3

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Canning and Preserving Meats

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 05, 2010 at 10:55 AM

I am interested in preserving meats. Pemmican and Jerky are fine short term, but I'm looking for long term, no refrigeration type preservation. Has anyone canned meat without a pressure cooker? Does anyone have any pickling recipes that don't make everything taste like a garlic Dill pickle? What about salting/curing? Is there a way to do that without nitrates and sugar? Thanks in advance. Mike

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on March 11, 2010
at 02:58 AM

Not terribly prevalent. About 110 cases/yr. Most are infants infected from soil. Symptoms show in 3-5 days, mortality with treatment is 2%, but can require months in hospital with assisted breathing. How many eat low acid home canned goods? Boil for 20 mins before serving.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:38 AM

Yep, that's what I've read. However, my question now is "how prevelent is botulism that you'd need to raise the temperature another 30 degrees?"

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:36 AM

Separate freezer is a luxury it can't afford right now but a good idea none the less. My main concern is utility failure though, so I'm looking for a solution along those lines. I've been researching jerky and pemmican, they last a lot longer than I was led to believe, especially pemmican.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:33 AM

Oh yeah, the perils of canning! Reminds me of some homemade root beer stories!

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:29 AM

Thanks. That sounds like making jerky and the article says it has a 6 month shelf life, I'd like to go longer than that.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:25 AM

I'm talking at least a year, if not more. We just got a 1/4 of a grass fed beef and it's just my wife and I. We don't want any freezer burn to take place so I thought of canning.

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 02:46 AM

eeeeew. sounds not very tasty...

60b0d3e60670f645cca59f67710b4820

(399)

on March 05, 2010
at 09:21 PM

Why wouldn't you consider desiccation, e.g. pemmican or jerky long term?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 05, 2010
at 04:28 PM

How long do you plan to store the preserved meat Mike? I know salmon can be canned in a water bath, but have never done meat. I imagine you'd need to be very careful and not let it get off the low boil. Even canned food has a shelf life.

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6 Answers

2
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 05, 2010
at 07:00 PM

Also, can't forget confit. The latest WAPF newsletter had a letter where someone described how people in Greece used to preserve meat in fat with salt. "Sealed and stored in a cool place, confit can last for several months." If I were storing it outside the fridge, I would make sure the meat is absolutely buried in the fat. When I would go to eat it, I would discard the top layer of fat because it's probably oxidized.

2
9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 05, 2010
at 01:12 PM

I just saw this is in a local blog and it might apply: Chinese meat drying.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:29 AM

Thanks. That sounds like making jerky and the article says it has a 6 month shelf life, I'd like to go longer than that.

1
6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on March 10, 2010
at 12:17 AM

For a quarter carcass, you should use a separate freezer that you do not open very frequently. You do not want the temperature to fluctuate much. Freezer burn comes from air exposure, so airtight packaging would prevent that. Properly packaged in a good freezer, meat should last for years.

Dried meat will literally last forever if stored in CO2 or nitrogen. When people say that confit or jerky will only last a few months, they are just avoiding lawsuits.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:36 AM

Separate freezer is a luxury it can't afford right now but a good idea none the less. My main concern is utility failure though, so I'm looking for a solution along those lines. I've been researching jerky and pemmican, they last a lot longer than I was led to believe, especially pemmican.

1
13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on March 09, 2010
at 09:25 PM

Boiling water is 212 degrees botulism spores die at 240 degrees

More info here: http://pressurecookerrecipes22484.yuku.com/topic/1073/t/canning-meat.html

And here: http://www.foodsaving.com/canning_guide/

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 10, 2010
at 10:38 AM

Yep, that's what I've read. However, my question now is "how prevelent is botulism that you'd need to raise the temperature another 30 degrees?"

13c5a9f1678d75b93f269cdcf69f14d5

(2339)

on March 11, 2010
at 02:58 AM

Not terribly prevalent. About 110 cases/yr. Most are infants infected from soil. Symptoms show in 3-5 days, mortality with treatment is 2%, but can require months in hospital with assisted breathing. How many eat low acid home canned goods? Boil for 20 mins before serving.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on February 16, 2011
at 07:49 PM

I bought a pressure canner and also want to can meat. I've read a few blogs like backwoods home and other off the grid sites, that suggest pressure canning meat is very doable. So many people get scared off food preservation. I always ask myself who has the most to gain by scaring me off being self-reliant? That said, Canning takes practice and patience so gain skills by doing easy safe projects before graduating to more difficult types of canning.

Basically you want to be scrupulously clean, follow recipes for times and weights. Make sure your lids and glass jars are oil and grease free. (use vinegar to wipe rims) Check your seals by holding the jar by the edge of the lid after canning. If it doesn't open then it is a tight seal (do this over the sink or with your hand below just in case)

I want to start by doing my own oil packed canned tuna and also can beef/game and stocks as well. Canning meat can be a great alternative for people with small living spaces or don't have room for a freezer.

Pressure canning is great because it really expands the variety of stuff you can put up in jars. Plus you don't have to change the flavor of foods by adding acid and/or lots of salt.

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 08, 2010
at 01:09 AM

Also, you can use a pressure cooker with GREAT care. We once did a restoration clean-up of a meat canning job gone awry- the whole mess blew up and contaminated everything including the inside of the refrigerator.

23814fb403606c0424bf90770dd5c0f5

(477)

on March 08, 2010
at 11:33 AM

Oh yeah, the perils of canning! Reminds me of some homemade root beer stories!

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on March 08, 2010
at 02:46 AM

eeeeew. sounds not very tasty...

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