1

votes

Diabetes risk in grilled meat... Seriously?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 25, 2012 at 7:27 PM

Yet another meat "linked to diabetes" risk...

Has anyone read this? Anyone that is more up to date on the subject than me. http://www.express.co.uk/posts/view/341837/Diabetes-risk-in-grilled-meat

Da12b342d4959f5bd776c0f00b072a6c

(311)

on August 26, 2012
at 12:09 AM

@Pernissila - Pressure cooking temperatures are not as high as grilling/pan frying temperatures. "In an ordinary non-pressurised cooking vessel, the boiling point of water is 100 °C (212 °F) at standard pressure; pressure of 15 psi (103 kPa) above atmospheric pressure, water in a pressure cooker can reach a temperature of up to 121 °C (250 °F)."

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 25, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Glycation is a dehydrative process, so the char is sort of essential for AGE formation. Just speaking from the chemical POV.

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on August 25, 2012
at 09:27 PM

Could pressure cooking also produce the same kind of effect then? Because of the high temperature i mean?

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2 Answers

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1
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on August 25, 2012
at 08:28 PM

Although some may dismiss this study, I think there is a nugget of truth to it. Helen Vlassara's work (including the study in question) suggests that dietary Advanced Glycation Endproducts (or AGE's) may contribute to worsened insulin resistance. Since grilled meat is a large source of AGE's, this is why some believe such foods increase risk of diabetes. There are various controlled studies suggesting this as well.

However, there are other studies suggesting (to me) that it's high heat cooking in general that exerts these negative effects and AGE's are fingered due to being a marker of the consumption of such foods.

So why does high heat cooking have such effects? Maybe it's the AGE's, or the HCA's, or the lipid peroxides, or the destroyed nutrients, or the less bioavailable minerals, or the increased tastiness, or a combination of these and other factors we might not even know about yet. I don't know. But I do know it's probably not a bad idea to avoid eating all your food burned to a crisp.

I certainly do grill from time to time, when I do I just try to reduce possible risks via marinating and having tea with my meat (I enjoy that combination).

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 25, 2012
at 09:47 PM

Glycation is a dehydrative process, so the char is sort of essential for AGE formation. Just speaking from the chemical POV.

Da12b342d4959f5bd776c0f00b072a6c

(311)

on August 26, 2012
at 12:09 AM

@Pernissila - Pressure cooking temperatures are not as high as grilling/pan frying temperatures. "In an ordinary non-pressurised cooking vessel, the boiling point of water is 100 °C (212 °F) at standard pressure; pressure of 15 psi (103 kPa) above atmospheric pressure, water in a pressure cooker can reach a temperature of up to 121 °C (250 °F)."

05e260e5bc2acedf51dd24535e2060c9

on August 25, 2012
at 09:27 PM

Could pressure cooking also produce the same kind of effect then? Because of the high temperature i mean?

0
Cccb899526fb5908f64176e0a74ed2d9

(2801)

on August 25, 2012
at 08:57 PM

Study: comparison of the effects of an iso-compositional, iso-caloric (i.e. same stuff) meat source prepared two ways - grilled and steamed - on glucose tolerance when paired with a set amount of carbohydrate (e.g. 100g white rice).

Hmmmmmmm

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