4

votes

What kind of meat is in "season" especially for northwest?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 06, 2012 at 7:40 PM

It is easy enough to find out what vegetables are locally in season however I am having a harder time with the meat. I ran a brief search on here for seasonal meat and turned up nothing.

I frequent the farmers market however even this is not a great source of information. With the advent of deep freezers a veritable cornucopia of protein is available all year round. I would just love a general idea of what a hunter/gatherer society would be nomming on each season? And hopefully how to best emulate this?

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 07, 2012
at 02:30 AM

True.. I just mean food wise? It must be very difficult to feed a baby during winter. I always figured that is why there was mating seasons (so that the births would happen during a certain time of year)

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 07, 2012
at 02:30 AM

ahhahahaha I love it!

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on September 07, 2012
at 12:00 AM

I really like to say weiner. I am also 12. :)

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Do they really have a choice about when they give birth? Humans give birth in the middle of the winter and we're a lot smarter than pigs and chickens. So whether it sucks or not, they are probably doing it.

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 11:34 PM

I want a cow that is not fed anything at all during the months of the year when the grass doesn't grow, a cow that hibernates during the winter.

8de9776490016df60d49e03f23d656af

(596)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Grass fed can be corn finished--as far as I know, all cattle are grass fed to a certain point. You want to look for 100% grass fed or grass finished :)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:27 PM

^ Hey come on. I was my mother's early Christmas present. How much better can it get than that? ;)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:22 PM

Great minds....

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:21 PM

LOL! I was going to say that blondes in Uggs are coming up shortly.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:21 PM

LOL. I was going to say blondes with Uggs is coming up soon.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:20 PM

I would say in the case of the PNW, probably mostly game and smoked/salted fish. But, if you're talking livestock (domesticated), traditionally pigs were butchered before the winter. Chickens I think most of the year, but more summer/fall. Beef I believe tends to be butchered in the fall, but I'm less sure of that one. Eggs definitely not during the winter, at least in quantity, since hens generally stop laying regularly with short days.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:38 PM

...lol...k? you said weiner *beavis/butthead laugh

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:37 PM

A meat/fish CSA might be a good idea! Ill look into it

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:37 PM

I had no idea that eggs had a season!

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:35 PM

It does make sense that we would have eaten more meat in the winter than plants Im just curious as to what meat that would have been.=)

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:34 PM

I dont know but I imagine it would suck to give birth in the middle of winter.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:07 PM

I'm finding New England to be a little more difficult. I have a meat CSA and a fish CSA, and I just eat what they give us. The only thing that's "in season" here in the winter, animal or vegetable, is oysters. So I go to town on oysters in January/February. :)

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on September 06, 2012
at 09:00 PM

Not necessarily, 100% grass fed just gets hay in the Winter. Grass fed can't have grains. All of your standard beef is corn finished no matter what the season is and grass fed is never corn finished.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 06, 2012
at 08:38 PM

** Salmon season should be easy enough to figure out. It's in season when markets like Pike Place start having specials on the stuff. That's usually July-ish, if I am remembering correctly. (I've been away for a few years.)

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on September 06, 2012
at 07:59 PM

they "finish" it with grains. So it eats grass for part of its life, then grains. Not sure, though, if the butcher would still call it grassfed - I don't think they would.

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 07:53 PM

So presuming you are eating a cow that is more than a few months old what do they feed it during the months when there is no grass on the ground?

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10 Answers

3
26b0f1261d1a0d916825bd0deeb96a21

(5798)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:11 PM

The Pacific Northwest, you say? I think flannel-flank should be coming into season at the end of the month :)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:21 PM

LOL. I was going to say blondes with Uggs is coming up soon.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:22 PM

Great minds....

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:21 PM

LOL! I was going to say that blondes in Uggs are coming up shortly.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 07, 2012
at 02:30 AM

ahhahahaha I love it!

3
F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on September 06, 2012
at 07:50 PM

Grassfed meat DEFINITELY has a season since grass is not on the ground year round (at least not where I live). My butcher told me the best season to buy grassfed is summer-fall. So last year I bought $500 of meat in October, froze it and it lasted me til end of spring.

8de9776490016df60d49e03f23d656af

(596)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Grass fed can be corn finished--as far as I know, all cattle are grass fed to a certain point. You want to look for 100% grass fed or grass finished :)

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 07:53 PM

So presuming you are eating a cow that is more than a few months old what do they feed it during the months when there is no grass on the ground?

E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on September 06, 2012
at 09:00 PM

Not necessarily, 100% grass fed just gets hay in the Winter. Grass fed can't have grains. All of your standard beef is corn finished no matter what the season is and grass fed is never corn finished.

F92e4ca55291c3f3096a3d4d3d854986

(11698)

on September 06, 2012
at 07:59 PM

they "finish" it with grains. So it eats grass for part of its life, then grains. Not sure, though, if the butcher would still call it grassfed - I don't think they would.

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 11:34 PM

I want a cow that is not fed anything at all during the months of the year when the grass doesn't grow, a cow that hibernates during the winter.

