4

votes

How do you heat food at work without a microwave?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 10, 2010 at 5:56 PM

Nothing in particular against microwaves. Their effect on nutrients seems negligible, and the non-ionizing radiation is most likely not an issue. But I don't feel right being all paleo-like then heating up my lunch five days a week in a space age contraption. Fire-based cooking has been widely used for at least 100,000 years; while microwave based cooking has been widely used for 40 years. Science often ends up being imperfect in retrospect, so I figure might as well play it safe if at all possible.

Are there any alternatives that can be used in the office? There's these mug warmers that plug into a USB slot and baby bottle warmers that are more powerful. Neither is quite the contraption I'm looking for though. Basically, I've got a small container of meat and veggies, and need to heat it in something that won't risk burning down the office. Has anybody used an office food-warming hack? Alternatively, I could keep the meat unrefrigerated for four hours, but I don't know enough about food safety to do that...plus hot food tastes good.

5bd7f43c7da83282bcb78e3aa33832e0

(266)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Working in an office isn't paleo either, but that's a lot more difficult to change than figuring out how to heat food without a microwave. Why did this post get 20 upvotes? You could respond to anything with that. Someone asking about what they should bring with them to lunch at work? Who cares, working in an office isn't paleo either! Might as well take bread and crackers!!

3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 27, 2013
at 03:45 PM

A vacuum thermos bottle made of metal and glass will keep food piping hot for hours. It's what we all used (even school kids) before microwaves were everywhere. Steer clear of cheap plastic thermal containers, and be prepared to spend a lot on a good wide-mouth vacuum thermos.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on May 02, 2012
at 01:32 PM

You are insane! I like it.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Omg what kind of office do you people work in? Grilling, slow cooking at work? Really?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 04, 2012
at 02:49 PM

What's for lunch? Nothing!

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 04, 2012
at 02:34 PM

+1 for "grok noms".

78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

(2290)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:49 PM

Ours was Thermos brand. 16oz. Can purchase from Target, online, etc.

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on December 10, 2011
at 04:07 AM

brand, model size, please? I would like to get one.

306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on August 30, 2011
at 03:43 PM

Yup, nice and bloody cold sirloin salad. :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 30, 2011
at 01:03 PM

why not!? you could put some water between the skin of the ricecooker and the food boul.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 30, 2011
at 01:01 PM

eleven upvotes for an answers which jokes with the question somehow.

9bca3c7a5a8a78433ce4a398b668aa4b

(287)

on August 30, 2011
at 12:39 PM

I agree... cold is best!!!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 12, 2010
at 02:08 PM

Excellent, thanks for the wisdom. If I buy a good thermos, or tiny crockpot, (or a baby bottle warmer), I'll report back.

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 12, 2010
at 06:45 AM

I asked my girlfriend about the hot/warm issue and her feel for the matter, based on inherited wisdom from her Mom who taught her how to cook, is that it should be OK to leave things in that "warmish-hot" state for a few hours. She thinks that mostly what you have to worry about is buffets and heat lamps. For what that's worth. I generally trust handed-down wisdom, partly to justify my laziness in not looking things up, partly because it often seems to do the job just as well. Happy eating.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 12, 2010
at 03:25 AM

I have read as much about Paleo as the average Joe who follows the diet pretty closely, and I understand it's diet principles to be mostly about quality of food. If you are heating grass fed beef and veggies in a microwave, I would say you are 99.99% there. If it's that big of a deal, eat it cold.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 02:31 PM

Here's what I like about these thermoses: they are cheap, and it doesn't involve keeping a heating device in my office. Here's what I don't like: I'd have to heat stuff in the morning, when I don't feel like doing anything, and I'm not sure about the hot/warm food safety thing. Some sources say not to keep meat warm (<140 F) for more than 1-2 hours, although I regularly keep things warm in the slow cooker for 4-5 hours. I wonder if there is just a marginally greater chance of bacterial stuff the longer the food is not cold or hot?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:33 AM

This is the brand, Timolino: http://www.timolino.com/Index.htm Go to the "products" section, there are some food containers. My friend only ever used the normal thermos-style thingamajig, though, since it was just for tea, not food. But those food containers look good, and not too expensive. A lot of it is out of stock?

