3

votes

Feed a brown bag, 51 yo male for one week, on tight budget

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 30, 2012 at 7:41 PM

Trying to drop the everyday a sandwich thing with my husband. There is no microwave for heating leftovers available. Job is physical, he eats breakfast at 5AM and often has late days, so he needs food that will get him through. We are on a very tight budget (and I'll be off my teaching job all summer so we'll be squeezed more) Trying to have good breakfasts and evening meals. Suggestions?

6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

(633)

on April 03, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Stanley makes a kick ass 'thermos'.

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on April 01, 2012
at 03:10 PM

the pancakes are made of almond and coconut flour and the jelly should be made without added sugar.I don't understand what's not paleo about it.It's just something different than meat and veggies.We all need variety.Plus it's delicious

99cd0e1e506a609c6be008d6ba3c548a

(0)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:35 PM

not so paleo...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:49 PM

Yes, a flask is great. I have a stainless steel, large necked food flask that I take every day. The wife makes stock from bones and meat scraps and puts this and a mixture of cooked meats in the flask. I also take some lard which I add to the food at work.

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:09 PM

Check out Mr. Bento. Several different configurations available -containers for a hot main dish, rice and soup. Stainless steel, made in Japan and keeps food very hot. Not cheap, but about the same as a week of lunches out.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 30, 2012
at 09:07 PM

Do yourself a favour: do not buy the Thermos brand thermos with a 2 part detachable lid, where the top lid contains a cute folding spoon. The problem with this Thermos is that the 2 lids twist off in different directions, the the metal threads sometimes don't line up. The heat / temperature change causes the seal to change a bit, and then it is damn near impossible to unscrew.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 30, 2012
at 08:27 PM

yes, a thermos!!! how could i forget?! PERFECT.

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10 Answers

best answer

1
85178e006119b00322a2401c494dd3a4

on March 30, 2012
at 07:48 PM

Big salad with lots of protein and fats: sliced up steak or chicken, hard boiled egg, avocado. Hard boiled eggs on their own are also good - you can boil up a whole bunch ahead of time.

best answer

2
6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

on March 30, 2012
at 07:50 PM

Sounds like my job. I pack yams drowning in butter in Tupperware, a thermos of kefir, quesidillas in Tupperware, coconut milk w/ carob in a thermos, salami, apples, carrots, a jar of kimchee, cubed raw cheese, yogurt. Also, I usually eat what ever leftovers there are from the previous night's dinner, so make extra.

I'm getting hungry.

best answer

2
65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 30, 2012
at 07:52 PM

pulled pork or brisket is delicious cold - you could buy an inexpensive cut of meat, slow cook it, and pack that for him. Add a salad, or some sliced veggies, hardboiled eggs, nuts, etc. Avocadoes are great, but sometimes they are on the expensive side.

Something I personally love is harboiled eggs mashed with olive oil, some curry powder, salt and pepper. (fresh herbs if you've got them or like them). Pack this with sliced red/green peppers, cucumbers or any other veggie he likes and you've got a delicious and filling "Spread".

best answer

7
07c86972a3bea0b0dc17752e9d2f5642

on March 30, 2012
at 08:25 PM

Think about what wives used to send their husbands to work with before microwaves and convenience food. I would invest in a good thermos (they are expensive, but a good one will last for years and do better at keeping your food hot) and fill it up with a hearty stew or chilli with lots of meat and root vegetables (potatoes, carrots, etc.) and made with bone broth and cooked with a good amount of animal fat. Then add a couple hard boiled eggs, and a piece or two of fruit.

65bf1ca7071028018c6d8305d0ddcd76

(3049)

on March 30, 2012
at 09:07 PM

Do yourself a favour: do not buy the Thermos brand thermos with a 2 part detachable lid, where the top lid contains a cute folding spoon. The problem with this Thermos is that the 2 lids twist off in different directions, the the metal threads sometimes don't line up. The heat / temperature change causes the seal to change a bit, and then it is damn near impossible to unscrew.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on March 30, 2012
at 08:27 PM

yes, a thermos!!! how could i forget?! PERFECT.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:49 PM

Yes, a flask is great. I have a stainless steel, large necked food flask that I take every day. The wife makes stock from bones and meat scraps and puts this and a mixture of cooked meats in the flask. I also take some lard which I add to the food at work.

Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:09 PM

Check out Mr. Bento. Several different configurations available -containers for a hot main dish, rice and soup. Stainless steel, made in Japan and keeps food very hot. Not cheap, but about the same as a week of lunches out.

