2

votes

Paleo friendly mayo

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 23, 2012 at 3:00 AM

Do I have to make my own Mayo or is there something that I can buy? Does anyone know about this one on Amazon?

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 23, 2012
at 07:23 PM

Welcomes! Mayo can seem so intimidating but once you get a batch or two done it's nothing but awesome going forward. Curry is a really great addition as is loads of fresh herbs, make a batch of mayo, then fold into a portion so you have options. It's seriously fun to add components as the flavour is just neutral enough that you can go balls out. Just remember that if you use olive oil it's a strong one.. that's what you'll taste. Goose is pretty neutral as is the duck. Rendered bacon fat is pretty dreamy..

A64ed062eb5e2c3407122fcf16c5de6b

(715)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:17 PM

There's a bunch of mayonnaise threads already. Bottom line, olive oil is the original recipe but may be too strong-tasting; macadamia oil makes great and safe mayonnaise (and is too expensive where I live); high oleic sunflower oil makes a somewhat acceptable neutral-tasting substitute for olive oil.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on January 23, 2012
at 07:28 AM

honey "badge"r don't give a ....

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on January 23, 2012
at 06:10 AM

Mayo is a great reason to get farm fresh eggs if you can. Studies have shown that they are far less likely to be contaminated than commercial eggs. This is not my surprised face.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on January 23, 2012
at 06:09 AM

Thank you! I love the flavor of my homemade mayo, but can never get it to thicken. Will try these tips.

737471a5bc1c8b81d968c3f3fcd13b71

(389)

on January 23, 2012
at 05:34 AM

Nice contribution, I like the tips.

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:50 AM

balor123: I've never been there either, though it was my next destination to figure out the cause of my decade long mysterious persistent coughing. (Paleo cured it). But I have access to the Mayo Embody Health website through my employer, and I search for Mayo's advice on many topics and they are unremarkably similar to conventional medical wisdom and advice. For a path blazing institution, I expected a bit more willingness to have an open mind.

4164a77c7ccf4839ec7f1e665d27cc6d

(1085)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:34 AM

Also, (please correct me if I am wrong) but assuming the eggs are pastured there should be no risk in eating a raw egg--even the whites.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:27 AM

@balor, LOL, fried eggs, baked chicken, (potato in) bone broth stew. :-))

4164a77c7ccf4839ec7f1e665d27cc6d

(1085)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Ironically, I don't like mayo and have never made it myself. I just had the recipe handy and thought I would pass it on. I'm not too worried about the raw egg, although I suppose you could leave out the egg white if you were.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:04 AM

Also, which is it - 1/4 cup or 1 cup of olive oil? It confuses me.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:01 AM

That's my problem with making it myself. It doesn't sound hard but I'm worried about making myself sick from raw egg. Also, I have no idea how long food lasts, though I guess you can make it on demand.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:00 AM

I contemplated visiting at one point but never did and going Paleo or at least gluten free seems to have stablized things so I guess I'll never know and neither will they.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:59 AM

Egg salad, chicken salad, and potato salad.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:55 AM

Craig, do you worry about the raw egg risk?

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:54 AM

LOL! I've done a few double-takes from titles too.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Mm, that does sound good. But I usually eat alone so I keep it pretty simple.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:52 AM

yeah, that's pretty much it. :-))

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:31 AM

I have a LIFE! Lol.

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on January 23, 2012
at 03:24 AM

How can someone with over 14K points not have a gold badge??? How???

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:23 AM

Mayo is the ultimate condiment! I just had some venison kebobs with carrot fries with a garlic mayo the other day, yum!

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8 Answers

9
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 23, 2012
at 04:04 AM

Make your own. You will get the perfect product hands down because you know what you're putting in there. Tinkering a bit after you've made the first batch will give you exactly what you like best in the mayosphere.

Olive oil works very well... as does duck or goose fat. Yes - my fingers did not stutter. Everyone likes the recipe from Everyday Paleo but I'm the nerd who thinks Julia Child is a genius and that's the route I go.

Nerd Alert! Julia Child???s tips for homemade mayonnaise:

Room Temperature: Have all ingredients at room temperature. If they aren???t, warm the mixing bowl in hot water to take the chill off the egg yolks; heat the oil to tepid if it is cold.

Egg Yolks: Always beat the yolks for a minute or two before adding anything to them. When they are thick and sticky, they are ready to absorb the oil. Adding The Oil: The oil must be added very slowly at first, in droplets, until the emulsion process begins and the sauce thickens into a heavy cream. Then, the oil may be incorporated more rapidly.