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:09 AM

"Grok noms". Hee hee.

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:08 AM

If anyone goes this route, be sure to check with your building manager about the building's fire regulations. Where I work the fire inspectors will confiscate personal coffee heaters, etc. Crockpots seem to be OK on potluck days but you can't keep personal electronics that heat things in your cubicle. They might also cause problems with the circuits if on the same ones as the computers, etc. Don't piss off your building manager!

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:02 AM

How long cooked meat can safely stay at a warmed temperature? Isn't that kind of like asking how long it can stay in the slow cooker? I know it's not the same, but I'm sure you see what I mean. At what point does "hot" become "warm" ...

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:00 AM

I just emailed my friend to ask what he has. I'm guessing that if it's expensive it's still probably cheaper than the thermal cooker thing (which otherwise looks awesome) that vrimj suggested. Also my girlfriend informed me that if you have food in your little slow cooker your office will probably smell like food.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 06:26 AM

Apparently the world of thermoses has passed me by while I struggled with free ones offered by credit card companies. Are you talking about this kind of thing? http://www.amazon.com/Thermos-Stainless-King-SK3000MB4-Midnight/dp/B0017IFSIS/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1289456619&sr=8-1

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 06:23 AM

Really?? I'm not totally sold on the mini crockpot, because I'm not sure how well it functions with dry food sans liquid. If you find out the super-thermos brand, I'd be very interested. Do you know how long cooked meat can safely stay at a warmed temperature?

47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on November 11, 2010
at 06:13 AM

It seems you're already sold on the mini slow cooker, but you might still want to look into thermoses. Apparently they've gotten really good. As in, you can scald your lips on your tea three hours later. I can ask my friend what kind he has.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:49 AM

A little overthinking on conventional eating led me to paleo. A little overthinking on conventional heating might not be so bad. Occasional use of the precautionary principle never hurt anyone!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:21 AM

Seriously. Let's not overthink this.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:52 PM

There's these glass containers with snap-on plastic lids at Target and other places. They're not cheap, but they seal completely and you can remove the lid and cover the container with a paper towel to absorb explosions.

D31a2a2d43191b15ca4a1c7ec7d03038

(4134)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:29 PM

If you've got a kitchen to work in, an electric hot plate and a saucepan were often in office kitchens before microwaves. It would mean more work and time than finding some kind of insulated container that would keep lunch warm all morning. There are teensy, tiny fridges that also keep things warm. They hold something the size of a six-pack of soda or beer.

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:17 PM

Touche! Let's hear it for us cube-dwellers! =)

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Regarding the Foreman Grill: Aren't you concerned about PFOA (perflourooctanoic acid) in the plates' non-stick coating?

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on November 10, 2010
at 09:34 PM

What I do is tea for breakfast sometimes heavy cream, no lunch, then have a meal in the afternoon when I get home, and dinner later. I'm still in school, so people's work schedules probably aren't conducive to that though.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:59 PM

Alright, I'm buying one for the office. And I'm naming it Buddy Booboo.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Woo boy, I don't think that's in the cards for me. I already fast during breakfast, and one huge meal at night might be a little too huge for me.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:13 PM

But I don't have one at home.

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 10, 2010
at 08:12 PM

Wook at duh widdle guy!! I want one and I don't even have a reason to buy one!

Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

(13635)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:03 PM

Now that I think about it, I haven't use my Microwave in a long time. It's either the stovetop or toaster oven for me.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Louisa--you're bio says that your kids are unschooled by you. What does that mean?

