1

votes

Advice for mitigating the affects of ultrarunning

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 14, 2011 at 11:24 AM

Hi

I'm new-paleo, training for an utramarathon, which I know is distinctly non-paleo, and I wondered what you would advise in terms of fuelling training, race nutrition, and eating to combat the deliterous effects of doing something so stupid.

Many thanks

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 13, 2012
at 11:15 PM

I just completed a 100 mile race in the mountains with a longest run of 26 miles and about a half dozen 4-6 hour runs, one or two per weekend. During the week, some weights, and 1-2 Tabata sessions. I have a history of long running but this is the lightest load I've done in 10 years. It is doable but hard.

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 10, 2012
at 09:10 PM

Thanks, Todd - I am having a hard time finding paleo-ish folks who do 100s and keep on truckin'. A few of the athletes (like Jay Jack on Robb Wolf's page who did a 50K in 8 hours) just do it once and are then done. Are you still training and "racing" the 100s?

1aa42ad69e7a5ea23d748879e0b533d7

(28)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:13 AM

can you specify the herbs ?

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:08 AM

Here is an article. The author advises "therapeutic amounts of testosterone" as the best case scenario. http://www.slowtwitch.com/Features/Mark_Sisson_says_training_is_no_guarantee_of_health._4.html

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:06 AM

Mark Sisson would advise therapeutic amounts of testosterone.

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 15, 2011
at 05:02 AM

That would be my assumption as well, Angela. I now view that assumption as misguided. I loved running ultras but I now realize all that distance, for training, wasn't necessary. Probably counterproductive, on race day. Do less distance in training. Get more strength work done. Race day, run long and well. http://www.gotrimax.com/TriMaxBmac.htm

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 14, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Not when you're running a 100 mile race

7a784cb9310e26e4cb8416f3c8fd092c

(121)

on November 14, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Ever hear of "Beginners' Luck"?

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on November 14, 2011
at 07:14 PM

Run in reverse ASAP

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 14, 2011
at 05:40 PM

Become a sprinter instead...seriously.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on November 14, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Sit on the couch immediately!

  • 4359ded83fc58bdcf7f825a49d4e2bc8

    asked by

    (80)
  • Views
    2.9K
  • Last Activity
    1574D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

10 Answers

best answer

1
451114d9ae1e0f9e1a028cce5538e790

(226)

on November 14, 2011
at 07:08 PM

Research shows that sprint interval training can increase endurance capacity, so it can benefit your ultramarathon performance while minimizing inflammation, oxidative stress, and cardiovascular damage. I'd use more SIT than long, steady efforts in training for these reasons.

5
Medium avatar

on November 14, 2011
at 05:28 PM

Whatever else ultra running is about, optimal fitness isn't part of the mix. I say this as a former ultra runner who decided to face facts about the costs in terms of inflammation and oxidation. Look, if the euphoria of training for and finishing such events is your preferred source for inner/spiritual satisfaction (I can dig) then you can do your best to mitigate the damage with diet and supplements. Check out Hammer Nutrition. I have zero regrets about moving beyond ultra range and focusing on fitness oriented, longevity-favoring cardio and strength training. Plus, it was only after quitting that I realize how tiring it was to train at that level. Some of the least healthy (overweight, carb-loading, edgy, fidgety, exhausted) people I know, run 4-5 ultra events per year.

It is now clear to me how much beet I feel not consuming the quantities of carbs required for ultra training. Even low sugar carbs took their toll, in terms of a certain constant "amping up" that just didn't work. I am pretty sure getting off wheat has made a big difference in that regard. I definitely feel better, run better, and enjoy life more, when not constantly "fueling" for events I had stopped enjoying and that weren't serving my larger goals of extending healthy longevity. I still seek and enjoy peak experiences associated with physical exertion and other similar challenges.

