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Grinding your own meat?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 04, 2011 at 1:59 PM

I've been toying with the idea of getting a meat grinder and grinding my own. I'm not totally sure I need to because we get all of our beef from a local grass fed beef farm, but they do outsource the processing.

Are there any benefits heath or otherwise to grinding your own meat since it's from a good source?

Does anybody have recommendations for a decent quality meat grinder that won't break the bank? Links appreciated

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 05, 2011
at 11:00 PM

BTW, if it's not obvious my improvement in rendering ground fat is compared to cubing it with a knife. From the butcher the fat comes as a sheet a 1/2 thick or so. I think it is peeled from the ribs.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 05, 2011
at 05:47 PM

I went to an old school hardware store and got one of the metal crank grinders for $20 this morning! Time to see how it works.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 05, 2011
at 06:22 AM

Your cat is craving the kibbles for the addicting opiod effect of gluten. You gotta ween him off it, trust me! Your cat will live much longer and happier on a all-meat diet. Cat's are carnivores! = ) Here's a website for credible information: http://dogtorj.com/

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on February 04, 2011
at 06:55 PM

This is what I have and I like it a lot. It's sturdy and easy to clean, and there are two plates so I can do course or finer grinds. I've also made good sausage with the adapter.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on February 04, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Grocery ground meat is like a box a chocolates...you never know what you're gonna get.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 04, 2011
at 02:00 PM

I guess being able to grind different kinds of meat would be benefit I didn't immediately think of.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 04, 2011
at 01:59 PM

I guess being able to grind different kinds of meat would be benefit...

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8 Answers

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0
A089b683ee0498f2b21b7edfa300e405

on February 04, 2011
at 04:32 PM

I use a inexpensive meat grinder I got from Lowe's. I find it helpful to be able to grind my own meat with the amount of animal fat that I prefer, depending on what I am cooking. Also it is easy to grind in spices like fresh garlic, chillies, ginger etc.

best answer

0
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on February 05, 2011
at 06:00 AM

Many years ago, one of those tv investigation shows got some of their employees secretly working in grocery store meat sections. What the employees saw was that most grocery stores grind in old browning meat in with the fresh red meat. Which is illegal, but they do it anyway. Gross. Every time I look at grocery store ground meat, I think of that show. At home, I sometimes grind meat and organ meat for my cat in the blender. I have recently switched him to a more paleo cat diet but he still yearns for kibbles. I find that if I grind his meat, he likes it a lot more. I find that in my crappy little blender with the short blades at the bottom, I can only grind a little bit of meat at a time. Luckily, cats don't eat much.

I've been toying with the idea of getting one of those old school hand crank meat grinders like they had 80 years ago. They made those things to last forever and since every household had many of them, they can still actually be bought for only around $20, even though most are quite the antiques.

209d2fc1f43df88348031c7c38077172

(693)

on February 05, 2011
at 05:47 PM

I went to an old school hardware store and got one of the metal crank grinders for $20 this morning! Time to see how it works.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 05, 2011
at 06:22 AM

Your cat is craving the kibbles for the addicting opiod effect of gluten. You gotta ween him off it, trust me! Your cat will live much longer and happier on a all-meat diet. Cat's are carnivores! = ) Here's a website for credible information: http://dogtorj.com/

1
5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

on February 05, 2011
at 07:21 AM

We got the Kitchen-Aide meat grinder attachment before Christmas when they were on sale for super-cheap. I'm very glad to have it.

I grind lamb fat from the butcher which I render in a fraction of the time, with far better yield, and better quality -- the more uniform grind means a more uniform temperature.

I also grind liver and mix it 1:3 with regular, 10% ground beef for hamburgers and meatloaf. The kids don't even realize they are eating liver. A whole problem set -- convincing kids to eat liver -- is null in our household. :-)

Ironically, I haven't made my own ground beef or sausage. We have a good butcher shop at our local grocery store so aside from a certain DIY novelty, I can't see any reason for doing it myself. Fortunately I have plenty of other opportunities for novelty in my spare time.

Finally, I have used food processors and I assure you the two do not compare, especially with fat. The food processor does not grind fat, it smears it into a miserable mess. Working in the kitchen is like working anywhere else, it's easy when you have the right tool for the job.

5740abb0fa033403978dd988b0609dfd

(2633)

on February 05, 2011
at 11:00 PM

BTW, if it's not obvious my improvement in rendering ground fat is compared to cubing it with a knife. From the butcher the fat comes as a sheet a 1/2 thick or so. I think it is peeled from the ribs.

0
58cc17a77bca6e503dcf6bf6471b76a1

(478)

on February 05, 2011
at 03:59 PM

I just use my butcher knife and pound the meat manually :D

0
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on February 05, 2011
at 08:11 AM

I have a grinder attachment for my Kenwood Chef and it is great. A processor doesn't do the same job at all - it makes it into either chopped meat, or a paste.

I use mine to mince fat before rendering it into lard, to mince meat for burgers, sausage, chilli etc and to make pate.

I'm sure mince from a butcher is cheaper than meat because all sorts of off cuts and grim bits go in there - processing your own means you can check exactly what goes in each and every time.

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on February 04, 2011
at 04:43 PM

Main benefit. You are the one doing the grinding. If someone else does it, you never know if they've got a cold/washed their hands/etc... Is that really critical, your call.

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on February 04, 2011
at 05:12 PM

Grocery ground meat is like a box a chocolates...you never know what you're gonna get.

0
1471beca8e3adff4ae2f89d10e5f7acb

on February 04, 2011
at 04:37 PM

I'm getting the meat grinder attachment for my KitchenAid mostly so I can grind up liver to add to chili and meatloaf and such. Yay nuuuutrients!

E7be2ce38158357f5dacae07b43d1b29

on February 04, 2011
at 06:55 PM

This is what I have and I like it a lot. It's sturdy and easy to clean, and there are two plates so I can do course or finer grinds. I've also made good sausage with the adapter.

0
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on February 04, 2011
at 03:14 PM

I recommend a food processor instead of a stand-alone grinder, as long as you are ok with grinding in small batches. The main reason being the food processor is a multi-tasker. It's been awhile since I ground my own meat, but I think I used 8-10 pulses for "hamburger," and 5 for a rough chili grind.

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