Proportions: The maximum amount of oil one large egg yolk can absorb is six ounces, or ?? cup. When this maximum is exceeded, the binding properties of the egg yolks break down, and the sauce thins out or curdles. If you have never made mayonnaise before, it is safest not to exceed 1/2 cup of oil per egg yolk.

Example: 2yolks + 1 to 1-1/2 cups fat + 2 to 3 tablespoons vinegar/lemon juice = 1-1/4 to 1-3/4 cups Mayo

Two recipes - one Julia and one Fannie Farmer, the FF one is a bonus blender version.

Fannie

1 egg

1/2 teaspoon dry mustard

1/2 teaspoon salt

2 tablespoons lemon juice or vinegar

1-1/2 cups olive or other oil

Put the egg, seasonings and ?? cup oil in the blender and whirl until well mixed (20 to 30 seconds).

Pour in the rest of the oil in a steady stream. Stop as soon as the emulsion is smoothly blended.

Julia

The following directions are for a hand-beaten sauce (using a wire whisk). For electric beaters, use the large bowl and the speed that you would for whipping cream. Continually push the sauce into the beater blades with a rubber scraper.

Round-bottomed, 2-1/2 to 3-quart glass or stainless steel mixing bowl. Set it on a damp towel to keep it from slipping.

3 egg yolks

Large wire whisk 1 tablespoon wine vinegar or lemon juice (more drops as needed)

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon dry or prepared mustard

1-1/2 to 2-1/4 cups of olive oil, other oil or a mixture of each. If the oil is cold, heat it to tepid; and if you are a novice, use the minimum amount

2 tablespoons boiling water

Warm the bowl in hot water; dry it. Add the egg yolks and beat for 1 to 2 minutes until they are thick and sticky.

Add the vinegar or lemon juice, salt and mustard. Beat for 30 seconds more.

The egg yolks are now ready to receive the oil. While it goes in, drop by drop, you must not stop beating until the sauce has thickened. A speed of 2 strokes per second is fast enough.

You can switch hands or switch directions, as long as you beat constantly.

Add the drops of oil with a teaspoon, or rest the lip of the bottle on the edge of the bowl. Keep your eye on the oil rather than on the sauce. Stop pouring and continue beating every 10 seconds or so, to be sure the egg yolks are absorbing the oil.

After 1/3 to 1/2 cup of oil has been incorporated, the sauce will thicken into a very heavy cream and the crisis of potential curdling is over. The beating arm may rest a moment. Then, beat in the remaining oil by 1 to 2 tablespoon dollops, blending it thoroughly after each addition.

When the sauce becomes too thick and stiff, beat in drops of vinegar or lemon juice to thin it out. Then continue with the oil.

Beat the boiling water into the sauce. This is an anti-curdling insurance. Season to taste. If the sauce is not used immediately, scrape it into a small bowl and cover it tightly so a skin will not form on its surface.

737471a5bc1c8b81d968c3f3fcd13b71

(389)

on January 23, 2012
at 05:34 AM

Nice contribution, I like the tips.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on January 23, 2012
at 06:09 AM

Thank you! I love the flavor of my homemade mayo, but can never get it to thicken. Will try these tips.

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on January 23, 2012
at 07:23 PM

Welcomes! Mayo can seem so intimidating but once you get a batch or two done it's nothing but awesome going forward. Curry is a really great addition as is loads of fresh herbs, make a batch of mayo, then fold into a portion so you have options. It's seriously fun to add components as the flavour is just neutral enough that you can go balls out. Just remember that if you use olive oil it's a strong one.. that's what you'll taste. Goose is pretty neutral as is the duck. Rendered bacon fat is pretty dreamy..

2
23f79c5241be763ac583fc68d58ee02c

on January 23, 2012
at 03:43 AM

I bet you could find some but why would you?! :) Get a Mayo recipe and replace the oil with slightly warmed bacon fat and then refrigerate. It sets up as thick as cream cheese, spreads more easily and makes GREAT veggie dip. Warm slightly and use as salad dressing with a touch of extra lemon. mmmm Baconaise!

2
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on January 23, 2012
at 03:06 AM

I'm pretty sure you have to make your own. I know. I feel your pain.

The one you linked to is not 100% olive oil. I think there's probably a drop of real olive oil in it. The rest is crap. Price is always a give-away on the quality of the oil. At that price there's no way that is edible.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:31 AM

I have a LIFE! Lol.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:52 AM

yeah, that's pretty much it. :-))

6714718e2245e5190017d643a7614157

on January 23, 2012
at 03:24 AM

How can someone with over 14K points not have a gold badge??? How???

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on January 23, 2012
at 07:28 AM

honey "badge"r don't give a ....

