3

votes

MCT oil and salicylate sensitivity?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 02, 2012 at 10:38 AM

Hi folks,

most people with salicylate sensitivity don't tolerate coconut oil very well. On my research about some kind of substitute, I stumbled across MCT oil, which is quite similar to coconut oil. In fact it is often made out of CO. Now I was wondering whether it has still the salicylates in it, or if they have been removed while processing.

Has anybody with salicylate sensitivity tried MCT oil with success?

Thanks! :-)

edit: bump, I guess there aren't many salicylate sufferers in here, and MCT oil is rare as well... too bad

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 05, 2012
at 04:29 PM

Very interesting, nice discovery. I don't see any way to send direct messages, no. You can send me an email if you want @ gloxinian@gmail.com

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:52 PM

I haven't tried it yet, but this one sounds promising: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12215048 I'll keep you up2date... if it works, maybe I can test some stuff for you. btw: any way to send direct messages in here?

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 04, 2012
at 04:36 PM

Wow! Never heard of that. This is very intriguing - you could experiment with everything! Are you a chemist? Seems unusual to have lying around. :) Man, if I had that at my disposal I would be testing _everything_. There are so many foods I'm unsure of. Keep me posted if you find any foods that are safe! :D

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Thanks for the Ray Peat link. Very interesting. Might explain why aspirin is one of the more effective NSAIDS for migraines.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 04, 2012
at 08:07 AM

please see my answer below

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:45 PM

I've been wondering about MCT oil myself since it is usually derived from coconut oil but refined; I haven't given it a shot yet because it's a bit prohibitively expensive to gamble on. If you try it out, let me know how it goes!

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:42 PM

Khadikar et al (1986) documented the antifungal activity of the salicylate, 5 sulphosalicylic acid. Goudard et al (1987) reported the excellent antifungal effects of the salicylate epicarine, 3 (2 hydroxy 1 naphthylmethyl) salicylic acid upon 221 pathogenic strains belonging to 23 different species which included dermatophytes, yeasts and moulds." http://www.fungalbionicbookseries.com/blue10.htm

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:42 PM

significant antifungal activity. The fact of the matter is that salicylic acid was actually classified as a germicide in the older literature. Since all of the salicylates act by virtue of their content of salicylic acid, each maintains its salicylic acid mediated antifungal activity. This singularly important mode of action of the salicylates has neither recognized nor appreciated in the pertinent current literature. The antifungal property of salicylic acid was noted by Crowdy and Davis (1952). Heng et al (1990) have reported the antifungal effects of saliclyates on Pityosporum ovale.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Regardless of salicylate's function as a plant hormone, it is bactericidal and repellant of pathogens and herbivores. "The Antifungal Activity of Salicylic Acid Phenol (carbolic acid) is the parent of salicylic acid, the active chemical structure of all of the salicylates. Salicylic acid was first synthesized and manufactured from phenol by Kolbe and Lautemann in 1860. Phenol is one of the most potent of all of the known antiseptic agents. Phenol is bactericidal at a concentration of 1% and fungicidal at a concentration above 1.3%. GG ref here. Quite predictably, salicylic acid also possess

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:12 PM

The Salicylic acid doesn't directly protect the plants it just signals genes to produce protien anti-bodies.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:11 PM

It has many functions, "Salicylic acid (SA) is a phenolic phytohormone and is found in plants with roles in plant growth and development, photosynthesis, transpiration, ion uptake and transport. SA also induces specific changes in leaf anatomy and chloroplast structure. SA is involved in endogenous signaling, mediating in plant defense against pathogens.[3] It plays a role in the resistance to pathogens by inducing the production of pathogenesis-related proteins."

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Thanks! But isn't salicylate in the skin of vegetables to protect them against hungry paleos like us? That would make it quite similar to lectins!?

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:23 PM

I dunno about salicylates and lectins being on the same level. Salicylates are rich in most fruits. Check out this article for more info on the beneficial effects of salicylate http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aspirin-brain-cancer.shtml.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:07 PM

Hi, whenever I eat olive oil, olives, coconut oil, spinach, zucchini I get severe diarrhea and spots the day after. The only connection I can think of is salicylate. Why are salicylates beneficial? (I assume that my dairy allergy has damaged my gut in such a way that salicylates do also cause trouble now, so sals might not be the original culprit... but became one) I always saw lectins and salicylates on the same level, is that wrong?

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2 Answers

3
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 02:54 PM

Refined coconut oil(which is similar to MCT oil) is pretty much free of salicylates according to Ray peat.

