1

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Eating raw irradiated beef

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 23, 2010 at 3:31 AM

I would like to prepare raw meat at home, but question the risks involved. I bought irradiated feedlot beef, thinking that the ecoli would be killed. I'm 17, and have been in good health while adjusting to the paleolithic diet, especially after recovering from vegetarianism.

Previously I could jog at least seven miles in an hour, and could run for an hour and half straight. Now I can run faster, but not as far.

On occasion I consume raw eggs and home-made fermented foods.

Does my immunity seem strong enough? Does anybody have experience eating home prepared raw meat, in particular irradiated, or have advice?

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on August 10, 2010
at 06:18 PM

I've eaten raw meat three times and extremely rare meat once, two of these were from irradiated meat, and I'm still alive.

Ab6d5fded95559985919961c62b1847d

(434)

on July 25, 2010
at 06:07 AM

IMO, risks with eating raw fish (and raw meat period for that matter) are exaggerated. As with the meat, get your fish from a good source and you should be fine.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on July 24, 2010
at 02:12 PM

Just to clarify, it doesn't have to end up warm if that's not desired... choose a thick cut and take it straight from the fridge to the (very preheated) pan or grill, work fast, and it'll still be very close to fridge-cold in the middle.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:48 AM

the unhealthy by-products of cooking and people enjoying them anyway.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:40 AM

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/7/4/367?maxtoshow=&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=meat+protein+heat&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT http://shkrobius.livejournal.com/214676.html I think I'm wrong about the protein. I didn't read either site, but the third paragraph on the 2nd page suggests that I was confused with denatured protein. Whatever. As for why bother cooking it, there is certainly the possibility that paleolithic tastes we just as adulterated as most Americans. Many people deliberately char their hotdogs to eat the black scrubby stuff, a fine example of...

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:13 AM

stomach is analogous to a professional weight lifter, why have him deadlift 5 pounds when he is capable of 500 pounds. If his muscles are continually understressed, they will surely atrophy. As this weightlifter is the stomach, a single component of the body, other organs will likely weaken as well. One may then argue that cooked meat is simply unnatural, and for that reason alone it is fine that it digests quicker. I believe protein becomes more digestible when it is cooked, which I would assume is wonderful. With more protein, more work is involved in utilizing it.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:05 AM

I haven't heard of people catching a virus from meat, only the dreaded cases of ecoli and salmonella. For some reason I thought irradiation nuked everything on the beef, but even with a nuke, there are still cockroaches. The ease of digestion appeals to me, especially as a previous vegetarian. Grains/beans seem to slide through you, but your body actually has to work to digest the meat. As a runner, the heaviness and thermogenic effect was unappealing. Ease of digestion may not necessarily be a good thing. The stomach (or the GI tract in general) operates in the body to digest. If the...

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:52 AM

This is somewhat irrelevant to the question of how one should eat raw feedlot beef, but an excellent point nevertheless. Why should I dwell and waver on eating raw feedlot beef, failing to collect enough evidence to affirm or refute the sensibility of such a decision when there is still that slight risk of poisoning even if I decide to eat it. The decision isn't science, although science might be discussed. Science as some may argue, myself included, is the end-all for procuring knowledge, yet no theory can be proven true, only proven false.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:45 AM

True. The fact that it will be warm is certainly a plus too. It seems silly to put oneself at risk over eating raw meat. If one has to be really anal about it, they can go about peeling the crust off.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:42 AM

I would have never considered freezing it. Thank you for the suggestion. What kind of bacterial infection is one at risk for when eating raw fish? I've always thought that one is more at risk from parasites in fish than bacteria. Since most fish is frozen for transportation, would it be more appropriate to eat? As Eva states, cooking meat at least rare seems like common sense, but the limited availability of quality raw meat and the knowledge that it can be eaten makes me very willing to try it.

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 23, 2010
at 07:31 AM

Concur on cooking your meats, if you like them rare that's fine.

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4 Answers

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2
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on July 23, 2010
at 04:11 AM

Irradiation at food grade doses does not kill viruses. Considering the unsanitary nature of modern slaughter houses and meat processing facilities, I prefer to cook my meat lightly to at least kill the germs on the outside. Some say that uncooked meat is more easily digested. I have no probs digesting my cooked meat so I am just not worried about it unless some research comes up to change my mind. I am more worried about germs than I am about digestion. Our ancestors going way back did cook their meat and they were healthy but no one knows for sure what was common practice way way back in the paleo. At some point, they probably ate raw. Customs also probably varied in different populations. One thing is for sure, cooked meat does taste good, which I do not think is entirely a coincidence. Ancient people spent the time to cook their meat. It would have saved a lot of time to just eat it raw. Why cook it? WHy even get in the habit of cooking instead of just ripping into it like other primates? It's an interesting question. Perhaps over time, those who cooked had less probs with parasites and so those people were more likely to survive? Just guessing here but it is an interesting subject to be sure. -Eva