0
Medium avatar

(0)

on November 21, 2013
at 03:19 PM

If you have the time and patience to make your own, go for it! If you'd like to buy Paleo mayo, the only one commercially available is Payo. You can pre-order a jar on Kickstarter: http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lorensr/payo-paleo-mayo

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 23, 2012
at 11:34 AM

You absolutely should make your own. There are loads of variations on it, for example, using either raw or roasted garlic to make an Aioli, you could also make it sweet instead of savory, by using things like vanilla extract or cinnamon, or even spicy by adding a few hits of Tabasco sauce.

You could also add minced pickles and turn it into tartar sauce for wild caught fish, or even homemade ketchup for "special sauce" as used in commercial fast food for burgers (but obviously use grassfed ground beef for the burgers and no buns.)

Most recipes call for a whole egg + one egg yolk, for one cup of oil, but I find it doesn't matter if you're making it in a blender. I use two whole eggs.

Typically you'd use two room temperature eggs (put them in warm water for 5-10 minutes before using), a tablespoon of mustard, and the juice of half a lemon, some fresh ground/cracked pepper, and then 1-1.5 cups of oil. I usually use extra virgin olive oil, which does have a strong olive oil flavor, but coconut, or bacon drippings can also be used.

If you add too much oil too fast and it breaks, just throw in another egg, buzz it some more until the egg is incorporated, and continue.

As long as you're using good quality eggs, i.e. pastured, the odds of salmonella are very very low, or heat the eggs to the point that bacteria can't survive before using them.

You can also make forms of mayonnaise without actual eggs. For example, this avocado aioli recipe.

0
4164a77c7ccf4839ec7f1e665d27cc6d

(1085)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:48 AM

How about this:

Ingredients: 1 egg @ room temp 1/2 teaspoon dry mustard 1/2 teaspoon salt 2 tablespoons lemon juice @ room temp 1/4 cup plus 1 cup olive oil (light, not extra virgin) @ room temp

4164a77c7ccf4839ec7f1e665d27cc6d

(1085)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:34 AM

Also, (please correct me if I am wrong) but assuming the eggs are pastured there should be no risk in eating a raw egg--even the whites.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:01 AM

That's my problem with making it myself. It doesn't sound hard but I'm worried about making myself sick from raw egg. Also, I have no idea how long food lasts, though I guess you can make it on demand.

F5f742cc9228eb5804114d0f3be4e587

(7660)

on January 23, 2012
at 06:10 AM

Mayo is a great reason to get farm fresh eggs if you can. Studies have shown that they are far less likely to be contaminated than commercial eggs. This is not my surprised face.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:55 AM

Craig, do you worry about the raw egg risk?

4164a77c7ccf4839ec7f1e665d27cc6d

(1085)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:11 AM

Ironically, I don't like mayo and have never made it myself. I just had the recipe handy and thought I would pass it on. I'm not too worried about the raw egg, although I suppose you could leave out the egg white if you were.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:04 AM

Also, which is it - 1/4 cup or 1 cup of olive oil? It confuses me.

0
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:44 AM

Heh, and here I thought this was going to be some post saying that the Mayo clinic had somehow miraculously become Paleo-friendly. Seriously, I did!

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:00 AM

I contemplated visiting at one point but never did and going Paleo or at least gluten free seems to have stablized things so I guess I'll never know and neither will they.

D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:50 AM

balor123: I've never been there either, though it was my next destination to figure out the cause of my decade long mysterious persistent coughing. (Paleo cured it). But I have access to the Mayo Embody Health website through my employer, and I search for Mayo's advice on many topics and they are unremarkably similar to conventional medical wisdom and advice. For a path blazing institution, I expected a bit more willingness to have an open mind.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:54 AM

LOL! I've done a few double-takes from titles too.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Hi, balor! Sadly, I haven't found a retail mayo with a list of ingredients I can live with.

I now make many things at home but haven't made mayo because I know too much of it would go to waste. I'm a little surprised to report I don't think of it at all any more. I used to use quite a bit of mayo on SHAD, and I did miss it at first but now all my recipes seem to work just fine without including anything like mayo.

I most often use butter, reduced bone broth, or even a bit of home-made yogurt mixed with other things but since I don't use bread in any form I rarely find myself needing "lubricants."

If I may ask, what are you thinking you'll use mayo with?

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:59 AM

Egg salad, chicken salad, and potato salad.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:53 AM

Mm, that does sound good. But I usually eat alone so I keep it pretty simple.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 23, 2012
at 03:23 AM

Mayo is the ultimate condiment! I just had some venison kebobs with carrot fries with a garlic mayo the other day, yum!

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 23, 2012
at 04:27 AM

@balor, LOL, fried eggs, baked chicken, (potato in) bone broth stew. :-))

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