A little off topic but how are you sure you are sensitive to salicylates? If its from sensitivity to coconut how do you know its not another factor? Interested because salicylates seem to be so beneficial, wondering why some people seem to have sensitivity to them.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:23 PM

I dunno about salicylates and lectins being on the same level. Salicylates are rich in most fruits. Check out this article for more info on the beneficial effects of salicylate http://raypeat.com/articles/aging/aspirin-brain-cancer.shtml.

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:12 PM

The Salicylic acid doesn't directly protect the plants it just signals genes to produce protien anti-bodies.

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:07 PM

Hi, whenever I eat olive oil, olives, coconut oil, spinach, zucchini I get severe diarrhea and spots the day after. The only connection I can think of is salicylate. Why are salicylates beneficial? (I assume that my dairy allergy has damaged my gut in such a way that salicylates do also cause trouble now, so sals might not be the original culprit... but became one) I always saw lectins and salicylates on the same level, is that wrong?

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 03, 2012
at 03:29 PM

Thanks! But isn't salicylate in the skin of vegetables to protect them against hungry paleos like us? That would make it quite similar to lectins!?

Bad3a78e228c67a7513c28f17c36b3cf

(1387)

on January 04, 2012
at 01:56 PM

Thanks for the Ray Peat link. Very interesting. Might explain why aspirin is one of the more effective NSAIDS for migraines.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:42 PM

Khadikar et al (1986) documented the antifungal activity of the salicylate, 5 sulphosalicylic acid. Goudard et al (1987) reported the excellent antifungal effects of the salicylate epicarine, 3 (2 hydroxy 1 naphthylmethyl) salicylic acid upon 221 pathogenic strains belonging to 23 different species which included dermatophytes, yeasts and moulds." http://www.fungalbionicbookseries.com/blue10.htm

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on January 03, 2012
at 04:11 PM

It has many functions, "Salicylic acid (SA) is a phenolic phytohormone and is found in plants with roles in plant growth and development, photosynthesis, transpiration, ion uptake and transport. SA also induces specific changes in leaf anatomy and chloroplast structure. SA is involved in endogenous signaling, mediating in plant defense against pathogens.[3] It plays a role in the resistance to pathogens by inducing the production of pathogenesis-related proteins."

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:42 PM

significant antifungal activity. The fact of the matter is that salicylic acid was actually classified as a germicide in the older literature. Since all of the salicylates act by virtue of their content of salicylic acid, each maintains its salicylic acid mediated antifungal activity. This singularly important mode of action of the salicylates has neither recognized nor appreciated in the pertinent current literature. The antifungal property of salicylic acid was noted by Crowdy and Davis (1952). Heng et al (1990) have reported the antifungal effects of saliclyates on Pityosporum ovale.

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 03, 2012
at 05:41 PM

Regardless of salicylate's function as a plant hormone, it is bactericidal and repellant of pathogens and herbivores. "The Antifungal Activity of Salicylic Acid Phenol (carbolic acid) is the parent of salicylic acid, the active chemical structure of all of the salicylates. Salicylic acid was first synthesized and manufactured from phenol by Kolbe and Lautemann in 1860. Phenol is one of the most potent of all of the known antiseptic agents. Phenol is bactericidal at a concentration of 1% and fungicidal at a concentration above 1.3%. GG ref here. Quite predictably, salicylic acid also possess

2
E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 04, 2012
at 08:07 AM

@Shannon: I'll let you know, when I was fearless enough to try MCT oil :-)

I stumbled across an interesting fact:

It seems to be relatively easy to detect salicylates in vitro using iron(iii)-chloride. And I happen to have some iron(iii)-chloride lying at home in the garage.

So it might be possible to test the MCT oil before I let my stomach find out, whether salicylates were in it.

Best part is: You can also detect phenols and other nasty food chemicals:

mct-oil-and-salicylate-sensitivity?

Would be quite a help to have some indicator to test food with. E.g. puree a zucchini, add a few drops of iron(iii)-chloride solution and watch how it changes color. (but don't eat it afterwards, it's poisonous :D)

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 04, 2012
at 04:36 PM

Wow! Never heard of that. This is very intriguing - you could experiment with everything! Are you a chemist? Seems unusual to have lying around. :) Man, if I had that at my disposal I would be testing _everything_. There are so many foods I'm unsure of. Keep me posted if you find any foods that are safe! :D

E2b72f1912f777917d8ee6b7fba43c26

(2384)

on January 04, 2012
at 06:52 PM

I haven't tried it yet, but this one sounds promising: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12215048 I'll keep you up2date... if it works, maybe I can test some stuff for you. btw: any way to send direct messages in here?

7636e1e02ef91a46f20a42e07b565a4b

(367)

on January 05, 2012
at 04:29 PM

Very interesting, nice discovery. I don't see any way to send direct messages, no. You can send me an email if you want @ gloxinian@gmail.com

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