4

votes

does meat putrify or rot in your colon?

Answered on September 29, 2014
Created December 12, 2012 at 12:05 AM

Vegan and vegetarian propagandists claim that red meat and other animal flesh rots in your intestines. Where did they get this idea from? Does animal protein/flesh get fully absorbed by your body? Does it digest more efficiently than fibrous plant foods?

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on December 15, 2012
at 10:15 AM

If you think that eating animals is wrong then have the courage to just come out and say it. Spreading misinformation and making vacuous assertions only serve to weaken your position.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 13, 2012
at 12:33 AM

No doubt we do - coliform would be likely - but the food macronutrients are gone by then. Kellogg thought that by giving people yogurt enemas he could populate their GI tracts with good bacteria....literally ass-backwards thinking. Maybe that's where the term came from?

4c8a3f6cc7ed4444467d2e72de8021cd

(40)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:43 PM

Ah, yes, you are correct. Am I wrong in saying that we have bacteria in our large intestines?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:15 PM

Feces break down at the sewage treatment plant with bacteria and high aeration. Not in our anaerobic colons.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:13 PM

The colon just compacts and pushes it on through, possibly removing a little water. There's not enough time for anything to rot. UNLESS it sticks to the walls of the colon like Kellogg believed, and which is false.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:07 PM

The meat rots in colon nonsense originates in a belief that the walls of the colon coat up with well-digested food which rots there. This supposedly releases toxins which diffuse through the colon wall and poison the body. Never mind that these deposits don't occur, and that the colon is very impermeable (unless you subject it to enemas). Carbs, proteins and fats are far beyond enzymes and gut bacteria at this point.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:20 PM

Yes, you are right. However, the question was, "does meat rot in the colon?". And the answer is, of course not. My point was that carbs do ferment in colon--not meat.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:59 PM

Chalk it up to Kellogg.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:56 PM

Asterisk to go?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:50 PM

?Amylase digestion of starch starts in the mouth. Digestion of both starches and proteins is complete before the small intestine, and high glycemic carbs are not slow in reaching the bloodstream. If you're talking about non digestible carbs they would linger through the colon. But easy to digest carbs don't last long enough to rot in the lower GI.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 12, 2012
at 07:46 PM

@thhq, he's definitely not joking. Trolling is serious business! :)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:23 PM

On the chance that you're not joking I took the liberty of downvoting. Give us a factual defense of the idea instead of hyperbole please.

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:55 AM

Could I just eat 30 bananas a day instead of the colon cleanse?

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on December 12, 2012
at 06:56 AM

Chimps hunt and butcher monkeys. That's called "altruism!"

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:45 AM

There is no credible scientific evidence that flesh rots down below -- and besides, why would the body waste such a fantastic source of nutrients? I think grains rot the brain though and make peeps believe the most ridiculous things! Perhaps chalk it up to confirmation bias and wishful thinking.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Haha that was funny

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:30 AM

Grains and legumes are very problematic for me. My abdomen actually distended (sticks out) when i regularly ate these. People though i was 6 months pregnant. Also cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts and cauliflower make me a little gassy, but much less than grains and beans.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Grains and legumes are very problematic for me. My abdomen actually distended (sticks out) when i regularly ate these. Also cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cabbage, brussel srpouts and cauliflower make me a little gassy, but much less than grains and beans.

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13 Answers

10
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:49 AM

Yeah, humans can pretty effectively digest meat. Actually, so can certain apes:

To investigate the capacity of chimpanzees to digest meat, feeding trials were carried out on three captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) using a fixed amount of nonpurified diet with and without a predetermined amount of boned cooked chicken.

So what happened?

"The results showed no significant differences in the rate of passage of digesta and digestion of diets with and without chicken. Meat ingestion did not change the nitrogen (N) concentration of feces or the total amount of N defecated. Visual inspection of fecal matter showed no evidence of undigested meat. Taken together, the results indicate that chimpanzees are able to digest meat of the type and quantity consumed during these trials

Digesting meat; so easy a primate could do it.

