2

votes

How long does homemade mayo last?

Answered on November 13, 2014
Created February 12, 2012 at 3:49 AM

How long will homemade mayo last in the refrigerator? Organic mayo from the supermarket seems to last a while. Is there some way to tweak the recipe to last a week if it doesn't? Or can I freeze it?

463e09e6e28c4f2591aaca88bf0c3cef

(248)

on July 06, 2013
at 04:19 PM

That was a really snappy comment, Pita - you should always use your own judgment when dealing with what you choose to put in your mouth. Everyone was just kindly sharing their personal experience with homemade mayo, like you asked them to.

34f00c7b4e5738cf04ead1a012a14ed1

(996)

on March 27, 2013
at 07:27 PM

Once homemade mayo goes bad, you're going to know. If you're unsure, taste it before you put it on your food. One taste is enough to know whether or not it's still good, and also won't kill you. It's not like you'd be able to eat an entire jar of mayo before realizing that it wasn't good anymore.

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

Would any sort of cheese whey work? I'm going to make mascarpone with cream and lemon juice, and wondering if I can use some of the liquid that drains off in my mayo.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on February 17, 2012
at 06:46 PM

I would guess the bacteria introduced in the whey (I believe they whey must come from yogurt or kefir--not powdered whey) will consume the very tiny amount of sugar present in the egg, thereby making it less a good source of food for nasty bacteria that would spoil the mayo. It would also add a tiny bit of lactic acid to the acid already present in the vinegar/lemon juice used to make the mayo, and that also makes it less hospitable for nasty bacteria. I don't know this for a fact--it just seems very likely to me.

2bb436b7a789a7f26235322e5fb9bda9

(0)

on February 17, 2012
at 06:36 PM

And the science behind it is that the whey effectively lacto ferments the mayo, such as with yogurt, kiefer, pickles, etc. It is the oldest and most natural form of preservation. It also adds valuble probiotic enzymes and lypase to your product

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 15, 2012
at 08:44 PM

Freezing did not work out for me. Tried it once and had to throw it out.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 15, 2012
at 08:44 PM

I just wanted to add that according to Wellfed's Mellisa Joulwan, the mayo will last as long as the egg does. So look at your egg carton from which the egg came and write that date down on your mayo.

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:49 PM

+1 just for the visual pun.

0607529af9b78bb5b178f7ffabdc4693

(701)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:43 PM

What is the science behind this?

318374167f4c3bf3ac0f13ce48211c75

(106)

on February 12, 2012
at 02:01 PM

7 days.........

0607529af9b78bb5b178f7ffabdc4693

(701)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:45 AM

Between the pasturization and the acidity from the lemon juice, it should.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:22 AM

I read 138 - 142 for 3min? Anyway, did that. Will it last at least 1 week then?

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17 Answers

5
Da3d4a6835c0f5256b2ef829b3ba3393

on February 12, 2012
at 06:03 PM

We use eggs from a local farm. I've eaten our homemade mayo for as long as 2 weeks after it was made. I'm still standing.

Me:

how-long-does-homemade-mayo-last?

C56baa1b4f39839c018180bf63226f7d

(3499)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:49 PM

+1 just for the visual pun.

4
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on February 12, 2012
at 08:25 AM

According to Sally Fallon, in "Nourishing Traditions", if you stir a tablespoon of whey into your homemade mayonnaise, and leave it out of the fridge for about 7 hours, then refrigerate it, it will last for a couple of months.

I made some kefir and strained the whey off to do exactly this - but I find that I use the mayo within a couple of DAYS always, so I don't know if it works!

0607529af9b78bb5b178f7ffabdc4693

(701)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:43 PM

What is the science behind this?

2fd93e91bb14e641a2bac9c6033e84e2

(1614)

on February 17, 2012
at 08:09 PM

Would any sort of cheese whey work? I'm going to make mascarpone with cream and lemon juice, and wondering if I can use some of the liquid that drains off in my mayo.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on February 17, 2012
at 06:46 PM

I would guess the bacteria introduced in the whey (I believe they whey must come from yogurt or kefir--not powdered whey) will consume the very tiny amount of sugar present in the egg, thereby making it less a good source of food for nasty bacteria that would spoil the mayo. It would also add a tiny bit of lactic acid to the acid already present in the vinegar/lemon juice used to make the mayo, and that also makes it less hospitable for nasty bacteria. I don't know this for a fact--it just seems very likely to me.