Medium avatar

(7073)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:37 PM

oh, such a cute little thing, love the colour too ;)

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:20 PM

gotta go with the toaster oven - have done this successfully many times. foreman grill fails in many regards; a rice cooker will steam your food, which isn't a fun thing to do to nicely cooked meat. toaster ovens are great.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:11 PM

Grilling is out of the question, so I'm probably going to go with an even smaller slow cooker...http://www.amazon.com/Maxi-Matic-MST-250R-Cuisine-2-Quart-Round-Shaped/dp/B001TF1HAM/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1289415086&sr=8-5

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:08 PM

Maybe you're right about the thermos, I myself enjoy my food more piping hot. You mentioned the bottle warmer--I think that is a pretty inexpensive way to go:http://www.walmart.com/ip/Munchkin-Deluxe-Bottle-and-Food-Warmer-with-Pacifier-Cleaning-Basket-BPA-Free/10099833 For $20 pretty low investment and putting the food in a glass mason jar would certainly conduct the heat well for you :)

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:02 PM

Let me just add that if you do go for a Foreman grill or the like that they are common in thrift shops so you don't have to spend a whole lot to get something for the office. I like the kind with removable plates, it makes cleaning easier.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:00 PM

Don't get a 16oz Tiny Dipper they have no temp control and usually run too hot in my experience. A small crock pot can roast as well as stew and will give you a lot of choices, but you will be smelling your food all morning and probably a good part of the afternoon, so it would not be my first choice for work.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:51 PM

Oh shoot, it seemed like such an easy way out. I'll look into models with different "keep warm" functions though. Also, how about a tiny crock pot?

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:46 PM

The fuzzy logic ones are expensive so I will assume you are talking about the other kind... These ricecookers time the cooking cycles by loss of water. They can work for cooking other things, in fact I have done other things with them, but the timing is tricky. They also have a cycle where they heat very quickly and then keep warm, so that might work for meat but it is the inverse of how I prefer to cook. I would not try it without liquid, but for reheating a soup or stew it might work.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:36 PM

I agree they are too high for playing so my intent was to play with the concept by using the best insulated lunch size cooler I could and a small inner pot or two, or possibly a metal bowl with a plastic lid. If it works fairly well then an actual cooker might be something I would consider given that they can be had for about $50 http://www.amazon.com/Sunpentown-ST-60B-Stainless-Steel-Non-Electric-6-Liter/dp/B0027FFP9W

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:19 PM

These look intriguing, although a little above my budget.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:16 PM

Warming trays might be an option, but would almost certainly get me in trouble at work because of the exposed hot surface...http://www.amazon.com/Toastess-TWT-20-2-Plate-Cordless-Warming/dp/B000QA12YW/ref=pd_sbs_k_6

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:15 PM

I have a feeling that the thermos wouldn't keep the food hot enough. Is my feeling unjustified? Also, keeping the food in the fridge would be nice in case I have to skip lunch.

2f653fa504adc81612619106e7d1f65e

(455)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:08 PM

What about just keeping it in a thermos? One that is lined with stainless steel or something safe? At one office establishment I worked for they had an oven at our disposal. I think oven heat is the best way to go besides the grill/BBQ.

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24 Answers

19
40e925ddc9657e211c9a2ee83c2cc579

(364)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:13 PM

Use the microwave. Working in an office all day isn't paleo either!

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:17 PM

Touche! Let's hear it for us cube-dwellers! =)

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:21 AM

Seriously. Let's not overthink this.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 11, 2010
at 03:49 AM

A little overthinking on conventional eating led me to paleo. A little overthinking on conventional heating might not be so bad. Occasional use of the precautionary principle never hurt anyone!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on November 12, 2010
at 03:25 AM

I have read as much about Paleo as the average Joe who follows the diet pretty closely, and I understand it's diet principles to be mostly about quality of food. If you are heating grass fed beef and veggies in a microwave, I would say you are 99.99% there. If it's that big of a deal, eat it cold.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 30, 2011
at 01:01 PM

eleven upvotes for an answers which jokes with the question somehow.

5bd7f43c7da83282bcb78e3aa33832e0

(266)

on February 27, 2013
at 05:53 PM

Working in an office isn't paleo either, but that's a lot more difficult to change than figuring out how to heat food without a microwave. Why did this post get 20 upvotes? You could respond to anything with that. Someone asking about what they should bring with them to lunch at work? Who cares, working in an office isn't paleo either! Might as well take bread and crackers!!

7
Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

on November 10, 2010
at 11:11 PM

I'm not as concerned about microwaving, in general, as I am with the CONTAINER I use. Plastics, even deemed "microwave-safe", will leach nasties into your food (BPA, et al). Paper bowls will contribute a nice amount of tasty (GACK) chemical wax, as well.

