2

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Magnesium sulfate drip too extreme of a measure to take to correct deficiency?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 08, 2011 at 12:00 AM

I got to experience the "joys" of this firsthand when I started to develop pre-eclampsia during labor. IV Magnesium is unpleasant, but in the the first 6 months postpartum my health was better than it had been...ever, and I'm wondering if it that may have had something to do with the 3 days of being hooked up to the magnesium drip. I haven't even floated this idea by my naturopath, but do people do this for non-emergency reasons? Is it a crazy person idea, or a fast-lane solution to improving health?

I'm trying to get a little magnesium here and there (magnesium oil when I remember a couple times per week under my arms, Celtic Sea salt to taste, bone broth a few times/week, about 50mg ionic magnesium drops in my water every few days (more gives me heartburn), Epsom Salt foot soaks once a week, eating nori a few times/week, Vitamineral Green a few times/week, and the occasional dose of CalMag Citrate). So maybe I'm getting enough randomly, but I doubt it. I want to get my levels up before adding more vitamin D for the winter months, which can supposedly drive magnesium levels down.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 08, 2011
at 01:30 AM

I'm planning on asking about getting levels checked next time I get a check-up. Wouldn't want to go that route blind, and I can't imagine any doctor would even go there without labs anyway. I've suspected that I either don't have enough, or can't hold onto a enough (i.e. magnesium wasting) because I still have PCOS symptoms that have slowly increased as time has passed between when I had the mag. drip and now.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 08, 2011
at 12:54 AM

Squeak, squeak! Scrubbing the tub so I can take a bath is probably more pleasant than getting holes poked in my body and enduring that "liquid lava" feel of the mag. drip. Just takes months instead of hours to get to the same level.

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4 Answers

4
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on October 08, 2011
at 12:49 AM

I hear that taking baths with epsom salts is a pretty good way to get magnesium and sulfur. Don't forget your rubber ducky!

Honestly, I think you're over-thinking this. Just get some in your mouth and in your skin and test every once in a while.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 08, 2011
at 12:54 AM

Squeak, squeak! Scrubbing the tub so I can take a bath is probably more pleasant than getting holes poked in my body and enduring that "liquid lava" feel of the mag. drip. Just takes months instead of hours to get to the same level.

2
Bece6312a7d51fc6a98a49bd62cf3152

on October 08, 2011
at 01:15 AM

In the hospital setting, a normal magnesium range is considered 1.8-2.3 mg/dL (very narrow). If a patient is at high risk for cardiac arrhythmias, IV magnesium will be used for replacement to keep a level above 2.

With less of a risk, magnesium oxide 400mg is sometimes used as a pill once to three times a day to keep levels "ideal" (above 2 mg/dL).

For you, I would say dietary sources should be enough. Looking at blood lab values as part of my daily job, I get the feeling the body does a good job maintaining a normal magnesium level provided sufficient intake (and these are people on a hospital style SAD diet). Magnesium levels usually stay pretty stable even in patients without daily replacement. If you're still worried, take a magnesium supplement and follow up with blood tests.

IV magnesium replacement is definitely necessary for pre-eclampsia and other emergency conditions like torsades de pointes but not necessary on a regular basis to keep your magnesium levels "normal" on a day to day basis. Besides, I don't know where you could even obtain IV magnesium replacement outside the hospital setting.

The real question is whether or not the western medicine's "normal" range of 1.8-2.3 is truly best for humans and whether our ancestors had higher levels than this on average.

1
E46d4f7e35e46ee4e8211ab4bc852023

(1510)

on October 08, 2011
at 01:12 AM

I used to do magnesium drips weekly, for a period of about three months, along with Vit C. I got them at my doctor's office, and the whole thing would take about an hour. I can't confirm that it was magnesium sulfate per se. Anyway, I thought that it was totally fine and not drastic at all. I think getting magnesium shots would be much more drastic, as they're known to be incredibly painful. If you know it works for you, I don't see what's wrong with it.

It might be a good idea to have your magnesium levels tested first, so that you can confirm that you're not getting or absorbing enough in all these other ways you're trying to get it in.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 08, 2011
at 01:30 AM

I'm planning on asking about getting levels checked next time I get a check-up. Wouldn't want to go that route blind, and I can't imagine any doctor would even go there without labs anyway. I've suspected that I either don't have enough, or can't hold onto a enough (i.e. magnesium wasting) because I still have PCOS symptoms that have slowly increased as time has passed between when I had the mag. drip and now.

0
8cfb87848eaf3f63af60996b6d581973

on May 27, 2012
at 07:38 PM

you were probably given magnesium sulfate to stop seizures from forming and damaging your unborn baby and your brain- that is the danger with preeclampsia- the precursor to eclampsia, not so much the high blood pressure but the other physiological processes that are more emergent, and mangesium sulfate is given for that reason. Some doctors may also give it if your baby is premature to try and delay labor if you are before 34 weeks. This is old school though and doesn't actually work.

My question would be- did you have high bp throughout your pregnancy, or just during labor? Do you ahve high bp now? and did you change your eating and exercize habits when you were pregnant? My guess is if you started living healthier for your baby, this is why you feel healthy now. Not the mag. sulphate.

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