3
88a3d907cfbe4cb0a23fd5da36161f9b

(614)

on February 12, 2012
at 12:27 PM

The recipe I have says 1 week past the date on the egg carton.

1
E6fb1d6762263b076d335f044bc8013f

on April 13, 2012
at 04:16 AM

I use this recipe and it has lasted me a few weeks already. http://healthyfamilychronicles.blogspot.com/2010/02/coconut-oil-mayonnaise.html

1
095ef76482234d3db444b77d7ed01c29

(2755)

on February 12, 2012
at 05:59 PM

I keep mine about three days. But I only make about a half pint at a time and that's about when I run out of it. Not risking making more and keeping it longer. Although really, eggs last much longer than this, olive oil lasts without refrigeration much longer. The dried spices I use last longer still...I don't know why I always feel 3 days is the limit. Just overly careful with food preservation I guess.

1
C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 12, 2012
at 06:18 AM

I keep mine approximately 7-8 days in an air tight container. I go by smell and visual as well.

C79a5b43dfc5749200bd9dcaa6bb0858

on February 15, 2012
at 08:44 PM

I just wanted to add that according to Wellfed's Mellisa Joulwan, the mayo will last as long as the egg does. So look at your egg carton from which the egg came and write that date down on your mayo.

1
03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

on February 12, 2012
at 04:19 AM

I've had no problem with ours lasting 10-14 days. I use pastured local eggs, which are likely fresher. But I think you'd still be fine for 5-7 days for sure.

1
0607529af9b78bb5b178f7ffabdc4693

on February 12, 2012
at 04:04 AM

You could heat the eggs in 131 degree water for five minutes before using them in the recipe, effectively pasteurizing them.

0607529af9b78bb5b178f7ffabdc4693

(701)

on February 12, 2012
at 06:45 AM

Between the pasturization and the acidity from the lemon juice, it should.

De267f213b375efca5da07890e5efc25

(3747)

on February 12, 2012
at 04:22 AM

I read 138 - 142 for 3min? Anyway, did that. Will it last at least 1 week then?

0
8b8a605bfe5e1a388936e210085fc855

on November 13, 2014
at 06:16 AM

nice post .. thank for share this informaiton !

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on November 13, 2014
at 06:14 AM

I make very small amounts at a time and try to use it up quickly.  The flavors go off after about 2 weeks.  I make mine with a stick blender--it's so easy.  To make smaller amounts I'll use smaller eggs, add a little less lemon juice and less oil.  I season with salt, bu I don't like mustard.  I never even bother tomasure any more.

 

I'm not sure I agree that they mayo will last until the "sell by" date.  When you crack the egg, you expose it to oxygen and bacteria and even more oxygen in the blending process.  This is very different than an egg safely in its shell.  

0
Medium avatar

(0)

on November 21, 2013
at 03:22 PM

Homemade mayo expires when the eggs that made it expires. Commercial mayo lasts longer because it has a low pH, its eggs are pasteurized, and it is vacuum-sealed. The only commercial Paleo mayo is Payo, and you can pre-order it on Kickstarter:

http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/lorensr/payo-paleo-mayo

0
B990b766a4edf721c2467384c073034c

on July 06, 2013
at 09:24 AM

Some of the suggestions seem strange - even dangerous to me. You can't smell or taste bacterial contamination. Sure, if decay related microbes are reproducing, you will know. But salmonella or other harmful microbes are "tasteless". This said, I can't stand this overcareful behaviour. Check, that the eggs don't have the smallest (even overgrown) cracks! This is usually the weak link for salmonella! And don't overproduce... one egg yolk at a ime seems enough. Use only clean spoons, To spoon the mayo. And keepp t after made Always refrigerated. This will give you At least 7 o 10 ays (the small Amount should even not last that long...). By the way: cooking an egg for 5 or6 inutes on 130'ish degree Fahrenheit won't pasteurize it. The temperature does't Even have time to reach most of the gg (and definitely won't reach the yolk!) 45 minutes is a time you will find on ost sous Vide tables and that looks reasonable to me... you just Need a sv rig...