2
90f66d30d977b07694403b469b3f85c5

on September 06, 2012
at 07:46 PM

I never thought meat could be in or out of season, unless you're talking about things that hibernate. I could be completely wrong though.

2
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 07:45 PM

I don't think animals are seasonal like plants. Don't chickens and pigs reproduce pretty much all the time?

59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on September 06, 2012
at 11:35 PM

Do they really have a choice about when they give birth? Humans give birth in the middle of the winter and we're a lot smarter than pigs and chickens. So whether it sucks or not, they are probably doing it.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 07, 2012
at 02:30 AM

True.. I just mean food wise? It must be very difficult to feed a baby during winter. I always figured that is why there was mating seasons (so that the births would happen during a certain time of year)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:27 PM

^ Hey come on. I was my mother's early Christmas present. How much better can it get than that? ;)

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:34 PM

I dont know but I imagine it would suck to give birth in the middle of winter.

1
Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

on September 06, 2012
at 10:17 PM

In Autumn, when you look up and see the glorious herds of bovine flying in a weiner formation South, it is the season for steak. This is also the reason for not wearing white after labour day, as falling cow paddies wreak havoc on a pristine white suit.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:38 PM

...lol...k? you said weiner *beavis/butthead laugh

Cc3ce03985eac5ebcbb95fc2329f13b0

(7370)

on September 07, 2012
at 12:00 AM

I really like to say weiner. I am also 12. :)

1
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:05 PM

The pacific northwest is fun:

Copper River Salmon is typically available in May.

We catch crawdads/crayfish in late August.

Lots of lamb grow in the Willamette Valley in Oregon, and I think they're usually slaughtered late summer or early autumn.

Hunting season for deer is late September to mid-/late- October.

Hunting season for grouse and pheasant looks to be around November/December.

We usually go razor clamming in December and January.

And then domestic animals like chicken, goats, and cows can round out the gaps. And I would imagine there would be a seasonality to fishing, too. I haven't been able to go fishing, but my in-laws bring us trout and landlocked salmon that they catch when we all go camping in the summer.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on September 06, 2012
at 10:07 PM

I'm finding New England to be a little more difficult. I have a meat CSA and a fish CSA, and I just eat what they give us. The only thing that's "in season" here in the winter, animal or vegetable, is oysters. So I go to town on oysters in January/February. :)

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:37 PM

A meat/fish CSA might be a good idea! Ill look into it

1
E791387b2829c660292308092dc3ca9b

(831)

on September 06, 2012
at 09:09 PM

Depends on what you mean by seasonal. For game the seasons we use today are based on the best time to hunt while still preserving reproduction. So the hunting season tends to be in the Fall and early Winter. Some animals reproduce more rapidly so seasons are open on them like feral hogs and rabbits. I highly doubt Grok followed any sort of hunting season most of his hunting would have just been based on opportunity. Fish have seasons when they are running and easy to catch and I am sure Grok did follow those.

Obviously Grok was not eating farmed animals so you can either follow the older pre-freezer patterns of farms which means butchering in the Fall and early Winter, eating a lot of meat fresh and then preserving the rest. Poultry was eaten year around and egg production is heavy in the Spring, good in the Summer and then chickens on a natural cycle go into molt later in the year and egg production drops dramatically. So if you eating Winter eggs they are produced using artificial conditions and they stress out the birds.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:37 PM

I had no idea that eggs had a season!

1
E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

on September 06, 2012
at 08:36 PM

Fish should be in season in the PNW right now. Eggs are in season as well. Grass-fed dairy, also, if you do that.

And I second LastingOne's suggestion of looking at hunting laws, etc.

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 06, 2012
at 08:38 PM

** Salmon season should be easy enough to figure out. It's in season when markets like Pike Place start having specials on the stuff. That's usually July-ish, if I am remembering correctly. (I've been away for a few years.)

1
Bd142c32b4055224d3191461f1f57520

on September 06, 2012
at 07:52 PM

I'm not really sure about "seasonal," but being a lifelong PNW'er, I guess it can go by hunting season? My butcher shop is awesome when it comes to elk, bear, venison, boar, etc.

We have farms year-round that supply buffalo, chicken, goat and cow.

Then there's the fish - that certainly has a seasonality to it.

Does that help? Only thing I can consider is following the hunting laws/guidelines since those tend to revolve around scarcity and breeding season. A lot of storing for the winter months, so fall is all about prepping and storing.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on September 06, 2012
at 10:35 PM

It does make sense that we would have eaten more meat in the winter than plants Im just curious as to what meat that would have been.=)

E36cb992cf0a5eba8b97a359c15f38b3

(4347)

on September 06, 2012
at 11:20 PM

I would say in the case of the PNW, probably mostly game and smoked/salted fish. But, if you're talking livestock (domesticated), traditionally pigs were butchered before the winter. Chickens I think most of the year, but more summer/fall. Beef I believe tends to be butchered in the fall, but I'm less sure of that one. Eggs definitely not during the winter, at least in quantity, since hens generally stop laying regularly with short days.

1
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 06, 2012
at 07:51 PM

Eggs are spring and early summer.

Lamb and beef are usually culled in the late summer or early fall.

Not sure about pigs or fowl.

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