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:48 AM

the unhealthy by-products of cooking and people enjoying them anyway.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:13 AM

stomach is analogous to a professional weight lifter, why have him deadlift 5 pounds when he is capable of 500 pounds. If his muscles are continually understressed, they will surely atrophy. As this weightlifter is the stomach, a single component of the body, other organs will likely weaken as well. One may then argue that cooked meat is simply unnatural, and for that reason alone it is fine that it digests quicker. I believe protein becomes more digestible when it is cooked, which I would assume is wonderful. With more protein, more work is involved in utilizing it.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:05 AM

I haven't heard of people catching a virus from meat, only the dreaded cases of ecoli and salmonella. For some reason I thought irradiation nuked everything on the beef, but even with a nuke, there are still cockroaches. The ease of digestion appeals to me, especially as a previous vegetarian. Grains/beans seem to slide through you, but your body actually has to work to digest the meat. As a runner, the heaviness and thermogenic effect was unappealing. Ease of digestion may not necessarily be a good thing. The stomach (or the GI tract in general) operates in the body to digest. If the...

1a8020e101199de55c1b3b726f342321

(1973)

on July 23, 2010
at 07:31 AM

Concur on cooking your meats, if you like them rare that's fine.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 04:40 AM

http://jn.nutrition.org/cgi/content/abstract/7/4/367?maxtoshow=&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=meat+protein+heat&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&resourcetype=HWCIT http://shkrobius.livejournal.com/214676.html I think I'm wrong about the protein. I didn't read either site, but the third paragraph on the 2nd page suggests that I was confused with denatured protein. Whatever. As for why bother cooking it, there is certainly the possibility that paleolithic tastes we just as adulterated as most Americans. Many people deliberately char their hotdogs to eat the black scrubby stuff, a fine example of...

2
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on July 23, 2010
at 01:35 PM

As Anthropologist Melvin Konner said, you can't just pick up meat from the supermarket and say you are doing the paleo diet. Feedlot beef is bad for the environment, the animals, and simply has different nutrient ratios than meat fed an appropriate diet. Why not call around to farms in your area? NYC Paleo has gotten grassfed meat for as little as $3.50 a lb this way! The bonus is that you are going to feel a lot more comfortable eating it raw if you've seen the farm and you know it's a good place. I personally eat raw meat from local small farms regularly and I've never had food poisoning from it.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:52 AM

This is somewhat irrelevant to the question of how one should eat raw feedlot beef, but an excellent point nevertheless. Why should I dwell and waver on eating raw feedlot beef, failing to collect enough evidence to affirm or refute the sensibility of such a decision when there is still that slight risk of poisoning even if I decide to eat it. The decision isn't science, although science might be discussed. Science as some may argue, myself included, is the end-all for procuring knowledge, yet no theory can be proven true, only proven false.

1
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on July 23, 2010
at 12:46 PM

I would at least sear the outside, on all sides. Do it fast over very high heat and you'll have what is functionally a raw steak with a 2-3mm margin of seared crust around the edges. Slice thin and enjoy.

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:45 AM

True. The fact that it will be warm is certainly a plus too. It seems silly to put oneself at risk over eating raw meat. If one has to be really anal about it, they can go about peeling the crust off.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on July 24, 2010
at 02:12 PM

Just to clarify, it doesn't have to end up warm if that's not desired... choose a thick cut and take it straight from the fridge to the (very preheated) pan or grill, work fast, and it'll still be very close to fridge-cold in the middle.

1
Ab6d5fded95559985919961c62b1847d

(434)

on July 23, 2010
at 04:55 AM

I've only recently started to add raw meat to my diet so I'm no expert by any means. But for what it's worth, I would suggest freezing the meat for something like two weeks before eating it raw. This will take care of parasites. As far as bacteria, if your get your meat from a quality source I wouldn't worry about it.

I also wouldn't worry about the running. It could be related to the food but it might not be. Not everything is a symptom. Some things just are. If it continues to be a problem, then maybe it's time to look for the cause.

Good luck :)

4bef28a94eda54b96aab3b7885769768

(18)

on July 24, 2010
at 03:42 AM

I would have never considered freezing it. Thank you for the suggestion. What kind of bacterial infection is one at risk for when eating raw fish? I've always thought that one is more at risk from parasites in fish than bacteria. Since most fish is frozen for transportation, would it be more appropriate to eat? As Eva states, cooking meat at least rare seems like common sense, but the limited availability of quality raw meat and the knowledge that it can be eaten makes me very willing to try it.

Ab6d5fded95559985919961c62b1847d

(434)

on July 25, 2010
at 06:07 AM

IMO, risks with eating raw fish (and raw meat period for that matter) are exaggerated. As with the meat, get your fish from a good source and you should be fine.

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