6b6c938c368e7a135e74c468c9ed1189

(633)

on April 03, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Stanley makes a kick ass 'thermos'.

best answer

3
78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

on March 30, 2012
at 08:04 PM

Maybe you can pack an ice pack in an insulated reusable bag. It's not ideal but it does make things last a little longer. You've got awesome suggestions already. How does he feel about eating leftovers cold? I wouldn't mind, but I'm not sure about him.

I'm not sure where you live, but I'm from the US. I only spend around $32 on meat/protein a week (though it's probably less than his needs since I'm probably smaller as I'm a female), and then try to budget $20-25 for various produce (usually this lasts longer than a week) and maybe $6-8 (?) on various forms of fat in the form of coconut oil, avocado, or nuts/seeds (I don't go through it in a week so I'm guessing).

Eggs are a great, fairly cheap option. Contrary to what others say, humanely-raised beef isn't all that expensive and it's just much better in a million ways. Buy in bulk if you can. I buy ground because it's the cheapest. Then you can do tuna a few times a week, which isn't badly priced for protein. For produce that doesn't spoil, maybe cooked isn't the best way to go. You can pack carrot sticks, apples, bananas, salad (wrapped separately from meat so that it doesn't get mushy). Nori can be a great "wrap" if he's in a hurry and utensils are a bother.

Since he can't use a microwave, I imagine eating food cooked in lots of fat would be gross though since it would solidify. For fats, you could pack some nuts, seeds, or avocado.

Eating paleo doesn't necessarily mean eating more expensive.

best answer

2
0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on March 30, 2012
at 10:56 PM

Agreed with the idea of buying an insulated thermos type product to hold something warm and stewlike (braised meat, maybe). Bake a sweet potato and wrap it in tinfoil. Hard boiled eggs (with a little bit of salt)-low cost, good w protein and fat. I like sliced deli meat rolled up and dunked in mustard-kind of like a sandwich w/o the bread. Have you seen the salad in a jar model? http://lifehacker.com/5857420/make-salad-in-a-jar-for-an-easy-grab+and+go-lunch-that-stays-fresh-for-days

best answer

1
Eea6a68f5a7190d13c60e1c72417a581

(1376)

on March 30, 2012
at 11:24 PM

I have 9-10 hour shifts at a somewhat physical job and pack 2 meals. Love all the suggestions above. More ideas: Baked potato or sweet potato. Roasted mixed root veggies-use a combo of butter and olive oil to get them crisp. Ploughman's lunch- sausage, hard cheese, hard boiled egg, pickle, apple. I make alot of crust less quiche eggy pie things- very good way to use up leftover bits of meat and veg. If you eat dairy, you can use odds bits of cheese, sour cream, ricotta, yogurt, cottage cheese or cream cheese. About 6 eggs, 3/4 c of each of cooked veg and dairy additions will fill s pie plate. The more dairy you use, the creamier, the less the easier to eat out of hand. Homemade jerky. Nuts. Leftover roast meat or chicken. Whole Milk non sweetened yogurt. Put stuff in the slow cooker at bedtime so it's hot and ready to pack for lunch in the morning.

best answer

1
E55906cdb6839a23fd740ad85d160cc8

(1159)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:12 AM

Tuna and avocado are a great and inexpensive combo. Hard boiled eggs. Roasting a whole chicken makes a few meals for a few people, stock for soup, and is less expensive than cuts. Meats in salads stay cool with an insulated lunch bag and blue ice pack. Using a lot of chopped crunchy vegetables and less leafy greens makes it heartier. Olive oil, lemon juice, course ground mustard and an herb (I'm nuts about dried oregano in salads) make a fool proof inexpensive dressing.

best answer

0
F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on March 31, 2012
at 01:07 AM

Make a stew or crockpot full of root veggies, greens and meat. Throw it in a thermos. Hardboiled eggs. Baked/steamed sweet potatoes.

best answer

0
Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on March 31, 2012
at 07:34 AM

Cold paleo pancake almond butter and jelly sandwiches

99cd0e1e506a609c6be008d6ba3c548a

(0)

on March 31, 2012
at 12:35 PM

not so paleo...

Fd1c5e35538fbe2ea5eccb8acd7ae546

(496)

on April 01, 2012
at 03:10 PM

the pancakes are made of almond and coconut flour and the jelly should be made without added sugar.I don't understand what's not paleo about it.It's just something different than meat and veggies.We all need variety.Plus it's delicious

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