2

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Sea vegetables - are they part of our ancestral diet?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 12, 2011 at 1:49 PM

I have been using FitDay on and off for about 2 years now and find that I am regularly low in some minerals - potassium, magnesium and calcium to name a few. I've started adding nori, wakame etc to my diet and find in this site

http://www.sacfoodcoop.com/PDFs/seaveggies.pdf

that they are high in the minerals that my diet is lacking.

Which made me wonder, if our ancestors spent much of their time near the coast, eating fish, shellfish etc, would they have included a significant amounts of sea vegetables - enough to have made us evolve to require the minerals found in them?

Would adding seaweeds to compost heaps etc increase the amount of these minerals to depleted soils? Were they historically used as fertiliser?

Of course, Fit`Day doesn't seem to have a listing for Nori, for example, so I can't track if it is adding much to my lacking nutrients but I am sure that it is.

Any views on this?

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 13, 2011
at 10:28 AM

Do they really? So sea water might of benefit too - except of course, all that salt...

B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on November 12, 2011
at 02:27 PM

It's when I look at the nutritional profile of all those seaweeds that I understand why so many of us supplement. Those vegetables are vitamin/mineral-bombs.

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3 Answers

1
8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on November 12, 2011
at 04:40 PM

Seaweed is used extensively to build soil on rocky coastal areas. Without the seaweed additions, virtually nothing would grow. Soils built upon mostly seaweed aren't necessarily that high in minerals, since they are usually also near areas with constant or heavy rainfall, so the salt and other minerals are leached out pretty rapidly.

0
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on November 12, 2011
at 06:20 PM

I echo what Korion said above.

When you consider that we populated all continents and islands, I have to believe people in coastal areas took full advantage of sea animals and plants. Especially during the last icy times.

After all, our cells have the same chemical profile as sea water, don't they?

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on November 13, 2011
at 10:28 AM

Do they really? So sea water might of benefit too - except of course, all that salt...

0
D12142c8cafb16d9af10b3362cb8fb62

(1590)

on November 12, 2011
at 02:59 PM

Magnesium is lacking pretty much everywhere due to modern farming methods and water treatment. Pretty sure it's safe to say back then, water plus foods eaten would have provided enough.

Tubers generally have an excellent nutritional profile for things many are lacking in such as potassium.

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