I keep a microwave-safe stoneware (or glass) bowl/plate at work in which to nuke my grok noms. No more than 3-4 minutes total heating time, and resting period of 1 minute to allow the vibrating water molecules to relax.

C53665c3f012fa1ede91033b08a8a6e7

(2269)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:52 PM

There's these glass containers with snap-on plastic lids at Target and other places. They're not cheap, but they seal completely and you can remove the lid and cover the container with a paper towel to absorb explosions.

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:09 AM

"Grok noms". Hee hee.

Bdf98e5a57befa6f0877f978ba09871c

on February 04, 2012
at 02:34 PM

+1 for "grok noms".

4
Ef9f83cb4e1826261a44c173f733789e

on November 10, 2010
at 06:40 PM

A small toaster oven may work for you. Not as fast as a microwave, but it would get the job done.

61852721b5ff3613f56f043fe890a679

(1172)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:20 PM

gotta go with the toaster oven - have done this successfully many times. foreman grill fails in many regards; a rice cooker will steam your food, which isn't a fun thing to do to nicely cooked meat. toaster ovens are great.

3
5e6a6f5c0fd3ab048f81c0a500206f41

on August 30, 2011
at 02:16 AM

eat it cold! i almost NEVER reheat my leftovers...for some reason i prefer them cold!

306905a32e76b5c0764a663ea7e88426

(1072)

on August 30, 2011
at 03:43 PM

Yup, nice and bloody cold sirloin salad. :)

9bca3c7a5a8a78433ce4a398b668aa4b

(287)

on August 30, 2011
at 12:39 PM

I agree... cold is best!!!

3
Medium avatar

(7073)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:53 PM

1) Get a portable grilling machine like George Foreman's - a small one that will fit on the counter top. All that needs to be done is whack on your meat (stored raw in the fridge). I also do vegetables like onions and tomatoes on it. Do not discard the fat that gets caught in the tray, pour it back on top of the meat. Pile some salad on the side and voila, paleo lunch.

The only problem I can see with this is that you will get complaints about the smell of the grilling from other workers/the boss (especially if you do not have an office kitchen?) Unless you are the boss, I suggest treating everyone to a grill and/or let co-workers use it too (they can make toasted sandwiches on it) and then you will be facing a win/win situation.

2) If grilling is completely out of the question then a small slow cooker/crock pot would be perfect. Put your (lightly cooked) meat in it in the morning and by lunch time it will have heated thoroughly and evenly and produced a glorious rich sauce. You can get very small crock pots that only need to be plugged in - easy.

Again, you may get complaints about the smell, but if you can position it in the office kitchen, then all should be good come lunch time.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:02 PM

Let me just add that if you do go for a Foreman grill or the like that they are common in thrift shops so you don't have to spend a whole lot to get something for the office. I like the kind with removable plates, it makes cleaning easier.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:59 PM

Alright, I'm buying one for the office. And I'm naming it Buddy Booboo.

Medium avatar

(7073)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:37 PM

oh, such a cute little thing, love the colour too ;)

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:11 PM

Grilling is out of the question, so I'm probably going to go with an even smaller slow cooker...http://www.amazon.com/Maxi-Matic-MST-250R-Cuisine-2-Quart-Round-Shaped/dp/B001TF1HAM/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1289415086&sr=8-5

D30ff86ad2c1f3b43b99aed213bcf461

on November 10, 2010
at 08:12 PM

Wook at duh widdle guy!! I want one and I don't even have a reason to buy one!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:57 PM

Louisa--you're bio says that your kids are unschooled by you. What does that mean?

D738a5b2a67f3c36518a2ac9f32d27af

(821)

on November 11, 2010
at 07:08 AM

If anyone goes this route, be sure to check with your building manager about the building's fire regulations. Where I work the fire inspectors will confiscate personal coffee heaters, etc. Crockpots seem to be OK on potluck days but you can't keep personal electronics that heat things in your cubicle. They might also cause problems with the circuits if on the same ones as the computers, etc. Don't piss off your building manager!

