1

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Source of magnesium which doesnt cause vivid dreams?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 30, 2011 at 8:21 PM

Natural Calm causes me very vivid dreams and whenever this occurs (80% of the time) I dont feel well rested the next day. Im only taking 1/4 teaspoon.

Does anyone have a recommendations for alternative sources? Ive taken some other versions of mag before but dont remember the source.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Nah, I'm just a guy with a boring job who reads (slightly less boring) scientific papers all day long.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:25 AM

Well natural calm says right on the bottle to drink it more than once per day. Ido it at lunch and dinner. Doesn't induce sleep but improves it totally.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:24 AM

Last winter I was doing an Epsom bath 3-4 x week. Awesome stuff.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:10 AM

FED~ I edited above to give proper credit to Happy Now. I sure wish I liked baths more...

2d4ff23c8ce7fb00708fa88ceffd4087

(408)

on October 01, 2011
at 12:35 AM

NVM I just saw you state that you didn't feel well rested the next day.

2d4ff23c8ce7fb00708fa88ceffd4087

(408)

on October 01, 2011
at 12:34 AM

Why wouldn't you want vivid dreams? Dreaming makes sleep not feel like a complete waste of time.

7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on September 30, 2011
at 11:16 PM

1/4 tsp does this for you? Wow.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:27 PM

Nah, I'm just a guy with a boring job who reads scientific papers all day long.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I could try magnesium glycinate during the day but I tried Natural Calm during the day before and it made me very lethargic. BTW Travis, are you a natural health practitioner? You consistently give some of the best answers on paleohacks.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:01 PM

That is the form I use most often, and no crazy dreams yet. Epsom Salt baths and foot soaks work well too.

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4 Answers

3
Medium avatar

on September 30, 2011
at 08:53 PM

Magnesium glycinate is generally well-tolerated and I at least haven't experienced any vivid dreams, out-of-body experiences, Casper attacks etc.

One thing about magnesium that I don't understand is why it's taken at night like a pharmacological sleep-aid. Shouldn't people be taking it to address a magnesium deficiency, the result of which should be a calmer state than if one were deficient? It seems like a better idea to take it in a way that doesn't interfere with the nutrient absorption from other foods first and foremost, though I suppose right before bed could satisfy that requirement.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

Nah, I'm just a guy with a boring job who reads (slightly less boring) scientific papers all day long.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:25 AM

Well natural calm says right on the bottle to drink it more than once per day. Ido it at lunch and dinner. Doesn't induce sleep but improves it totally.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:27 PM

Nah, I'm just a guy with a boring job who reads scientific papers all day long.

B22e5946e28a1845a6006737e59edfc6

(2437)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:03 PM

I could try magnesium glycinate during the day but I tried Natural Calm during the day before and it made me very lethargic. BTW Travis, are you a natural health practitioner? You consistently give some of the best answers on paleohacks.

1
Medium avatar

(19469)

on October 01, 2011
at 12:05 AM

Happy Now mentioned it, but I want to emphasize epsom salt (magnesium sulfate) baths.

This will raise plasma concentrations of magnesium and is also a nice way to relax after a tough day/workout/etc.

http://george-eby-research.com/html/absorption_of_magnesium_sulfate.pdf

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:24 AM

Last winter I was doing an Epsom bath 3-4 x week. Awesome stuff.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on October 01, 2011
at 02:10 AM

FED~ I edited above to give proper credit to Happy Now. I sure wish I liked baths more...

1
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on September 30, 2011
at 08:37 PM

Have you tried topical Magnesium oil?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on September 30, 2011
at 09:01 PM

That is the form I use most often, and no crazy dreams yet. Epsom Salt baths and foot soaks work well too.

0
Medium avatar

on December 03, 2013
at 11:01 PM

Okay Geoff admittedly I cheated, I just copied my earlier answer from elsewhere in the forum.

The pineal gland, located roughly in the center of the head, depends upon magnesium for its own production of melatonin. So a body that is quite deficient typically will produce and secrete less of this hormone, which in turn can negatively impact a person’s ability to switch off at night and fall asleep. Essentially one can only bake as much cake as one has flour for. Of course the optic nerve, being connected to the pineal gland, signals the pineal gland to start producing melatonin once the sun goes down, also known as DLMO (dim light melatonin onset). A lack of light received by the retina permits this melatonin production, conversely light, particularly blue light, suppresses its production. This explains the use of “blue blocking” glasses in the later hours of the day or blackout curtains by those who have difficulty falling asleep.

Similar to a child waiting all year long for his parents to finally afford his expensive tastes in Lego, the pineal gland can be chomping-at-the-bit (eager) to produce melatonin, but lacking the magnesium, as one of the essential building blocks, to do so. As if by a stroke of luck the pineal glands owner has finally caught on to a potential magnesium deficiency and eagerly scoffs down (Brit. devour greedily) handfuls of the stuff (usually too much) and low and behold copious amounts of melatonin are rapidly produced.

Now vivid dreams primarily occur during what is considered the most important and lighter phase of sleep, closer to the morning, known as REM sleep (rapid eye movement). REM sleep is a normal part of a human’s daily sleep pattern and usually accounts for 1-2 hours of sleep a night, although occupies a majority of a new born babies sleep. And you guessed it, the hormone melatonin has been directly shown to increase REM sleep. So essentially magnesium allows for the production of melatonin and more melatonin equals more REM sleep and more REM sleep equals vivid dreams. Don’t want vivid dreams (well who does?) moderate ones magnesium intake, spread it out throughout the day. Don't take it all at once, don't take it just before bed, it is not a drug and is not time sensitive like a drug. Put it in a bottle of water and sip it throughout the day just like the body is used to getting its magnesium i.e. 3 meals a day. If this does not sort itself out reduce the amount one is taking.

Magnesium the mineral itself is identical between all the different forms, so changing the form technically shouldn't change this circumstance, unless of course one uses a less absorbable form. The less absorbable the form, the less is actually utilized by the endocrine system and the more that goes directly to the bowels.

Also transdermal magnesium such as magnesium rubs or "oils" (typically magnesium chloride) are a great idea as @Dragonfly suggests, as are magnesium sulfate baths as @FED at LiveCaveman.com suggests. In both cases less magnesium typically makes it into the blood stream and thus a reduced impact on the pineal gland (and other aspects of the body).

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