0
322a67d2b4e2d562a2738291159ca412

on April 10, 2013
at 04:24 PM

All eggs sold in the US are required to be pasteurized. I'm sure there are unpasteurized eggs available on local farms or if you raise hens. That being said, home made mayo will last at least a week in the fridge. The combination of pasteurization and acids will keep it safe. But, if you prefer home made mayo, then why not just make enough for what you need? It's simple and fast to make. You don't have to make a 6-egg batch. With practice you should easily be able to get 1 cup of oil per yolk emulsified without the mayo "breaking." As much as possible, I like to use a 3 day rule for anything home-made, though. There is a difference between "good" and "fresh." If you're going to take the time to make it yourself, you should take the pleasure in eating fresh. PS, to keep it from discoloring, lay plastic wrap on the surface of the mayo in whatever container you store it in, keeping air from touching it. Just cause it's an "air tight" container doesn't mean there is no air in it! Never store in metal containers that will react to the acids. Glass is preferred. Plastic is acceptable.

Ted Olivas, Sous Chef, Tidewater Grille, Havre de Grace, MD

1eb06a4ec9173fbaf716e4c63ddcf802

on November 13, 2014
at 04:36 AM

I'm not sure where you get your information but according to the usda eggs are not required to be pasteurized in the United states. You can purchase pasteurized eggs but they cost more and are labeled appropriately.

0
Ed7403e397077dd1acdbf25c7f6e56ce

on March 27, 2013
at 07:41 PM

You're making it yourself, so understand that a lot of Food Service regulations aren't going to apply.

You're not going to give yourself strep throat, the flu, or hepatitis.

You really only need to worry about Salmonella, which can get you at day 1 if the egg is infected. Keeping it cold enough to not allow bacterial growth will matter.

Aside from that, you'll know when eggs spoil.

Also, you can contact your local Health Department for a schedule of their free Food Safety Seminar. I've been to a few, never felt it was wasted time.

0
A9686e574c9fd2d21bd70a4a16a38b61

on January 22, 2013
at 03:19 PM

I got my own chickens, use the most fresh eggs and always eat it for several weeks...I use it in stead of butter on my bread.I never got sick. I am not the only who does it like that here, my neighbours do too. I do put garlic and other herbs in it, maybe that helps me survive.. :) I think a fresh egg can be kept pretty well conserved in the oil and vinegar.

0
2bb436b7a789a7f26235322e5fb9bda9

(0)

on February 17, 2012
at 06:35 PM

I've had my first batch, with whey as nourishing tradtions mentions, for about 2 months (I forgot about it and don't use much mayo) it smells and tastes fin and the eggsalad I made my boyfriend didn't kill him :)

2bb436b7a789a7f26235322e5fb9bda9

(0)

on February 17, 2012
at 06:36 PM

And the science behind it is that the whey effectively lacto ferments the mayo, such as with yogurt, kiefer, pickles, etc. It is the oldest and most natural form of preservation. It also adds valuble probiotic enzymes and lypase to your product

-1
3ce4b1e919d5a3d64a77fd8e9d10c680

(-2)

on March 27, 2013
at 07:09 PM

So, really no one has a clue. These answers are all over the map. Thanks for nothing, I'll use my own judgement.

34f00c7b4e5738cf04ead1a012a14ed1

(996)

on March 27, 2013
at 07:27 PM

Once homemade mayo goes bad, you're going to know. If you're unsure, taste it before you put it on your food. One taste is enough to know whether or not it's still good, and also won't kill you. It's not like you'd be able to eat an entire jar of mayo before realizing that it wasn't good anymore.

463e09e6e28c4f2591aaca88bf0c3cef

(248)

on July 06, 2013
at 04:19 PM

That was a really snappy comment, Pita - you should always use your own judgment when dealing with what you choose to put in your mouth. Everyone was just kindly sharing their personal experience with homemade mayo, like you asked them to.

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