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on November 10, 2010
at 11:01 PM

Regarding the Foreman Grill: Aren't you concerned about PFOA (perflourooctanoic acid) in the plates' non-stick coating?

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on May 02, 2012
at 03:18 AM

Omg what kind of office do you people work in? Grilling, slow cooking at work? Really?

2
8ce2e69af79dcb1488f776efc1c54052

on November 10, 2010
at 07:02 PM

Build a fire outside......sorry couldn't resist. I often bring things that I can eat cold. Leftover steak on salad is pretty good stuff!

1
Bfa1c9eacfc94a1b62f3a39b574480c6

(3700)

on May 02, 2012
at 06:13 AM

Don't do what I do.

I stick it in the incubator in my laboratory...

Granted there's no live stuff in the incubator, we use it as a "dry" area for clean glassware.

Ghetto-none the less.

About an hour before I dig in, I put it on a heat block under the hood.

Don't do this, boys and girls.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on May 02, 2012
at 01:32 PM

You are insane! I like it.

1
518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on May 02, 2012
at 06:06 AM

My experience with being a picky human being and using a microwave is that the whole process ends up being: "heat until some of it is burning hot and I have to use the tablecloth that hasn't seen the world outside of the drawer since the 70's to pull the scorching glass container out of the microwave and throw it dramatically onto the closest non-meltable surface, where I then stir it until the freezing cold semi-frozen parts combine to create a generally luke-warm meal".

My solutions:

1) Really good double-walled stainless steel Thermos (the brand). While heating my leftovers, I pour leftover boiled water from the kettle into the Thermos and seal it off for 10 mn or so, so that when I put my leftovers into the Thermos it is already smoking hot inside. This is the key to maintaining a hot temperature! For a semi-warm lunch I like to fill the Thermos with very hot bone broth, then pour it over julienned raw veg and leftover meat- warm and lovely, but fresh and crunchy all at once.

2) Toaster oven. When you think you may be hungry in 20 minutes, put your glass container in the toaster oven and set the temp. Make sure you bring an oven mit or some kind of hand-protection (that old table cloth comes in handy yet again!) so that you don't have to try and use your fork to pull your container onto an officemates plate who may or may not be unimpressed if you chip it during the process.

1
Cd6ee860ff421bb681ff1172ab22f28c

(10)

on May 02, 2012
at 02:54 AM

was looking for an answer myself!

found this, seems like a brillant idea!!

http://www.chipchick.com/2009/04/usb_lunch_box_warmer_heat_food-2.html

im going to buy it and see how we go. You can get them off ebay or some online shops if you look around.

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 04, 2012
at 02:52 PM

We have a small kitchen with a 2 burner hotplate. I keep a small skillet for rewarming.

1
B0fe7b5a9a197cd293978150cbd9055f

(8938)

on February 04, 2012
at 02:40 PM

Wouldn't a steamer be perfect? You wouldn't even have to think about cooking, just throw anything in there...

1
3f11b5fda91063846bba45daac3541bd

(1186)

on August 30, 2011
at 03:00 PM

I stay far, far away from microwaves and bring foods I like at room temp to the office. I much prefer cold leftovers to nuked food.

1
382b95dbbd1aae13909f6265daf4e803

on August 30, 2011
at 02:12 AM

Why is it unacceptable to keep a toaster oven at work and use glass dishes so you can reheat in them directly? That is what I use. Pyrex dishes with lids and a toaster oven. Why the heck do you need anything like a rice cooker etc.?!?!? Microwaves are not safe, I know folks think the radiation issue is debateable, but I am sure that even if it is not putting radiation into the food, it is killing the nutrients in the food. No point in making my food DEAD AS ALL HECK killing all the beneficial nutrients.

1
1c4ada15ca0635582c77dbd9b1317dbf

(2614)

on November 11, 2010
at 08:01 AM

Depending on what you are eating, certain foods can be put in a container which rests in a bowl of very hot water. I've done this in places where there are no microwaves. Works best on liquids or semi-liquids. Or for meat, you could put in a plastic bag and put in the hot water.

1
Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:20 PM

I would just fast. I find it much easier to skip lunch than when I used to bring it. saves me some time, and certainly effort. Sorry, not exactly the answer you were looking for!