3
954677d5c79932d754d97048191b08c0

on November 14, 2011
at 12:12 PM

Also one great about paleo and ultras, is minimal inflammation! I can run 50 miles and not even feel it the next day. Or as I said I jus did JJ100 and am walking and even jogging the day after, no pain. Important to keep paleo after the run too, and hydrate

3
954677d5c79932d754d97048191b08c0

on November 14, 2011
at 12:09 PM

Everyone is different, I tested many things on runs before hand. Which distance are you doing? Many people don't stay strict paleo during ultras, but I do. I just did Javelina Jundred 100 miler strictly on paleo fueling. Dates, bananas, oranges, coconut water, nuts, plums all do well for me. Many raw items at whole foods work. Go raw bars, lara bars, laughing giraffe balls, ect. Paleo diet for Athletes is an amazing book to read. If you want to keep gels with your fueling, HAMMER is most natural and won't put you in a spiral like some high sugar things would.

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 10, 2012
at 09:10 PM

Thanks, Todd - I am having a hard time finding paleo-ish folks who do 100s and keep on truckin'. A few of the athletes (like Jay Jack on Robb Wolf's page who did a 50K in 8 hours) just do it once and are then done. Are you still training and "racing" the 100s?

2
7a784cb9310e26e4cb8416f3c8fd092c

(121)

on November 14, 2011
at 07:58 PM

I'm a marathoner & ultra-runner. There are at least two different brands of Almond Butter that are now available in 2 oz packets - perfect replacement for gel. The brands are Justin's and Artisana.

1
B9cc28905ec54389c47cde031d709703

on November 14, 2011
at 10:11 PM

For day-to-day training: potato, plantain, banana, and orange juice have all worked very well for me. I would say supplemental Vitamin C is important as well as magnesium if not for performance for recovery.

1
A1a0baccef58499acf9ceb3c874997f2

on November 14, 2011
at 05:07 PM

I think the comment about inflammation is key. (I used to be a runner. Lots of injuries and felt tired all the time.) Be ultra aware of how you're feeling, in your joints, your appetite, even your skin, etc. Ice, stretch, drink ridiculous amounts of water and continue to build strength, if you already were. Magnesium is great. Also, you can eat cherries, fresh or dried, or drink the juice, which helps with inflammation. You could start using some herbs that nourish the adrenals, so that you're working with any damage you might do daily. Happy trails.

1aa42ad69e7a5ea23d748879e0b533d7

(28)

on May 29, 2012
at 02:13 AM

can you specify the herbs ?

1
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 14, 2011
at 02:13 PM

I'd check out crossfitendurance if you haven't already. The guy who started it told me he'd done an ultramarathon without training any distances longer than 15-20 miles.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 14, 2011
at 08:10 PM

Not when you're running a 100 mile race

Medium avatar

(8239)

on November 15, 2011
at 05:02 AM

That would be my assumption as well, Angela. I now view that assumption as misguided. I loved running ultras but I now realize all that distance, for training, wasn't necessary. Probably counterproductive, on race day. Do less distance in training. Get more strength work done. Race day, run long and well. http://www.gotrimax.com/TriMaxBmac.htm

7a784cb9310e26e4cb8416f3c8fd092c

(121)

on November 14, 2011
at 07:56 PM

Ever hear of "Beginners' Luck"?

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on September 13, 2012
at 11:15 PM

I just completed a 100 mile race in the mountains with a longest run of 26 miles and about a half dozen 4-6 hour runs, one or two per weekend. During the week, some weights, and 1-2 Tabata sessions. I have a history of long running but this is the lightest load I've done in 10 years. It is doable but hard.

1
E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 14, 2011
at 01:12 PM

Make sure to get enough carbs before, during and after running preferably from fruit, honey or simple sugars.

0
4a9262afcff3cbb50446adb8def6b3e1

on May 29, 2012
at 01:42 AM

Hey man, not sure if you're still interested in this subject - but check out Phil Maffetone (.com). He's an Endurance legend who has trained the likes of Ultra Runner Stu Mittleman, Mark Allen & Mike Pigg (triathletes), as well as formula one drivers and stealth bomber pilots. He's all about connecting fitness with health and argues that this is entirely possible with an appropriate approach to training and health. his book the Big Book of Training and Endurance is a tome of goodness. While he's not strictly paleo, he's pretty paleo-friendly and with some slight alterations and an "Experiment of One" you'll be fine. I ran two 100km Trail Ultra's this month, within 2 weeks of each other and got faster. I'm doing a 50km this weekend.

Let me know if you want more info.

Cheers Tegyn

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!