:13 AM

Why are you tossing the fat?

D117467bf8e8472464ece2b81509606c

(2873)

on December 09, 2011
at 02:13 AM

I'm finishing Fallout: New Vegas and moving into Skyrim real soon. Can't wait to get lost in the mountains.

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:14 AM

I love the Korean tabletop BBQ at restaurants - I can't think of anything more paleo in a conventional restaurant setting. As far as doing it inside, though, all the Korean places I've been to have giant restaurant-style exhaust hoods above the tables, and I think you'd need a hood to do it safely in the house, too, if you're using a portable grill. Charcoal and gas grilling make carbon dioxide, which can be deadly if trapped indoors.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on December 09, 2011
at 12:25 AM

I've started baking every kind of flesh in a pyrex dish at 350 in the oven. I can multitask and play Skyrim while it's cooking.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 12:10 AM

Yar, peppercorn. A good spice mix on steak is salt, garlic, onion, oregano, and cumin if you want to play with some different seasonings..

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Yar - peppercorn, sorry. I have a Peugeot grinder that I love.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 08, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Salt and pepper, you mean peppercorn, not bell peppers? Rosemary and ginger are my condiments, as I try to be nightshade-free.

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13 Answers

3
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 08, 2011
at 11:43 PM

The only pans I own are cast iron or stainless pans and for steaks I pan sear or broil to rare or medium rare.

Out of ALL cooking methods there is the most important tip of all, IMO, and that is letting your meat rest after you pull it off the fire. Why? Well.. it will help the meat retain its juices. You want this. Nerd time! During cooking, the bundles of muscle cells in the meat contract, forcing out all the delicious liquid from the spaces between them. As the meat cools, those cell bundles relax, reabsorbing the liquid. Also, resting will even out the temperature and the doneness. Depending on the thickness, about 5-10 minutes is usually perfect - keep warm by tenting foil over.

I like my steaks simple, seasoned with good flaky Kosher salt and pepper. Sometimes I'll make a red wine reduction with butter, a little sauteed garlic, and herbs.

What you saw while traveling is Korean tabletop BBQ - yum bulgogi and kalbi. Yes, you do need to buy special equipment if you want to do it in the house. Do you have a Korea or China Town where you live? That's where you can pick a burner/grill, also you might be able to find a stove top grill plate. Or search Google or Amazon for mail order.

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:14 AM

I love the Korean tabletop BBQ at restaurants - I can't think of anything more paleo in a conventional restaurant setting. As far as doing it inside, though, all the Korean places I've been to have giant restaurant-style exhaust hoods above the tables, and I think you'd need a hood to do it safely in the house, too, if you're using a portable grill. Charcoal and gas grilling make carbon dioxide, which can be deadly if trapped indoors.

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 09, 2011
at 06:26 AM

Yes! Carbon MONoxide is the deadly one! Thanks for the correction.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 08, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Salt and pepper, you mean peppercorn, not bell peppers? Rosemary and ginger are my condiments, as I try to be nightshade-free.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 12:10 AM

Yar, peppercorn. A good spice mix on steak is salt, garlic, onion, oregano, and cumin if you want to play with some different seasonings..

828429fe885f42968c0519d5b84cec40

(608)

on December 09, 2011
at 04:23 AM

Agreed. DO not make kalbi or samgyeopsal at home! Aside from the deadly carbon monoxide, your entire house, including furniture and clothes will smell terrible!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Yar - peppercorn, sorry. I have a Peugeot grinder that I love.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on December 09, 2011
at 03:06 PM

Sigh. You guys. They have *indoor specific* grills - some are electric and stove top grilling methods just for this purpose. Also, a NY summer underground on a platform waiting for the train smells pretty much worse than anything else so my clothes smelling like delicious food doesn't bother me. I just open the windows if there is a need.

2
2c2349bc7af0fedb59a5fe99dac9fae2

(2707)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:54 AM

I've been broiling in my toaster oven. Great when cooking for one, less energy, a bit quicker, and still comes out great. I season with kosher salt, some pepper, some garlic powder, and a bit of ghee on both sides. Comes out great and quick.