Ciation:

http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/ajp.1350180105/abstract

47edf681280750c3712a3a56f2eae33b

on December 12, 2012
at 06:56 AM

Chimps hunt and butcher monkeys. That's called "altruism!"

9
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on December 12, 2012
at 12:49 AM

Proteins found in meat are digested by pepsin and HCl in the stomach. Fats are digested by lipase enzymes. Carbs are digested in the large intestine by gut bacteria. If anything then, veggies and other carbs are what rot (ferment) in our intestines.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:07 PM

The meat rots in colon nonsense originates in a belief that the walls of the colon coat up with well-digested food which rots there. This supposedly releases toxins which diffuse through the colon wall and poison the body. Never mind that these deposits don't occur, and that the colon is very impermeable (unless you subject it to enemas). Carbs, proteins and fats are far beyond enzymes and gut bacteria at this point.

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:20 PM

Yes, you are right. However, the question was, "does meat rot in the colon?". And the answer is, of course not. My point was that carbs do ferment in colon--not meat.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:50 PM

?Amylase digestion of starch starts in the mouth. Digestion of both starches and proteins is complete before the small intestine, and high glycemic carbs are not slow in reaching the bloodstream. If you're talking about non digestible carbs they would linger through the colon. But easy to digest carbs don't last long enough to rot in the lower GI.

7
0faecc3397025eab246241f4dcd81f5e

(2361)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:14 AM

WE can usually fully digest meat proteins into single amino acids, via pepsin, HCL and peptidases. We have difficulty digesting gluten proteins and casein proteins into single amino acids. Different amino acids require different enzymes to break them down, and we don't break down prolamines well. So grain and dairy proteins are the ones we don't digest well.

6
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on December 12, 2012
at 12:36 AM

It doesn't. But if they say it does, you will pay money for a high colonic. During that colonic, you will see that stinky gross stuff comes out your butt. Of course it does.

There was a rumour that I heard once that John Wayne died with forty punds of undigested meat in his colon. I don't know who makes that sh*t up.

Pun fully intended.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:41 AM

Haha that was funny

4
Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 04:08 AM

The origins of this idea interest me. The subject of food rot in the bowels is closely tied to the detoxification industry, which regards many foods as potential rotters. Meat is on the list, along with fatty diets and overeating in general. The suspected rot problem is typically treated with enemas. I tried to find some Kellogg quotes since he was into enema therapy 100 years ago, but I could not find any.

Here's a pretty good outline: /dict.aspx?word=detoxification">http://medical-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com//dict.aspx?word=detoxification

Edit: The term used for this assumed colonic putrefaction/toxicity is "autointoxication", and there was great interest in it until about 1920. High fiber diets developed partly because they were purgative, and yogurt was used as both a cleansing food and enema. The connection with vegetarianism is strongest through Kellogg and the Seventh Day Adventists, but there was worldwide acceptance of the theory at that time. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/m/pubmed/9252839/

The following article has a good line about the modern interest in the colon-as-cesspool logic: "you can't keep a crappy idea down". http://www.livescience.com/947-colon-cleansing-money-toilet.html

3
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on December 12, 2012
at 12:23 AM

Neither... that's totally absurd. I have no idea where this myth comes from, except an obvious attempt to make meat-eating sound gross.

When I eat a lot of meat, I usually have perfect digestion, with no gas, bloating, or other digestive problems. Legumes on the other hand give me lots of problems, particularly beans like black beans, and so does what, corn, and "bad" oils. I think it is a lot more likely that those things putrefy or rot, or at lest don't digest well, than meat.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:30 AM

Grains and legumes are very problematic for me. My abdomen actually distended (sticks out) when i regularly ate these. People though i was 6 months pregnant. Also cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cabbage, brussel sprouts and cauliflower make me a little gassy, but much less than grains and beans.