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:58 PM

Woo boy, I don't think that's in the cards for me. I already fast during breakfast, and one huge meal at night might be a little too huge for me.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7304)

on November 10, 2010
at 09:34 PM

What I do is tea for breakfast sometimes heavy cream, no lunch, then have a meal in the afternoon when I get home, and dinner later. I'm still in school, so people's work schedules probably aren't conducive to that though.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on February 04, 2012
at 02:49 PM

What's for lunch? Nothing!

1
D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:13 PM

I use the microwave.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on November 10, 2010
at 08:13 PM

But I don't have one at home.

1
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:42 PM

Hold on, what about using a rice cooker?

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:46 PM

The fuzzy logic ones are expensive so I will assume you are talking about the other kind... These ricecookers time the cooking cycles by loss of water. They can work for cooking other things, in fact I have done other things with them, but the timing is tricky. They also have a cycle where they heat very quickly and then keep warm, so that might work for meat but it is the inverse of how I prefer to cook. I would not try it without liquid, but for reheating a soup or stew it might work.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:51 PM

Oh shoot, it seemed like such an easy way out. I'll look into models with different "keep warm" functions though. Also, how about a tiny crock pot?

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 07:00 PM

Don't get a 16oz Tiny Dipper they have no temp control and usually run too hot in my experience. A small crock pot can roast as well as stew and will give you a lot of choices, but you will be smelling your food all morning and probably a good part of the afternoon, so it would not be my first choice for work.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 30, 2011
at 01:03 PM

why not!? you could put some water between the skin of the ricecooker and the food boul.

1
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:14 PM

You might consider a thermal cooker. They are like a thermos with a pot inside. You heat everything up in the pot and then put the pot in the thermos for long slow cooking. I have not tried it but it is number two on my list of cooking experiments to undertake and the one I think would be most handy for the office.

21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:19 PM

These look intriguing, although a little above my budget.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on November 10, 2010
at 06:36 PM

I agree they are too high for playing so my intent was to play with the concept by using the best insulated lunch size cooler I could and a small inner pot or two, or possibly a metal bowl with a plastic lid. If it works fairly well then an actual cooker might be something I would consider given that they can be had for about $50 http://www.amazon.com/Sunpentown-ST-60B-Stainless-Steel-Non-Electric-6-Liter/dp/B0027FFP9W

0
87b7d250ea30415ed4c1afd809f4053f

on February 04, 2012
at 02:26 PM

my food (usually chunks of corned beef) goes from the fridge in the morning to my bag, and stays there until lunch. I know the "safe temperature" is colder than 4oC, or hotter than60oC, but I have a gut of steel, and i've never given my self an upset stomach, plus it's just the right temperature imo.

0
3721f9c2075f13a03aa006c1dffc252f

on February 04, 2012
at 02:11 PM

I think one of those hot pots (that heat water to boiling) would work if you put your food in a boilable vacuum packed bag. However unless your office allows you to cook over a campfire - you have to use something that has technology involved :-). Draw backs of this method, plastic bags.

0
78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

on August 30, 2011
at 03:05 PM

Seriously, just get a good thermos. I pack soup/pot roast/etc at 6am, and it's still hot at 5pm

8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

(6259)

on December 10, 2011
at 04:07 AM

brand, model size, please? I would like to get one.

78972387772c994caa78513a83978437

(2290)

on December 13, 2011
at 05:49 PM

Ours was Thermos brand. 16oz. Can purchase from Target, online, etc.

0
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on August 30, 2011
at 12:35 PM

I've made poached/over easy eggs at work with boiling water before...you have to keep pouring the boiling water on and then let steam...repeat. I assume you could do the same with your meat and veggies.

0
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on November 11, 2010
at 06:00 AM

You could just leave it at room temp for a few hours and then eat it. I yank mine out of the fridge in the morning and put it in a small cooler alongside one bottle of frozen water. The frozen water keeps the cooler moderately cool inside but not super cool. Most food I bring tastes fine at that temp. I only use the micro once in a while for certain foods that I really like hot. But I think most foods taste better at room temp than partially recooked/heated in the micro.

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