2
Dfada6fe4982ab3b7557172f20632da8

(5332)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Cook? Well I usually let it get back up to body temperature I guess.

1
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on December 10, 2011
at 11:02 AM

I saute steak in coconut oil in a pan that has a ceramic nonstick coating. If I cook it at a low enough temperature that the fat doesn't smoke, I'll deglaze the pan and pour the reduction over the steak. Otherwise, I toss the heated fat and slather the steak with Kerrygold butter.

1
Dc5144de5078c44a2b106ff25778fd3d

on December 09, 2011
at 09:15 PM

My idea of a perfect afternoon:

Bring a flank steak to room temperature. Apply a rub (salt, pepper, cumin, minced garlic and onion, chili powder) and let sit while you fill your chimney starter with hardwood charcoal. When coals get white hot, pour them into a Weber kettle grill. Close the cover and get the grill super hot--around 600 degrees--and scrape the grate. Apply some olive oil to the grate, then grill the steak for 4-6 minutes. Let sit. Pour a glass of wine.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 09, 2011
at 04:19 AM

We usually BBQ steaks but also use a cast iron frying pan sometimes. Cook it to the rare side of medium-rare and let it sit for a few minutes.

1
56e59609362978a9dcb390fdeb45427f

on December 09, 2011
at 04:01 AM

After letting the meat sit out for about 20 minutes to allow it to get to room temperature, I will pan fry for about 2 minutes on each side, then pop it in the oven at 350 for about 10 minutes. Comes out perfect every time.

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 09, 2011
at 03:35 AM

I use stainless steel. I used to use fairly high heat but now I use moderate (level 4 out of 9 on an induction burner) and I usually reheat bone broth stew with the cooked beef still in the pan.

My favorite trick is to excise any seams of fat running through the beef portion and put them in the pan first so they are thoroughly rendered and crisp. I remove them before adding the bone broth stew. Other times, I cook 2 pieces of bacon, remove them and cook the beef in the bacon fat and then add the stew.

1
724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:17 AM

I have used a GF grill in the past, but my real problem with it is that it never gets hot enough to cook a good-tasking steak. The teflon probably isn't great, either. I did like the quickness and convenience of it, though!

There are fancier, more expensive versions of electric grills that don't have teflon, and that might work better, but I don't think it would be worth the investment to me.

I'm in the cast-iron pan camp for indoor steak cooking.

3c6b4eed18dc57f746755b698426e7c8

(5152)

on December 11, 2011
at 08:47 AM

I don't know which GF ur using, but GF grills do become very hot very quickly. I'm always surprised how much heat it packs. I've burnt several steaks not paying attention to it.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:14 AM

I use my pressure cooker the most but I'm not buying steaks, just lean roasts or stew meat. I heat tallow that I made from clean backyard beef and gently brown the cubes, add some flavoring veggies, salt and seasonings and the required 1 cup of water and about 20 minutes later food is ready. The cooker really keeps the flavor in the meat and makes a great sauce/stock.

1
164ed7cd8d84c926bc66f366619bf853

(495)

on December 08, 2011
at 11:07 PM

Well i use my stainless steel like no other... it's a matter of learning less is more. B/c it's so conductive, cooking at a lower heat setting (than used to w/teflon, for example) takes some getting used to... As far as cooking steaks... I go for the broiler.
If i want to pan-fry, it's in a stainless steel pan w/whatever grease I want to give it flavor (or not).
That's me though...

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 09, 2011
at 08:55 PM

My beef supply was running low, so last weekend I smoked a whole loin shell in a barrel smoker. I ran it to about 110F center (rare) then sliced it for steaks and froze it. The first piece I pan fried to rewarm. Flavor was a lot like prime rib, with a not overpowering apple smoke. This experiment will be repeated, since the shell (or whole new york) was half the price of a brisket.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 09, 2011
at 01:11 PM

No grill so my options are limited! I pan-fry all beef, except things like meatloaf.

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