5c9fda2bd0018516806bba200a93f6fa

(608)

on December 12, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Grains and legumes are very problematic for me. My abdomen actually distended (sticks out) when i regularly ate these. Also cruciferous veggies like broccoli, cabbage, brussel srpouts and cauliflower make me a little gassy, but much less than grains and beans.

1
4c8a3f6cc7ed4444467d2e72de8021cd

on December 12, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Sorry if this was already stated, but by the time any food material gets to the colon (large intestine), it will have been digested and broken down a great extent. Am i wrong to say that any food product, whether grain vegetable or meat, is not in its original form after passing through the mouth stomach and small intestines? Can we still call meat meat after it is broken down and has a majority of its proteins and fats and minerals taken from it, leaving behind the indigestible products? the same goes for any food material. And the term "rotting" simply means the breakdown of organic material by organisms such as fungus or bacteria. The colon is filled with bacteria which eats the indigestible material and then producing methane, the reason for gas and the stench of fecal matter. Is saying that MEAT rots in the colon implying that it is not digested in any way through out the rest of the system? Unless we put a piece of meat directly into the colon, can there actually be the full component of meat inside the colon, and even so, the meat would have to rot, for there is a plethora of bacteria in the colon, that is how organic matter decomposes. The colon should be "rotting" (further breaking down) indigestible material in order to get the most out of what we consume, but it is breaking down feces (the parts of food which are not digested anywhere else), not complete foods.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:13 PM

The colon just compacts and pushes it on through, possibly removing a little water. There's not enough time for anything to rot. UNLESS it sticks to the walls of the colon like Kellogg believed, and which is false.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:15 PM

Feces break down at the sewage treatment plant with bacteria and high aeration. Not in our anaerobic colons.

4c8a3f6cc7ed4444467d2e72de8021cd

(40)

on December 12, 2012
at 11:43 PM

Ah, yes, you are correct. Am I wrong in saying that we have bacteria in our large intestines?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 13, 2012
at 12:33 AM

No doubt we do - coliform would be likely - but the food macronutrients are gone by then. Kellogg thought that by giving people yogurt enemas he could populate their GI tracts with good bacteria....literally ass-backwards thinking. Maybe that's where the term came from?

1
0322015c4939fe66483d9af05079ad87

on December 12, 2012
at 08:11 PM

My digestion is as its best when eating enough meat. Colon: period.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 09:56 PM

Asterisk to go?

1
Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on December 12, 2012
at 07:14 PM

Please read this if you're afraid of the whole "meat rotting in your colon" nonsense...

http://www.gnolls.org/1444/does-meat-rot-in-your-colon-no-what-does-beans-grains-and-vegetables/

1
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on December 12, 2012
at 03:26 AM

Everything rots in your colon and it's a good thing. Also here and here.

0
Aa1f8354ecab8cb5e13f8ec6862db500

on September 29, 2014
at 03:18 PM

 veg food decomposes by probiotic fermentation ,animal foods decompose through pathogenic putrification

0
5bac45c78a2be60bc17fc2084a0f5d43

(259)

on December 12, 2012
at 06:14 AM

AFAIK people with healthy levels of HCL and enzymes should not have meat rotting in the guts. Fermentation is healthy when it happens in large intestine (not small) and targets of fermentation are naturally resistant starch and fiber.

-4
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on September 07, 2013
at 12:44 AM

YES!!! It will!!! Meat is really terrible for your colon, if you've been ingesting it for a long time it's a good idea to do a colon cleanse!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 12, 2012
at 07:46 PM

@thhq, he's definitely not joking. Trolling is serious business! :)

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on December 12, 2012
at 10:55 AM

Could I just eat 30 bananas a day instead of the colon cleanse?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 12, 2012
at 01:23 PM

On the chance that you're not joking I took the liberty of downvoting. Give us a factual defense of the idea instead of hyperbole please.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on December 15, 2012
at 10:15 AM

If you think that eating animals is wrong then have the courage to just come out and say it. Spreading misinformation and making vacuous assertions only serve to weaken your position.

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