0

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Cooking Ground Beef in Water

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 13, 2011 at 3:17 AM

I was wondering if I had some ground beef if it was a good idea to cook it in water. I wanted to cook it or brown it in a pan but I could be losing a lot of the nutrients that way as the beef is in contact with the heat source or pan throughout and the butter; B-12 and other nutrients are also likely lost in this process because it sticks to the pan and the less dense liquid is probably what is left.

Also, using the same cooking utensil throughout the cooking process, even with a rinse in between, is possibly an issue that I just realized after years of doing it. And I don't feel like washing the spoon or whatever multiple times until it is cooked.

So if I cooked it in water, what is a good method of doing it as I have done some research on it and most of the time it says boil but I am not sure if that is the best way but maybe a lengthier slow cook. I am going to drink the water also after LOL, it'll be a stew of some kind. Thank you for anyone who has any advice or who has tried to help.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on December 14, 2011
at 06:19 AM

I'm upvoting because while I think this is a stupid-ass thing to even be thinking about (you're gonna burn out hard and fast if you keep this up) you have a really good attitude. Well done.

361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on December 14, 2011
at 01:38 AM

or if you can afford it is throw a yoke in! mmmmmmmmm. Keeps it tender.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on December 13, 2011
at 11:27 PM

reminds me of that Arrested Development where Portia de Rossi's character prepares "hot ham water".

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 13, 2011
at 11:25 PM

I'll take a pass on burger broth. :P

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:12 PM

gotta love a good sport! rock on with yr (scrupulously well-done) burger juice!

724ba4f39f7bbea7f74b45c0a79615f2

(1968)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:06 PM

Yeah, for the most part, if it's not meat I'd eat raw (yes, I love me some raw meat), then it's probably not meat I'll eat cooked (unless I eat out, in which case I pretend). But that being said, ground meat is the most likely to have bacteria all over it, since it's been through a grinder. Still, I'm not really sure it's worth washing your utensils multiple times while cooking.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:47 PM

doesn't everyone? lol

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:46 PM

yes, but he wants to drink the hamburger broth.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:44 PM

!!! if i had some meat that i thought could poison me with trace amounts of it's raw juices, i'm quite sure I would not be cooking/eating it at all.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:44 PM

!!! if i had some meat that i thought could poison me with trace amounts of it's raw juices, i'm quite sure I would not be cooking/eating it all.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 13, 2011
at 07:18 PM

There are no xenoestrogens in polyethylene bags, so that's not a concern.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:42 PM

Your not going to like it boiled. Here is what I do, pan cook it until its almost not pink anymore, then, crack 2-6 eggs over the top of it, mix it up, the eggs will soak up the fat (i use 3% fat beef usually), top with whatever you like, I eat this almost everyday.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 13, 2011
at 03:54 PM

Well, I do wash my utensil several times during the cooking process. I've had severe food poisoning enough times that I'm paranoid and proud.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on December 13, 2011
at 03:10 PM

Aye - I make a big pot of stew every Sunday - this can last us until Wed - Thurs.

76c885d7d27e6c83542ea493ca866dcd

(2178)

on December 13, 2011
at 01:17 PM

I think the issue with the same utensil is that bacteria, etc from the raw meat may remain on the utensil, which transfers that back into the almost cooked meat? maybe?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:03 AM

I'd be more worried about xenoestrogens and other crap leeching in from the plastic bag, as it softens, into the food than the nutrients in the beef leeching out into the water!

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:27 AM

I am not concerned with the leaching because I will be drinking the water but I understand what you are saying. But I will still try to do this for a while.

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:27 AM

I am not concerned with the leaching because I will be drinking the water but I understand what you are saying. But I will still try to do this for a while.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 04:32 AM

i think this whole question is sort of insane, but especially the part about the cooking utensil. what on earth is the "issue"!?

0a2dd50f2d3951bf3fb83fc4638c9512

(1960)

on December 13, 2011
at 04:26 AM

Suppose it's doable. Just doesn't sound at all appetizing.

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11 Answers

10
Medium avatar

(2301)

on December 13, 2011
at 04:35 AM

you are overthinking it. don't eat boiled ground beef. :(

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 13, 2011
at 12:32 PM

What makes you think that the B12 comes out of the meat and sticks to the pan? That's a pretty weird notion. Heck, cooking meat in boiling water is likely more efficient for extracting B vitamins from beef than cooking in butter. B vitamins are water-soluble after all.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on December 13, 2011
at 11:25 PM

I'll take a pass on burger broth. :P

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on December 13, 2011
at 11:27 PM

reminds me of that Arrested Development where Portia de Rossi's character prepares "hot ham water".

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:47 PM

doesn't everyone? lol

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 08:46 PM

yes, but he wants to drink the hamburger broth.

3
C4134ed417dbc0a6b79ab2cee32632d3

(1801)

on December 13, 2011
at 03:50 PM

Instead of frying or boiling, why not just chuck it in a slow cooker with some other ingredients (tomatoes, stock/broth & spices) to make a curry/stew/casserole). I have to say, slow cooked curries are pretty good.

