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Recommendations for Mandoline

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 15, 2012 at 1:38 PM

Years ago, I bought a mandoline for about $10 and it works, but only has two settings, thick and thicker, which is achieved by flipping the plate over.

I am looking to purchase a new one and know that I will have to shell out around $100 (at least) to get something good. Does anyone have any recommendations? Do you have a mandoline that you wouldn't trade for the world? I would prefer something that isn't mostly plastic.

Thanks!

4517f03b8a94fa57ed57ab60ab694b7d

on February 16, 2013
at 09:02 PM

I hope your fucking obese gut harbors maggots. Been feeling a tingling sensation around your midsection lately? ...SUCCESS!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 16, 2012
at 05:55 PM

Welcome! I try to find the sense of humour of things, no matter how mucked up they are, and the bandage was so big, called it the sleeping bag, that I had some fun with it http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxlq5fO2qy1qmeyw2o1_1280.png what was bigger my thumb and: Empire State Building, towed gnome, wheel of cheese, the #4 train :)

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 08:39 PM

I already have one...cheese graters are even dangerous for me. =)

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 07:35 PM

Don't forget your cut resistent gloves (http://amzn.com/B0008F5JFI)! They're fantastic for these tools, and they render the food guides unnecessary.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Kevlar cut-resistant gloves have solved this for me. They're way more comfortable and convenient than the food holder.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 05:13 PM

LOL...I just realized I spelled it wrong.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 15, 2012
at 04:37 PM

Have you considered the ukelele?

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Reading that made my knees hurt. (For some reason, when I "feel" someone else's pain, that's what aches.) Thanks for the input!

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on June 15, 2012
at 03:32 PM

A chef friend has one of these and says she uses it a lot more often and likes it better than the fancy professional French mandoline at her restaurant.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Yes, I am all too familiar with this scenario.

7caec21ad66b572d9afcb1e24f7297aa

(257)

on June 15, 2012
at 02:12 PM

"Whatever you do, I would buy a brand that allows you to purchase replacement blades for a reasonable price." YES, YES, YES!

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6 Answers

3
B4b56fcc5ebad76ed8e1709dedf01f86

on June 15, 2012
at 02:00 PM

My mandoline is a 'Joyce Chen Asian Mandoline Plus'. It's just a rebranded Benriner, which is a very basic mandoline, but it has lasted me 6 years (I replaced the blades last year). Although it's a cheaper model ($70?), I think it's pretty good for a modern kitchen item (considering I'm on my third food processor in 3 years. Grrr).

I will say, it's not the safest mandoline in the world, but you either know how to use a mandoline or you don't. The blades (and the julienne-ing implements in particular) on a mandolin are going to dull with use whether you spend $50 or $200 on the product, and that's when it stops being as useful.

Whatever you do, I would buy a brand that allows you to purchase replacement blades for a reasonable price.

7caec21ad66b572d9afcb1e24f7297aa

(257)

on June 15, 2012
at 02:12 PM

"Whatever you do, I would buy a brand that allows you to purchase replacement blades for a reasonable price." YES, YES, YES!

1
1e8b0544791fa695c718834e7a040642

(388)

on June 15, 2012
at 04:36 PM

I love my OXO.

1
7e1433afbb06c318c4d90860d493c49d

(5959)

on June 15, 2012
at 04:16 PM

I have three mandolines: a Moha-Swiss, a Matfer, and a Kyocera julienne. The Moha-Swiss is the one I use most frequently because it is so simple to use. The Matfer is a more professional grade, and I use it when I need the infinitely adjustable thickness feature. The Kyocera is a poorly performing piece of junk that sits in the drawer, taking up space.

1
Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 15, 2012
at 04:00 PM

I have a few of the paddle style/ceramic blade from Kyocera, pretty great and cheap. My metal blade mandoline is a Benriner. Sharp as hell, kickass price.

The basic blade that is fixed permanently in the Benriner does much of what you would want a mandoline to do: slice hard vegetables into paper-thin slices. But you can also insert a second blade to make thin strips or beautifully shaped thin slices of zucchini, carrot, broccoli, and more. The screws on the back let you tighten in or remove the secondary blades. They come with three blades. The back can also be tilted slightly to adjust for thinner or thicker slices from the main blade.

Note: The blades are made of carbon steel; they should keep their edge for a long time just be sure they are washed and carefully dried. They will rust if not dried thoroughly.

Note 2: I took the entire side tip of my thumb off, took months to heal, it's still regenerating but I'll always have a divit, and the empty spot feels weird and hurts sometimes. My Dr. literally smacked my leg when she saw it a few days later as, apparently, stitches can be formed to make a "flap" of skin. Between 30-40 is what would have been used on me. Oh god.. my apartment looked like a freaking crime scene. Anyway, PLEASE use the guard or get a glove. I still use my mandolines, almost daily, but every time now I feel a little sick to my stomach and get a bit of a cold sweat going.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 04:34 PM

Reading that made my knees hurt. (For some reason, when I "feel" someone else's pain, that's what aches.) Thanks for the input!

Ce7e28769d92d5de5533e775b1de966e

on June 16, 2012
at 05:55 PM

Welcome! I try to find the sense of humour of things, no matter how mucked up they are, and the bandage was so big, called it the sleeping bag, that I had some fun with it http://25.media.tumblr.com/tumblr_lxlq5fO2qy1qmeyw2o1_1280.png what was bigger my thumb and: Empire State Building, towed gnome, wheel of cheese, the #4 train :)

1
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on June 15, 2012
at 02:54 PM

I've got a Kyocera CSN-202, it has a ceramic blade with 4 settings. It has not dulled in 2 years of constant use. The blade is not replaceable, and it is mostly plastic. It is a snap to clean, and one of the best Christmas gifts I have ever recieved. Highly reccomended, about $25 on amazon or a local kitchen store. If I had to take 5 kitchen tools to a desert isle, this would make the cut.

724f0f45eb53919b8c617c3c1ec5fbc5

(830)

on June 15, 2012
at 03:32 PM

A chef friend has one of these and says she uses it a lot more often and likes it better than the fancy professional French mandoline at her restaurant.

1
877ded1787562057ee2e1a4548b6050a

on June 15, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Also, my recommendation is to use it as designed. That thing can slice your fingertips off if you are not careful. Trust me, I know from experience.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on June 15, 2012
at 02:46 PM

Yes, I am all too familiar with this scenario.

A4216f1b1e1f5ab3815bd91700905081

(1646)

on June 15, 2012
at 07:34 PM

Kevlar cut-resistant gloves have solved this for me. They're way more comfortable and convenient than the food holder.

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