This way, your water stays with the meat.

3
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 13, 2011
at 03:29 AM

I've done it both ways and I definitely enjoy the taste of browned ground beef more than boiled, so I brown it and then add broth/stew/sauce to the skillet so I get all the nutrients from both. And, of course, any vegetables I want to add are cooked right in the broth.

Adding liquid once the meat is browned de-glazes the pan so the problem of things sticking is eliminated.

2
Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on December 13, 2011
at 09:57 PM

Thank you all for your responses and discussion as it has been valuable. I definitely understand what most of you are saying and I have laughed about it myself. I am just concerned as it is a reasonable possibility. Heat releases and unbinds nutrients and puts them through a very unique process so whether they are water or fat soluble they often bind to fluid or become "loose" and the juice on the pan is more than just fat; it is water of course and probably a good amount of nutrients. And really it isn't a bad idea to consider some new ideas. It really isn't that much of a new idea anyway because it is basically a stew, without double cooking the meat and cooked quicker. But I am trying to avoid boiling it. But thank you all for the discussion as this is humorous as well.

559aa134ff5e6c8bcd608ba8dc505628

(3631)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:12 PM

gotta love a good sport! rock on with yr (scrupulously well-done) burger juice!

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on December 14, 2011
at 06:19 AM

I'm upvoting because while I think this is a stupid-ass thing to even be thinking about (you're gonna burn out hard and fast if you keep this up) you have a really good attitude. Well done.

2
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:09 AM

Why not make Chilli out of it? At least it'll taste much better.

I do it like this: chop up some onion, garlic and saute with ghee (or grassfed butter or extra virgin coconut oil). Throw in some turmeric, cayenne pepper, salt, pepper, sage, oregano, chopped serano peppers, tomato, stir it a bit and saute some more. Throw in the beef and stir it up until it's cooked and eat.

You could even add some chopped mushrooms in there too.

66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on December 13, 2011
at 03:10 PM

Aye - I make a big pot of stew every Sunday - this can last us until Wed - Thurs.

2
1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

on December 13, 2011
at 04:14 AM

Just cook it in a pan and don't burn any of it. There is no way to not lose any nutrients due to cooking other than eating it raw. If its not grass fed directly from the farm, I would not suggest doing that. Boiling it will remove as much if not more of the nutrients as pan cooking it.

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:27 AM

I am not concerned with the leaching because I will be drinking the water but I understand what you are saying. But I will still try to do this for a while.

1c67bc28f4e44bbb8770b86df0463df3

(6719)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:42 PM

Your not going to like it boiled. Here is what I do, pan cook it until its almost not pink anymore, then, crack 2-6 eggs over the top of it, mix it up, the eggs will soak up the fat (i use 3% fat beef usually), top with whatever you like, I eat this almost everyday.

0
361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on December 14, 2011
at 01:36 AM

I'm the same way and do this all the time the trick is (if it doesn't gross you out) is seperate the meat and the blood. boil the meat and then add the blood back in for full flavour/ nutrition

361e96d70d6d3b91d63f6ad975e60ab6

(840)

on December 14, 2011
at 01:38 AM

or if you can afford it is throw a yoke in! mmmmmmmmm. Keeps it tender.

0
Bdede2dbc411f2533a7e6f13674ade51

(804)

on December 13, 2011
at 07:10 AM

meat fondue, anyone? http://www.bestfondue.com/meat-fondue-recipes.html Not saying it's good or bad in regards to Paleo, but it's fairly common to find it on the menu in the European Alps (and I'm sure other places). I didn't care for it at all. Very bland and colorless and just not all that appetizing.

0
07842fbab8730403ef284e655083fe0e

(218)

on December 13, 2011
at 04:51 AM

I grew up on frequent meals of boiled mince (thickened with flour) and frozen vegetables - a very cheap meal for a poor family at the time. I prefer frying over boiling, these days, and adding a little liquid later (home-made broth is a good addition). And if you want to thicken it, a little potato starch/flour does a good job. Be generous with seasonings, though, as it can be a bit bland.

Of course, these days I get more pleasure from steak with a half-stick of butter on the side - and I think nutrients in a piece of steak would survive cooking better than the same quantity of mince.

0
C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

on December 13, 2011
at 04:48 AM

Don't boil it. If you're really concerned, put it in a vacuum bag and sous vide it to medium rare. At least then the flavor and nutrition won't just leach into the water.

Aa1f07e23a47aed0d07b712645e0d213

(313)

on December 13, 2011
at 06:27 AM

I am not concerned with the leaching because I will be drinking the water but I understand what you are saying. But I will still try to do this for a while.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on December 13, 2011
at 10:03 AM

I'd be more worried about xenoestrogens and other crap leeching in from the plastic bag, as it softens, into the food than the nutrients in the beef leeching out into the water!

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on December 13, 2011
at 07:18 PM

There are no xenoestrogens in polyethylene bags, so that's not a concern.

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